Double standards or skewed moral compass

derryman

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Most will have heard or read of the "scandal" of the Australian cricketers cheating on S Africa. Well it just wasn't cricket was it, however the following link was sent to me and I feel it is well worth highlighting and discussing.
https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10155672207384858&id=784889857.

Given similar events locally I thought this might stimulate some soul searching

For Silver harp and fellow lazy posters:

I found the above article more than a little interesting, in that the writer highlighted the extreme violent behaviour of promising australian sportsmen, who have subsequently been reinstated in their sport at the highest level. However these chaps whose only intent was to change the condition of a piece of leather (as opposed to attempting to Alter the features of females) may never ever get to this level again and if they do it certainly wont be forgotton by the media or indeed the supporters. Their name is now dirt in the sport of cricket while those who have grievously harmed ladies and girls are celebrated as heroes.
 
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silverharp

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for the lazy amongst us can you outline the issue instead of using click bait
 

Cdebru

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Most will have heard or read of the "scandal" of the Australian cricketers cheating on S Africa. Well it just wasn't cricket was it, however the following link was sent to me and I feel it is well worth highlighting and discussing.
https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10155672207384858&id=784889857.

Given similar events locally I thought this might stimulate some soul searching

How the hell did that guy Mathew Lodge avoid prison ?


Matthew Lodge attack victims speak out as CCTV footage emerges of NRL player's drunken assault - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
 

derryman

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for the lazy amongst us can you outline the issue instead of using click bait
I suppose i myself were guilty of being lazy when writing the op. However thanks for pointing that out and hopefully I have given enough information to encourage you to click on the link and read the article.
 

Niall996

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You die on your own sword. The Cricket fraternity like to portray the game as something other than simply a sport so in those circumstances, if you get a life long ban for picking your nose on camera so be it. That's how they want their game to be. All emporers new clothes of course.
 

derryman

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You die on your own sword. The Cricket fraternity like to portray the game as something other than simply a sport so in those circumstances, if you get a life long ban for picking your nose on camera so be it. That's how they want their game to be. All emporers new clothes of course.
I think you are missing the point entirely.
Have you any thoughts on the differing reactions to the wrongdoings of the players.
 

GDPR

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I think you are missing the point entirely.
Have you any thoughts on the differing reactions to the wrongdoings of the players.
That poster is usually to be found posting porno fantasies about the willingness of young females to engage in group sex with randoms only to suddenly become embarrassed if another woman observes them, so I wouldnt pay too much attention to him. Even the machistas on Pie are bored with his compulsive posting on the topic. A closet is missing its usual inhabitant. :D

I did smile at some cricketers like Shane Warner suddenly deciding that the worse thing you could be accused of was tampering with a cricket ball. The man regularly exhorted by his own supporters, not the British Barmy Army, to "Warnie, put your wanger away, man/Warnie, put your wanger away."

Sporting heroes whose feet are made of clay. The ethos of sport goes beyond winning. Parents who are driven quietly mad by taking their kids to sports do so because they believe that it is character-building, not just a means of ensuring they have exercise.
 

RadicalJacobin

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Most will have heard or read of the "scandal" of the Australian cricketers cheating on S Africa. Well it just wasn't cricket was it, however the following link was sent to me and I feel it is well worth highlighting and discussing.
https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10155672207384858&id=784889857.

Given similar events locally I thought this might stimulate some soul searching

For Silver harp and fellow lazy posters:

I found the above article more than a little interesting, in that the writer highlighted the extreme violent behaviour of promising australian sportsmen, who have subsequently been reinstated in their sport at the highest level. However these chaps whose only intent was to change the condition of a piece of leather (as opposed to attempting to Alter the features of females) may never ever get to this level again and if they do it certainly wont be forgotton by the media or indeed the supporters. Their name is now dirt in the sport of cricket while those who have grievously harmed ladies and girls are celebrated as heroes.
Wow... some classy lads there. It just goes to show the hypocrisy, misogyny and unwillingness to admit that there are problems that infects not just sports but all of society.
 

Niall996

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I think you are missing the point entirely.
Have you any thoughts on the differing reactions to the wrongdoings of the players.
Obviously. You're missing the point. The actions of the violent players (outside of the sport) is abominable. They should be rotting in jail, not on a football pitch. But cheating in sport (something that happens in the sport as opposed to outside of the sport) is a huge global story whether it's drugs, ball tampering, match fixing etc. This positioning of sports people as some sort of moral totems in society is ridiculous in my view. But some sports choose it more than others.
 

derryman

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Obviously. You're missing the point. The actions of the violent players (outside of the sport) is abominable. They should be rotting in jail, not on a football pitch. But cheating in sport (something that happens in the sport as opposed to outside of the sport) is a huge global story whether it's drugs, ball tampering, match fixing etc. This positioning of sports people as some sort of moral totems in society is ridiculous in my view. But some sports choose it more than others.

But the thread is not about the abominable actions of the sporting "Heroes".
The thread is about society, media and sporting body's attitude to and about perceived wrongdoing of these very same "heroes".
Cheating in the sport is viewed as being more grievous than physically attacking and maiming women. I am hoping that some of us might actually come to understand ourselves and our attitude to violence against women.
 

