Dublin Pyjamas Culture

Bakunin

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Jun 16, 2007
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116
It's spreading according to some social/fashion commentator on Newstalk a few weeks ago (Moncrieff, IIRC).

Apparently they are now considered by some as a subset of the penchant for tracksuits-for-all-occasions.

So much for raging against the dictates of fashion, seemingly it actually is the fashion, and not just with the ''underclass''.

I completely agree though, that people should wear absolutely what they wish. But you'd be no less a knacker for that.
 


CitiZenJon

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Mar 28, 2008
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citizenjon2008dublincastle.wordpress.com
The elusive Dublin skank

I lived on Dublin's Parnell street - 2 minutes from O'Connell Street - for 10 years. A Southsider by birth, I was facinated by the habits and activities of the native people.
I was particularly intrigued by the PJ phenomenon. After some cogitation, and not a few roonies, it occurred to me that the females concerned all came from the local area (Summerhill, Parnell st, Gardener street - North inner city) and were all, what might be indelicately called, working class.
I first noticed these young-ones parading around in their nocturnal apparel 'round about 03/04, roughly the same time that ethnic businesses started appearing in what is now affectionately known as Little China.
If you ask me, the PJ fad is mostly a territorial display, kind of like, "I got me shiny silk pajamas on, jeknowharIme-an, 'cause I live just around the cor-nor and I belong he-or."
 
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cancer said:
Parents have to shoulder blame. This is wrong. What sort of values and moral / public code are children like these being reared in?
Maybe they just havn't cracked the code...... :?
 
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Re: The elusive Dublin skank

CitiZenJon said:
I lived on Dublin's Parnell street - 2 minutes from O'Connell Street - for 10 years. A Southsider by birth, I was facinated by the habits and activities of the native people.
I was particularly intrigued by the PJ phenomenon. After some cogitation, and not a few roonies, it occurred to me that the females concerned all came from the local area (Summerhill, Parnell st, Gardener street - North inner city) and were all, what might be indelicately called, working class.
I first noticed these young-ones parading around in their nocturnal apparel 'round about 03/04, roughly the same time that ethnic businesses started appearing in what is now affectionately known as Little China.
If you ask me, the PJ fad is mostly a territorial display, kind of like, "I got me shiny silk pajamas on, jeknowharIme-an, 'cause I live just around the cor-nor and I belong he-or."
I think you've nailed it. :lol:
 

campbeca

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Apr 11, 2005
Messages
63
Re: The elusive Dublin skank

politicsisrotten said:
CitiZenJon said:
I lived on Dublin's Parnell street - 2 minutes from O'Connell Street - for 10 years. A Southsider by birth, I was facinated by the habits and activities of the native people.
I was particularly intrigued by the PJ phenomenon. After some cogitation, and not a few roonies, it occurred to me that the females concerned all came from the local area (Summerhill, Parnell st, Gardener street - North inner city) and were all, what might be indelicately called, working class.
I first noticed these young-ones parading around in their nocturnal apparel 'round about 03/04, roughly the same time that ethnic businesses started appearing in what is now affectionately known as Little China.
If you ask me, the PJ fad is mostly a territorial display, kind of like, "I got me shiny silk pajamas on, jeknowharIme-an, 'cause I live just around the cor-nor and I belong he-or."
I think you've nailed it. :lol:
That's a pretty good theory. Akin to a dog cocking its leg towards a lamppost (no comparison intended)
 

....isainmdom

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Jul 10, 2008
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As a Dub living in an Estate were this takes place on a daily basis and you can see people maybe a mile or two away from their homes I think it damages the image of working class Estates. Someone walking down the street at four o'clock in the day gives the impression of an area were people are to lazy to get dressed and to lazy to contribute possitively to society, which is generally far from the truth but feeds into the negative stereotypes and further marginalises the chhildren form the areas in question. So yes I hate to see it for that reason :evil: :evil: :evil:
 

....isainmdom

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Conclusion: northsiders are more Boston; southsiders are more Berlin
This occurs on both sides of the liffey, nothing to do with Northside - Southside.
 

mervindoo

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Jul 18, 2008
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A few theories on the PJ Scene,

1 My husband/fella is a gangster/rich so I dont have to get up and get changed at any specific time . In your face .

2 Pyjamus suggests bed suggests sex therfore is sexy

3 Started out with unemployed people not arsed changing from pjs making small trips to local news agent in pjs then going a little further and further before becoming a trend among some social class . just like baggy hip hop clothes originated from ghetto parents buying kids clothes ten sizes too big to save money on growing children .

