Dublin: Quack kills man by trying to treat peanut allergy with peanuts

cyberianpan

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In Ireland modern medics are pretty good, they're very fond of evidence and frequently save lives.

Here we've a story of a quack giving peanuts to someone with a peanut allergy ... the dude with the peanut allergy died of .... well peanut allergy

Irish Independent - Man died an hour after being treated for peanut allergy
He had earlier been treated for the peanut allergy by kinesiologist Dr Brett Stevens, who told the inquest that Mr Schatten ate a small bit of peanut during his appointment, to which he had no reaction.

The allergy elimination technique used by Dr Stevens, who is also a chiropractor, is called NAET and involves "muscle testing".
...
Professor of histopathology at the Royal College of Surgeons and at Beaumont Hospital, Mary Leader, told the inquest that in (allopathic) medicine such desensitisation would not be carried out without strict supervision in a hospital where drugs, IV access, oxygen and a doctor were immediately available and she said no person should be tested for nut allergy without these. "If a patient has an acute anaphylactic reaction like this they are immediately treated with drugs to stop the reaction," she said.
Now if people want to take advice from quacks, they should be free to, though I'd question it going any further than advice. Also if we can have health warnings on cigarettes can we also have them on quackpots ?

"Warning there is no evidence that any of these treatments are of benefit & they may very well seriously harm or kill you"

Also note that I would distinguish alternative from complementary therapies - "alternative" sets itself up in opposition to modern medicine ; complementary works alongside as an extra (e.g. reflexology) . This was a case of "alternative" medicine.


cYp
 


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In Ireland modern medics are pretty good, they're very fond of evidence and frequently save lives.

Here we've a story of a quack giving peanuts to someone with a peanut allergy ... the dude with the peanut allergy died of .... well peanut allergy



Now if people want to take advice from quacks, they should be free to, though I'd question it going any further than advice. Also if we can have health warnings on cigarettes can we also have them on quackpots ?

"Warning there is no evidence that any of these treatments are of benefit & they may very well seriously harm or kill you"

Also note that I would distinguish alternative from complementary therapies - "alternative" sets itself up in opposition to modern medicine ; complementary works alongside as an extra (e.g. reflexology) . This was a case of "alternative" medicine.


cYp
This is a strange story, firstly the amount of peanut introduced should have been microscopic and not eaten, I would have thought.

secondly the patient should have had their own epipen/anapen and should have injected adrenaline at first onset of symptoms.

Sounds to me like there were other factors at work here.

I was offered a similar treatment for a severe allergy years ago and turned it down because it would have involved weekly visits for 1 year fortnightly for a further 3 years and the risk of anaphylatic shock at every visit
 

Factorem

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In Ireland modern medics are pretty good, they're very fond of evidence and frequently save lives.

Here we've a story of a quack giving peanuts to someone with a peanut allergy ... the dude with the peanut allergy died of .... well peanut allergy



Now if people want to take advice from quacks, they should be free to, though I'd question it going any further than advice. Also if we can have health warnings on cigarettes can we also have them on quackpots ?

"Warning there is no evidence that any of these treatments are of benefit & they may very well seriously harm or kill you"

Also note that I would distinguish alternative from complementary therapies - "alternative" sets itself up in opposition to modern medicine ; complementary works alongside as an extra (e.g. reflexology) . This was a case of "alternative" medicine.


cYp
The poor man. May he rest in peace.
 

jimmyfour

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Also note that I would distinguish alternative from complementary therapies - "alternative" sets itself up in opposition to modern medicine ; complementary works alongside as an extra (e.g. reflexology) . This was a case of "alternative" medicine.


cYp
The only officially regulated health care providers in ireland are medical doctors. If your practitoner, therapist, counsellor, etc., is not a medical doctor there are no mandatory regulatory bodies.

Feel free to make a choice as a to what type of care you want but be under no illusions.
 

jpc

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The Ben Goldacre Bad Science column in the Guardian is well worth a read in relation to this type of charlatinism.
 

Gruffalo

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Did the man not contribute to his own death by being stupid enough to go along with it? Peanut allergies are often extremely dangerous, why would you eat a peanut to cure it?

May he rest in peace, and may our Governmnet pull their heads out of their asses and remove these charlatans from society.
 

oceanclub

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Why would a kinesiologist be treating allergies? According to Wikipedia, "Kinesiology, also known as human kinetics, is the science of human movement."

Did the report get mixed up, and the guy is actually an "Applied kinesiology" (Applied kinesiology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia), which is " a practice within the realm of alternative medicine and is different from "kinesiology," which is the scientific study of human movement. AK has been criticized on theoretical and empirical grounds,[7] and characterized as pseudoscience" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Applied_kinesiology)?
P.
 

islands

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My daughter who has a kiwi allergy was also invited to bring some kiwi along to an appointment with a very eminent consultant in the area. It seems to be a form of treatment that is gaining respect, though maybe ill-founded
 

cyberianpan

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My daughter who has a kiwi allergy was also invited to bring some kiwi along to an appointment with a very eminent consultant in the area. It seems to be a form of treatment that is gaining respect, though maybe ill-founded
It is a good form of treatment but as Prof Leader says in above quote:

Professor of histopathology at the Royal College of Surgeons and at Beaumont Hospital, Mary Leader, told the inquest that in (allopathic) medicine such desensitisation would not be carried out without strict supervision in a hospital where drugs, IV access, oxygen and a doctor were immediately available and she said no person should be tested for nut allergy without these. "If a patient has an acute anaphylactic reaction like this they are immediately treated with drugs to stop the reaction," she said.
I.e. : it is not a job for a quackpot/nutjob.