Niall996

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But the thread is not about the abominable actions of the sporting "Heroes".
The thread is about society, media and sporting body's attitude to and about perceived wrongdoing of these very same "heroes".
Cheating in the sport is viewed as being more grievous than physically attacking and maiming women. I am hoping that some of us might actually come to understand ourselves and our attitude to violence against women.
We all loathe violence against women. That's a given. Personally I can't understand how those players end up back on a team and get continued support from fans. I don't know them. Maybe there's is a lot of push back from fans. But on the core principle, behaviour off the field versus behaviour on the field. If you beat up your wife tonight are you automatically banned from going to work tomorrow by your employer? Should you be? Where do you draw the line in terms of your employer punishing you for crimes you commit elsewhere?
 

silverharp

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on reflection the question has to be asked should a criminal offense preclude one from making a living in the future? the standard answer tends to be no. in other areas of entertainment various actors and musicians have been done for domestic violence and other crimes and nobody has seriously suggested that they should never work again
 

derryman

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We all loathe violence against women. That's a given. Personally I can't understand how those players end up back on a team and get continued support from fans. I don't know them. Maybe there's is a lot of push back from fans. But on the core principle, behaviour off the field versus behaviour on the field. If you beat up your wife tonight are you automatically banned from going to work tomorrow by your employer? Should you be? Where do you draw the line in terms of your employer punishing you for crimes you commit elsewhere?
I am afraid you are still missing the point. It's not about whether they make the team or not it is about society's attitude of forgiveness for violence towards your girlfriend , and their non forgiveness of cheating at sport. Perhaps you think ball tampering is of a greater moral transgression than attacking your partner.
 

derryman

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on reflection the question has to be asked should a criminal offense preclude one from making a living in the future? the standard answer tends to be no. in other areas of entertainment various actors and musicians have been done for domestic violence and other crimes and nobody has seriously suggested that they should never work again
See my reply to Nial996.
 

Niall996

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I am afraid you are still missing the point. It's not about whether they make the team or not it is about society's attitude of forgiveness for violence towards your girlfriend , and their non forgiveness of cheating at sport. Perhaps you think ball tampering is of a greater moral transgression than attacking your partner.
No you are still missing the point. It's not that society sees marking a ball as more serious than beating up someone. That's not what is happening. Of course society recognises that assault is far more serious. That's why people go to jail for it. Big uproars about cheating in sport are not reflective of societies actual view of which is more serious. They are two different universes. IF you break the code of the sport you can be banned for life from that sport. It's part of the sports rules and culture. What you do outside of the sport is a civil/criminal matter. It doesn't matter who beats up their wife. It's a grotesque thing whether you're a sport star or a plumber. It doesn't matter.
 

silverharp

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See my reply to Nial996.
its not a matter of worse and i'd agree domestic abuse is worse however compromising a sport is worse for the sport.
 

derryman

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its not a matter of worse and i'd agree domestic abuse is worse however compromising a sport is worse for the sport.
But I am not talking about penalties for offence whether sporting or criminal. I am talking about our attitude , your's mine and society's. We seem to have an ability to compartmentalise our disapproval of wrong doings. When we see a sporting star who has been convicted of gbh we appear to have less disdain for them than for a ball tamperer.
 

petaljam

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No you are still missing the point. It's not that society sees marking a ball as more serious than beating up someone. That's not what is happening. Of course society recognises that assault is far more serious. That's why people go to jail for it. Big uproars about cheating in sport are not reflective of societies actual view of which is more serious. They are two different universes. IF you break the code of the sport you can be banned for life from that sport. It's part of the sports rules and culture. What you do outside of the sport is a civil/criminal matter. It doesn't matter who beats up their wife. It's a grotesque thing whether you're a sport star or a plumber. It doesn't matter.
I think that's rather disingenuous TBH. The idea that being a professional footballer is just like being a plumber or a teacher is odd for one thing. Kicking a ball around a field isn't something we need people to do - imagine kids setting up a pretend city or something : "you be the one that looks after the sick people, I'll be the policeman catching criminals, and he'll be the one that plays football". :rolleyes:

Sportsmen are entertainers, their role isnt just being good at the sport. To say that it doesnt matter that they are absolute sh1ts and even criminals in the rest of their lives missing the point - their real life is relevant to their role as entertainers.

lt's relevant when a teacher or a doctor has been found guilty of a serious crime, because of the nature of their work.
IMO it's equally relevant when people who are idolized by kids, and who are set up by sponsors to be idolized.
 

Niall996

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But I am not talking about penalties for offence whether sporting or criminal. I am talking about our attitude , your's mine and society's. We seem to have an ability to compartmentalise our disapproval of wrong doings. When we see a sporting star who has been convicted of gbh we appear to have less disdain for them than for a ball tamperer.
The public are offended by off field criminality. Sport stars who commit crimes do lose their sponsorship deals because the public turn against them. I'm not sure where you're getting this idea that society condemns cheating in sports more than criminality. I don't think people do want criminals on their sports teams.
 

Niall996

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I think that's rather disingenuous TBH. The idea that being a professional footballer is just like being a plumber or a teacher is odd for one thing. Kicking a ball around a field isn't something we need people to do - imagine kids setting up a pretend city or something : "you be the one that looks after the sick people, I'll be the policeman catching criminals, and he'll be the one that plays football". :rolleyes:

Sportsmen are entertainers, their role isnt just being good at the sport. To say that it doesnt matter that they are absolute sh1ts and even criminals in the rest of their lives missing the point - their real life is relevant to their role as entertainers.

lt's relevant when a teacher or a doctor has been found guilty of a serious crime, because of the nature of their work.
IMO it's equally relevant when people who are idolized by kids, and who are set up by sponsors to be idolized.
Who says it doesn't matter. Of course it matters. Sponsors don't want criminals on teams because the public do turn away from them. People don't want muggers, rapists, paedophiles or murderers on their favourite teams. Surely that goes without saying? When I say it doesn't matter - I mean the sports star has absolutely no special pass. He/She is as equally gross in their actions.
 


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