Does Varadkar have the balls to stand up to the EU?

raetsel

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Ever since the start of the Brexit negotiations Ireland's position in throwing all the eggs in the EU basket has been a very risky one.

The position of course to create some leverage should have been for Ireland to say, even as a bluff, it would consider it's position in the EU depending on how the withdrawal negotiations went with the UK. Thus being in a position to play the EU and UK for Ireland's advantage.


So now the EU's position on a hard border is shifting, will Leo muster the strength to say "Well if there is to be a hard border in the event of no deal, Ireland will need to consider it's position in the EU"?




EU now looks set to ask Ireland to accept concessions - Independent.ie
There was always going to be a hard border in the event of a hard Brexit. Anyone who couldn't see that is as dull as dishwater. The real question here is "does he have the balls to hold his nerve and dig his heels in?"

Westminster will not go for a hard Brexit on the 29th March despite what anyone said previously. There aren't enough reckless lunatics like Johnson and Rees Mogg to muster up the numbers for that.
 


londonpride

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The EU have started to turn on Ireland over this tax haven business . We will be screwed . the DUP , Known as the Jesus freaks will be wailing with their hands in the air and claiming that God is on their side.
 

NMunsterman

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There was always going to be a hard border in the event of a hard Brexit. Anyone who couldn't see that is as dull as dishwater. The real question here is "does he have the balls to hold his nerve and dig his heels in?"

Westminster will not go for a hard Brexit on the 29th March despite what anyone said previously. There aren't enough reckless lunatics like Johnson and Rees Mogg to muster up the numbers for that.
...and everyone knows that.
The EU has Britain over a barrel.

If Britain wants to enter Trade Deal talks with the EU, Britain has the following 2 options :

(i) Sign up to the WA now pre-Brexit
OR
(ii) Sign up to the WA later post-Brexit.
 

runwiththewind

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That was not the question.

The question is what does anyone have against a solution that involves Ireland remaining in the EU SM, free access to UK SM and no border on the island.
A border between Ireland and the EU. Don't remember voting for that.
 

Dearghoul

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The EU have started to turn on Ireland over this tax haven business . We will be screwed . the DUP , Known as the Jesus freaks will be wailing with their hands in the air and claiming that God is on their side.
Is there a connection between sentences one and two and the third one known only unto yourself?
 

wombat

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A border between Ireland and the EU. Don't remember voting for that.
Its not an option, it will always be "my economy" that motivates voters and we gain a lot more by free access to the rest of the EU than free access to the UK.
 

recedite

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That was not the question.

The question is what does anyone have against a solution that involves Ireland remaining in the EU SM, free access to UK SM and no border on the island.
Short answer; the EU objects.
With no border controls, it would make Ireland a great place to set up an import/export business between UK and EU markets.

Just as well you are not an electrician.
"Hmmm... why can't I just connect this live wire directly onto the copper pipe under the bath.."
 

brughahaha

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Its not an option, it will always be "my economy" that motivates voters and we gain a lot more by free access to the rest of the EU than free access to the UK.
And that is the biggest fallacy of all ...

1. because to reach our European markets we need to access the UK as a landbridge, without delays

2. while multinational figures for European exports are bigger for the EU , employment and SME jobs are far more reliant on the UK market
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Lucky Sir Dead Lenihan isn't around. He never understood how capital could cross water in the first place. But seriously what are the EU proposing that Varadkar has to 'stand up' against?

If there is an attempt at hard border controls it won't be up to Varadkar what happens thereafter. There hasn't been a Taoiseach in fifty years who has ever 'stood up to' the EU or any other external supranational power bloc for that matter. He'd just do the usual- go off to London or Brussels looking very serious altogether and return with some bone in the form of a wording which gives him enough room to claim significant concession which won't exist in the minds of anyone he's been talking to outside of Ireland.

Name the last Taoiseach who has 'defied' the EU, UN, Washington, London, the Fed or said 'no' to them on anything.
 

