Dublin City Council plan new Coastal Town in Dublin the "Venice Quarter" Do they believe in Global Warming?

Hans Von Horn

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Dublin City Council plan new Coastal Town in Dublin the "Venice Quarter" Do they believe in Global Warming?

Dublin City Council plan a new two which that call Poolbeg West which is to accommodate up to 3000 new homes. The site comprises 34 hectares and includes 10 acres of the Glass Bottle Site.

The IPCC the International Panel on Climate Change, which is a United Nations Body, have found that the risk of climate change involving rising temperatures, is so great that they urge reducing CO2 emissions by 80% by 2050 and eliminating them completely by 2100 to hold climate change to a 2°C degree rise.

Discounting the issue of whether climate change is a real danger the issue is can climate change and sea level be controlled, and would it be much cheaper to simply move new developments to higher ground, the "build up the hill" solution.


If sea level rise cannot be halted, the alternatives are:
(1) Build tidal barriers and reclaim land from the sea
(2) Use Gondolas as in Venice
(3) Abandon the new quarter and move further up the hill.

Dublin City Council unveils plans for new south Dublin coastal...
Option 3 seems the most sensible one at the moment and leave land to become a nature reserve.
 


Crack hoe

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I wonder what the insurance companies are saying about this plan?
 

silverharp

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without getting hysterical about it simply add a couple of feet to the walls? I have lived in Sandymount for years and talking to some oldtimers the worst sea related flooding they remember was back in the 50's or 60's. Its not the west coast so it doesn't get violent surges like other places.
 

Hans Von Horn

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Analyzer

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At least they are doing something about the residential supply problem.
 

Roll_On

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You're more likely to get tidal flooding in Clontarf. none of the residential units will be ground floor either.
 

Crack hoe

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But you know to get a mortgage you need to get insurance on your property. If you can't get the insurance due to flood risk you can't get a mortgage. Unless you pay cash.
Now I'm sure the council knows this and they have talked to the insurance industry about this but maybe just maybe they have spent a shed load of money on a non runner, how likely is that?
 

Roll_On

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But you know to get a mortgage you need to get insurance on your property. If you can't get the insurance due to flood risk you can't get a mortgage. Unless you pay cash.
Now I'm sure the council knows this and they have talked to the insurance industry about this but maybe just maybe they have spent a shed load of money on a non runner, how likely is that?
The area doesn't flood and none of the homes are at ground level anyway, the lowest apartments will be 1st floor.
 

Henry94.

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Is there any evidence internationally that global warming has had an impact on property prices? You would expect the market to price in risk so that low-lying areas would see values fall. Or is it too soon?
 

Watcher2

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Dublin City Council plan a new two which that call Poolbeg West which is to accommodate up to 3000 new homes. The site comprises 34 hectares and includes 10 acres of the Glass Bottle Site.

The IPCC the International Panel on Climate Change, which is a United Nations Body, have found that the risk of climate change involving rising temperatures, is so great that they urge reducing CO2 emissions by 80% by 2050 and eliminating them completely by 2100 to hold climate change to a 2°C degree rise.

Discounting the issue of whether climate change is a real danger the issue is can climate change and sea level be controlled, and would it be much cheaper to simply move new developments to higher ground, the "build up the hill" solution.


If sea level rise cannot be halted, the alternatives are:
(1) Build tidal barriers and reclaim land from the sea
(2) Use Gondolas as in Venice
(3) Abandon the new quarter and move further up the hill.

Dublin City Council unveils plans for new south Dublin coastal...
Option 3 seems the most sensible one at the moment and leave land to become a nature reserve.
Taller buildings is your only solution (be that up a hill or otherwise). The higher you go, the less land you ultimately use. Starting a high rise development somewhere like the docklands is a great place to start because on at least one side you have no one cribbing they are being over looked, which essentially is the main reason against high rise, is it not?
 

Crack hoe

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The area doesn't flood and none of the homes are at ground level anyway, the lowest apartments will be 1st floor.
The area doesn't flood now....but will it remain that way for the lifetime of a mortgage
It's lovely that the flats are not ground floor but my guess is the roads and utilities are certainly going to be on the ground and could be prone to flooding. I guess people could have a little inflatable under their bed just in case like, so they drop the kid's of to school on the flood day or get the shopping.
That land would make a beautiful park.
 

silverharp

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Is there any evidence internationally that global warming has had an impact on property prices? You would expect the market to price in risk so that low-lying areas would see values fall. Or is it too soon?
I changed house insurance and I was asked did I live more than 200mtrs from the sea which I do, not sure what the loading is though? If you know the Strand road some of the houses have put in barriers for the odd time the sea goes over the walls but then they tend to have basements
 

Roll_On

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The area doesn't flood now....but will it remain that way for the lifetime of a mortgage
It's lovely that the flats are not ground floor but my guess is the roads and utilities are certainly going to be on the ground and could be prone to flooding. I guess people could have a little inflatable under their bed just in case like, so they drop the kid's of to school on the flood day or get the shopping.
That land would make a beautiful park.
The ground floor of the proposed buildings is 6m above high tide. Global warming isn't going to raise sea levels by 6m in our lifetimes, if it does we have bigger problems.
 

silverharp

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More to the point, why does Mullingar get spared? They are all inbred freaks.
And Tallaght being prime seafront property, it would be like the worst Spanish resort in winter
 


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