cYp
 

Mar Tweedy

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When it comes to allergy the only people i would trust are properly medically trained doctors - the consequences of mistakes are far too high to trust anyone else. However I'd hate anyone reading about this diy desensitisation to think that its all quack therapy. There is solid proper medical research being done into nut allergy desensitisation as a cure for nut allergy:

BBC NEWS | Health | Hope over peanut allergy 'cure'

but to do it without medical supervision is crazy.
 

cyberianpan

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When it comes to allergy the only people i would trust are properly medically trained doctors - the consequences of mistakes are far too high to trust anyone else. However I'd hate anyone reading about this diy desensitisation to think that its all quack therapy. There is solid proper medical research being done into nut allergy desensitisation as a cure for nut allergy:

BBC NEWS | Health | Hope over peanut allergy 'cure'

but to do it without medical supervision is crazy.
Indeed , and a quack trying diy desensitisation is like performing surgery in a fast food restaurant rather than a hospital operating theatre

cYp
 

cakeordeath

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I can not understand why this man was not in the care of a consultant immunologist.

These alternative health care providers should come with a warning.

My son is under the care of several consultants including a consultant immunologist.

Be warned.

If you have a severe allergic reaction or indeed any severe reaction to any allergen, see a consultant immunologist.

For anyone with a Type 1 (or immediate) hypersensitivity, go to a consultant. Type 1 means that the reaction will cause the excessive activation of certain white blood cells called mast cells and basophils by a type of antibody known as IgE.

I presume this man had his IgE levels tested by a doctor . But a misguided popular culture unfortunately led him in a different direction….. Alternative Practioner.

I cannot understand why this man didn’t carry medication.
People with peanut allergy must be prepared for a severe reaction at all times. They should carry an Epi pen (adrenaline) with them at all times. The adrenaline works to counteract anaphylaxis in case of a severe reaction to accidental peanut intake.

I am angry that the practitioner didn’t notice the mans symptoms and take prompt action, there and then. Why did he not have the appropriate medication.

The nature of anaphylaxis is such that the reaction can seem to be subsiding, but may recur throughout a prolonged period of time. The man should have been in a hospital.
My son is currently undergoing immunotherapy, he is treated AT THE HOSPITAL. His reactions are very severe and affect his internal organs.

Holistic hooha and a head massage would not save him. I Carry his medication everywhere. I ask all the questions when ordering for him and they swear there is no X or Y in the food. Then comes the big fuss as his eyes/lips/mouth/lips begin to swell and I’m reaching for my bag as the waitress panics and is apologising profusely. ‘The chef is very sorry , it seems that it’s a peanut based oil.’……

There are two types of test for assessing the presence of allergen-specific IgE antibodies RAST testing or Skin testing.

This man must have had either one or the other. Surely.

There have been enormous improvements in the medical treatments used to treat allergic conditions. Even for the eosinophilic diseases. ( my son)

Desensitization or hyposensitization is a treatment in which the patient is gradually vaccinated with progressively larger doses of the allergen in question. In a hospital setting. National and international guidelines confirm the clinical efficacy of injection as well as the safety, provided that recommendations are followed.

A second form of immunotherapy involves the intravenous injection of monoclonal anti-IgE antibodies ,however this should not be used in treating the majority of people with food allergies.

A third type, Sublingual immunotherapy, is an orally-administered therapy which takes advantage of oral immune tolerance to non-pathogenic antigens such as foods and resident bacteria. Again, under the supervision of an immunologist. And certainly with a history of anaphylaxis.

Allergy shot treatment is the closest thing to a ‘cure’ for allergic symptoms. This therapy requires a long-term commitment.


In alternative medicine, a number of allergy treatments are described by its practitioners, particularly naturopathic, herbal medicine, homeopathy, traditional Chinese medicine and applied kinesiology.

And tragically Thomas Schatten collapsed and died following his treatment.

Systematic literature searches conducted by the Mayo Clinic through 2006, involving hundreds of articles studying multiple conditions… showed no effectiveness of any alternative treatments…The authors concluded that, based on rigorous clinical trials of all types of homeopathy for childhood and adolescence ailments, there is no convincing evidence that supports the use of alternative treatments.

In the United States physicians who hold certification by the American Board of Allergy and Immunology (ABAI) have successfully completed an accredited educational program and an evaluation process. Becoming an allergist-immunologist requires completion of at least nine years of training. After completing medical school and graduating with a medical degree, a physician will then undergo three years of training in internal medicine or pediatrics .

In the UK, after obtaining postgraduate exams (MRCP or MRCPCH respectively) a doctor works as several years as a specialist registrar before qualifying for the General Medical Council specialist register.

In Ireland Similar.

To become a Kinesiologist? 2 year diploma in Cork
Kinesiology College of Ireland, Midleton, Co. Cork: Diploma Courses, Higher Diploma, Workshops, Single Modules, Short Courses

‘Kinesiology is the study of muscles, and the science of testing and balancing them to restore equilibrium.’
Kinesiologists take a holistic approach - they treat the whole person - mind, body, bio-chemistry and energy - not just parts. This highlights the unique position of Kinesiologists, who specialise in dealing with the whole person.

A quote for you!(Theirs, NOT MINE)

“Kinesiology Takes the guess work out of healthcare.”


...Poor man.
 
Last edited:

drzhivago

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All chiropractors are quack charlatans ( it is a cult) and should be hunted out like paedophiles.
have to disagree here as a doc

have used a number of them and have found some good, some useless

The difficulty is finding the good one
 


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