4 the mohak or safety pin in the ear of a section of society giving the two fingers to people who work for a living

5 they are the original real dubs so maybe they see city centre as an extension of their living room and have no probs lounging around in pjs , as if they see no distinction between home enviroment and outside real world
 

DAOINE

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Jul 26, 2007
Messages
50
I have been in China since 2000 and people wore their pyjamas all day then and still do now. It is generally mostly women but I have seen many men do it too. Underpants and nothing else is also common for men. My neighbour last night went for a walk with the dog in his Y-fronts and nothing else apart from shoes and socks and dyed black hair. Not a pretty sight. Must be about 75.I found it odd when I first went to China to see all the pyjamas being worn while shopping or cycling around. Also people going to the toilet, number one and two on the street.A Dublin person that I met confirmed and this is 2002 it was common in Dublin to wear PJ's. She said Ian Dempsey had made a few comments about it on the radio show.
The pyjama thing does look lazy and so the headmaster in Belfast was correct to scold the mothers. It is not his business but it looks bad in front of children. Call me old fashioned but it doesnt look productive. We should be adding to society in any way we can and setting a good example is part of that.
 

popper

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Oct 4, 2004
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297
caminoed said:
wearing pyjamas during the day/outside is a working class Dublin tradition. it goes back to when people could not afford much clothes. they would wear their pyjamas all day on saturday, going to hairdressers etc while their clothes were washing/drying for the saturday night out. no real harm in it, and to say the least there is a total overreaction to it on this thread!

Go away out of that! No-one would have been seen dead out doors in their pyjamas up to a few years ago. Indeed working class Dubs, and Irish people in general, were always fastidious about clothes even to the mad extent that someone who was drinking all day in a pub on Saturday would go home and come back in the evening in a suit!

Anyway, weren't the pioneers of this wandering about in pjs black women in Harlem?

Anyway, it's worldwide phenomenon now. Check out these dudes!:

http://pictureyear.blogspot.com/2008/05/more-pjs.html
 

Aindriu

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8,634
merle haggard said:
there are some really dumb middle class people here . If you had a clue youd know that the Irish women who wear pyjamas in public are doing so as a tribute to their late fathers , all of whom were known as P J .
Brilliant! :lol: :lol:
 

headworms

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Apr 2, 2008
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In a world with most of its populous brain-dead and asleep and performing functions no more intelligent than monkeys it seems apt that people are dressing for the occasion. Also anyone who has a problem with it needs to realise that there's actual problems greater than people wearing comfortable clothes regardless of social acceptability.
 

myksav

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fergalr said:
dsmythy said:
Not everyone needs to be in fashion.
Or in outdoor clothers, for that matter. And I don't think it's a matter of letting them wear pyjamas. To be frank, no-one's really that exercised about a bunch of knackers pramming around town, apart maybe from the Dept of Finance who has to pay them their cocktail of benefits. Snobby? Well, maybe, but at least I dress myself when I leave the house :roll:

johnfás said:
I notice it all the time around North Inner City Dublin and it looks absolutely terrible. Why don't these people just put on some clothes? Women walking buggies in the afternoon in a pair of pajamas for goodness sake.
You and I both know that the last time a member of your family crossed the Liffey it was probably to flush those Fenians out of the GPO ;)
You're more likely to see pyjama'd women geting out of MPV's and SUV's dropping the little darlings off to school, than the "less well-off". These're more likely seen in those "shell-suit" pants. :shock: (blech)
 

myksav

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Undercover Reporter said:
Folks,

You could just as easy whinge about people who buy a new pair of dirty jeans. I bet most of you own a pair.