Maximus Cynicus

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He'd just do the usual- go off to London or Brussels looking very serious altogether and return with some bone in the form of a wording which gives him enough room to claim significant concession which won't exist in the minds of anyone he's been talking to outside of Ireland.
Maybe he could get John Delaney's advice on such matters and have the entire bloc laughing their arses off at the Pixie Heads
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
The thing is that neither Varadkar nor any other Taoiseach before him has ever 'stood up to' any bloc, whether we are officially members of that bloc or not.

Cowan's 'the people have spoken' after Lisbon I when we were the only country to have a referendum on the conversion of a trading bloc to a Federalisation project springs to mind.

We all know what subsequently happened there. The people had to have their mind changed for Lisbon II. There has never been the slightest question of a Taoiseach emerging to defy any international organisation or power bloc, whether it is Washington and its rendition policies involving an Irish airport, the EU at any level, Tim Geithner, the Troika.

The closest we ever come to it is when there are suggestions we should deal with our internal corruption. And from there it is only evasion practised and no kind of 'defiance'.

Varadkar isn't going to break the tradition that Taoisigh are there to sell internally whatever has been decided in international arenas- if only by the sort of apathy displayed by Michael Noonan in recent years when he made great play of what he was going to do as Minister for Finance and then when elected went to Brussels on a PR display, came back with nothing and a 'sure what can you do' sort of explanation.

I've got a funny feeling that the apparent preparations in the background of extra revenue officials being hired and arrangements being prepared for check-pointing by the Gardai tell the real story.

Political Varadkar, Coveney and co don't want to be associated with the re-emergence of a border between Northern Ireland and the Republic but the one thing you can be sure of is that if the EU tells them that the border has to become a customs outpost protecting the EU's single market in the region then that is surely what they will do- denying it all the way.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Remember when it was the official government position that there were no talks ongoing with the IMF/Troika and that reports of the imminent arrival of an IMF bailout team were rubbished. They kept that line going until the IMF team were actually photographed walking down the street in Dublin and heading into a meeting with the Dept of Finance.

It was pure Comical Ali stuff.
 

ruman

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There was always going to be a hard border in the event of a hard Brexit. Anyone who couldn't see that is as dull as dishwater. The real question here is "does he have the balls to hold his nerve and dig his heels in?"

Westminster will not go for a hard Brexit on the 29th March despite what anyone said previously. There aren't enough reckless lunatics like Johnson and Rees Mogg to muster up the numbers for that.
Agreed. A hard border is needed , if we dont impose one with NI we risk having one imposed on us when we try to travel to or import to the rest of the EU.
 

londonpride

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Is there a connection between sentences one and two and the third one known only unto yourself?
Obviously a great lacking in intelligence, Must be a follower of the Poof who was nailed to a cross 2000 years ago possibly for molesting boys as his Apostles {Priests } continue doing so today.
 
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paddycomeback

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Agreed. A hard border is needed , if we dont impose one with NI we risk having one imposed on us when we try to travel to or import to the rest of the EU.
We do have to go through immigration entering other EU countries thanks to being in the Common Travel Area and thus outside Schengen.
Seeing as we are semi-detached for people, what's the big deal about a check on goods in the same manner, in order to keep the border open?
And don't say Single Market integrity, because smuggling will banjax that.
 

parentheses

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Remember when it was the official government position that there were no talks ongoing with the IMF/Troika and that reports of the imminent arrival of an IMF bailout team were rubbished. They kept that line going until the IMF team were actually photographed walking down the street in Dublin and heading into a meeting with the Dept of Finance.

It was pure Comical Ali stuff.
Pretty much the same this week. Michael Creed said there would be no hard border. Couple days later Leo was talking about troops, infrastructure, and surveillance devices on the border
 

raetsel

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We do have to go through immigration entering other EU countries thanks to being in the Common Travel Area and thus outside Schengen.
Seeing as we are semi-detached for people, what's the big deal about a check on goods in the same manner, in order to keep the border open?
And don't say Single Market integrity, because smuggling will banjax that.
Simple. It is a barrier to trade.

I live on the northern side of the border and cross it regularly. I certainly don't want a hard border but common sense dictates that Ireland's trade with the EU is far more important than it's UK business.
 


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