Dublin stacks to go ? eye sore or iconic



alonso

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Yeah, we'll get right on that city quarter.
well the plan is in place, or at draft stage/consultation. Poolbeg will be developed and arguably (most definitely) should have been developed before any of the thousand fields on the edges of a thousand villages were concreted over. It will take a long long time but it will be developed.

I would hope that the local people and their representatives can see the wisdom behind consolidation of the city and not merely oppose all change for the damn sake of it... there may be an argument to retain the towers (i don't see it) but there is no rational argument against developing Poolbeg
 

fergalr

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The towers could be incorporated easily into any masterplan. On a smaller scale, that gas ring out by Grand Canal dock was fantastically re-developed: albeit blandly. Regarding Sandymount Strand. I think the monumntal towers are what make Sandymount Strand. Certainly from Clontarf they look perfect across the water, framing the mountains.
 

alonso

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there is a certain scale to the towers that fit with the scale of the bay itself. The masterplan for Poolbeg in no way requires their demolition. What i object to is the labelling of any structure as "iconic" merely because it's been there a while and no one can imagine a place without it. Central Bank could be described as iconic as could Wood Quay for the same reasons.

I would rather see 2 40 storey office blocks marking out a new district of houses, apartments, employment, shops, parks, football pitches, cinemas, theatres etc etc.... ah one can only dream

Now where's Tom Morrissey when you need him

www.newheartfordublin.ie
 

imokyrok

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The towers could be incorporated easily into any masterplan. On a smaller scale, that gas ring out by Grand Canal dock was fantastically re-developed: albeit blandly. Regarding Sandymount Strand. I think the monumntal towers are what make Sandymount Strand. Certainly from Clontarf they look perfect across the water, framing the mountains.
I guess beauty is truly in the eye of the beholder. I used to live in Clontarf and work in sandymount and I always though it was a terrible blight on the areas.
 

Geekzilla

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Who remembers "the gasometer" (dustbin shaped structure) ?


It's hard to believe there was a campaign to retain that (or paint it like a pint of guinness iirc)?
I think there were three gasometers - one white and taller than wide, then the two red ones wider than tall - one of which had the metal framework now part of the aparment block (soon to be hotel).
I say knock the chimneys but replace them with some nice tall (iconic?) buildings.
I'll stick with the chimneys.
 

wombat

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The towers could be incorporated easily into any masterplan. On a smaller scale, that gas ring out by Grand Canal dock was fantastically re-developed: albeit blandly. Regarding Sandymount Strand. I think the monumntal towers are what make Sandymount Strand. Certainly from Clontarf they look perfect across the water, framing the mountains.
I doubt there will be many takers for apartments in a chimney. Beauty is definitely in the eye of the beholder, I have never got used to the sight of the 2 big barber poles sticking up in the middle of the bay.
 

fergalr

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I doubt there will be many takers for apartments in a chimney. Beauty is definitely in the eye of the beholder, I have never got used to the sight of the 2 big barber poles sticking up in the middle of the bay.
More's the pity for you. And any visit to the railings of Merrion Sq or Stephen's Green to see artists paintings and the frequency that the chimneys pop up as subjects would demonstrate the affection that people have for them.
 

wombat

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More's the pity for you. And any visit to the railings of Merrion Sq or Stephen's Green to see artists paintings and the frequency that the chimneys pop up as subjects would demonstrate the affection that people have for them.
Its hard to paint a view of the bay without them but I can't say they add anything. The new bridge looks well, I don't much fancy Liberty Hall but some of the new dockland buildings look quite well. Back to the chimneys - they're hardly worth preserving.
 

fergalr

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Its hard to paint a view of the bay without them but I can't say they add anything. The new bridge looks well, I don't much fancy Liberty Hall but some of the new dockland buildings look quite well. Back to the chimneys - they're hardly worth preserving.
You can't paint the bay looking north without them because you can barely see the northside apart from Howth - it's all so flat. Remove the only vertical element in the entire view and it's ruined somewhat.
 

alonso

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yeh they are a marker, but are they therefore worth preserving...

How about keeping them and developing a Museum of Irish Industry at the site with the towers as the centrepiece. Have we had enough Industry here? You could have lifts up the towers and a bridge between. Isn't the original Pigeon House generating station a protected structure?

Ah where's that ideas website when you need it (i stole the idea by the way, unless you like it)
 

alonso

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wombat

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I suggested previously that we replace them with 2 x 3MW wind turbines, about the same height and they would be a reminder to everyone of the scale of the job we have in switching to renewables - the existing oil fired station produces about 500 MW.
 

alonso

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y'see wombat that's the kernel of many of the arguments about these towers. Were you to dare propose wind turbines at this location - non-polluting, the same size etc. - you would be met with a barrage of abolutely earth shattering bile from the good burghers of Dublins 4, 2, 3 and 5. These chimneys would only be built over many many dead bodies in Dublin today yet somehow they are automtically worthy of preservation. Sure you can't get even 20 storeys in most of coastal Dublin, let alone 2 f'n chimneys (which is what they are after all)

Though it must be taken into account that wind turbines may have an impact on birds in the nature reserve etc - but it's not a bad idea at all and worthy of investigation - what better way to make a statement that Ireland is moving towards a secure and sustainable energy future than by sticking 2 turbines, at least, at the gateway to the capital so every single arrival by air and by sea will see what we're at, rather than some oul chimneys.

Anyone from ESB reading?
 

alonso

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I suggested previously that we replace them with 2 x 3MW wind turbines, about the same height and they would be a reminder to everyone of the scale of the job we have in switching to renewables - the existing oil fired station produces about 500 MW.
just read that properly, are you saying that Pigeon House produces more than 80 times the power that 2 turbines would?

Holy fck!!!
 

imokyrok

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y'see wombat that's the kernel of many of the arguments about these towers. Were you to dare propose wind turbines at this location - non-polluting, the same size etc. - you would be met with a barrage of abolutely earth shattering bile from the good burghers of Dublins 4, 2, 3 and 5. These chimneys would only be built over many many dead bodies in Dublin today yet somehow they are automtically worthy of preservation. Sure you can't get even 20 storeys in most of coastal Dublin, let alone 2 f'n chimneys (which is what they are after all)

Though it must be taken into account that wind turbines may have an impact on birds in the nature reserve etc - but it's not a bad idea at all and worthy of investigation - what better way to make a statement that Ireland is moving towards a secure and sustainable energy future than by sticking 2 turbines, at least, at the gateway to the capital so every single arrival by air and by sea will see what we're at, rather than some oul chimneys.

Anyone from ESB reading?





A larger version of something like this would be stunning.
http://www.inhabitat.com/2006/11/15/quiet-revolution-wind-turbine/quiterevolution-wind-turbine-main/

This link suggests that it might not be impossible to marry birdlife and wind turbines.
HowStuffWorks "Location, Location and Surface Area"
 

Ah Well

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Not being a Dub meself but having lived there for a number of years and having oft seen the stacks, personally I'd think they should remain
:)
 

tenderloins1

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They should remain, they are an integral part of the Dublin skyline.
They are not beautiful, but are a part of our visual heritage, just as Nelsons Pillar was to O'Connell street. They may not be a big hit with Tourists, but they remind me more of my home city than any Spire or statue could.
Over the years too many buildings of note in Dublin have been lost. Especially in the area of Industrial Heritage, which in a way is what these towers are.
They are also, as they were pre boom, a constant to many.
 

imokyrok

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We really really can't handle change in this country, can we!
 


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