Some things are just bad taste, but its fashion so who cares!

Can you imaging a few generations time people will
think:

"PJ's during the daytime hhmmm, comfy and afront to civilised society, makes sense for those who dont have much and dont want to conform"

Buying a new pair of dirty Jeans:
"hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhmmmmmmm, reaseach, PHD,hmmmmmmmmmmmmm, More research, hhmmmmmm, People buying dirty jeans?!? Impossible to fathom. buying an expensive pair of dirty jeans = some form of collective insanity of the upper and lower classes "
dirty jeans from new? Do you mind, I just ate. Maybe it's military training but clean clothes are a must. Dirty clothes do not maintain proper temperature control. Aside from the hygiene factor.
 

TheBear

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May 25, 2004
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234
myksav said:
You're more likely to see pyjama'd women geting out of MPV's and SUV's dropping the little darlings off to school, than the "less well-off". These're more likely seen in those "shell-suit" pants. :shock: (blech)
Really? I wouldn't believe that, based on my previous residence in Smithfield and my current residence close enough to UCD.
 

myksav

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TheBear said:
myksav said:
You're more likely to see pyjama'd women geting out of MPV's and SUV's dropping the little darlings off to school, than the "less well-off". These're more likely seen in those "shell-suit" pants. :shock: (blech)
Really? I wouldn't believe that, based on my previous residence in Smithfield and my current residence close enough to UCD.
Try down the country a bit. (shudder)
 

GrainneMhaol

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Jun 23, 2008
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StripeyCat said:
Lots of people in Asia wear western style pyjamas as daywear



http://blogs.bootsnall.com/fuzzyboots/a ... 0816.shtml

I've heard them called "manjamas" when men wear them. I've heard that in Japan, people will come home and change into the pyjamas to go to the local cafe or restaurant, but put on more fashionable clothes to go into the city centre. This is exactly the way people wear their pyjamas in the north inner city.
At least in China, they have the excuse that pyjamas are similar to traditional Chinese workers dress (the loose blue shirt and pants of the Mao era) so it looks vaguely appropriate on them.

Don't think the same can be said in Ireland, especially with the climate! Surely they must get soaked going out?? :eek:
 

katy brock

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201
GrainneMhaol said:
StripeyCat said:
Lots of people in Asia wear western style pyjamas as daywear



http://blogs.bootsnall.com/fuzzyboots/a ... 0816.shtml

I've heard them called "manjamas" when men wear them. I've heard that in Japan, people will come home and change into the pyjamas to go to the local cafe or restaurant, but put on more fashionable clothes to go into the city centre. This is exactly the way people wear their pyjamas in the north inner city.
At least in China, they have the excuse that pyjamas are similar to traditional Chinese workers dress (the loose blue shirt and pants of the Mao era) so it looks vaguely appropriate on them.

Don't think the same can be said in Ireland, especially with the climate! Surely they must get soaked going out?? :eek:

Plenty of shelter in the dole office, HSE office, the bookies, McDonalds, the local, the off-licence, video game emporium, etc etc etc.......
 

michael1965

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143
mervindoo said:
A few theories on the PJ Scene,

1 My husband/fella is a gangster/rich so I dont have to get up and get changed at any specific time . In your face .

2 Pyjamus suggests bed suggests sex therfore is sexy

3 Started out with unemployed people not arsed changing from pjs making small trips to local news agent in pjs then going a little further and further before becoming a trend among some social class . just like baggy hip hop clothes originated from ghetto parents buying kids clothes ten sizes too big to save money on growing children .

4 the mohak or safety pin in the ear of a section of society giving the two fingers to people who work for a living

5 they are the original real dubs so maybe they see city centre as an extension of their living room and have no probs lounging around in pjs , as if they see no distinction between home enviroment and outside real world
That all sounds plausible enough, except for no. 2 :?
 


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