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Dublin's tech tigerland - sham or real deal?


gaiusc

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Jul 21, 2009
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982
Economic crisis? What’s that? Young Europeans are flocking to Dublin to work in the mini boom town created by Facebook, Google, PayPal and others

Dublin 2013: a booming industry. Hundreds of young people signing contracts for new jobs with decent salaries. They have perks, bonuses and brilliant social lives. They recommend their friends for jobs, and they get hired too. Friday-night beers top off another great week. Here’s to the weekend, when they take off down the country to go surfing or pub-crawling in Cork and Galway.

Apparently some kind of economic crisis is going on, but in Dublin’s tech sector, where Facebook, Google, Twitter, LinkedIn, eBay, PayPal and Microsoft reign, the only way is up.
There is more...
 

Spanner Island

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Feb 22, 2011
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24,203
I don't think that depiction is wrong.

There are certain sectors which simply are not feeling the recession.

Property and everything associated with it has been the real cancer... raw materials, furniture, electrical goods, white goods, the banks etc. etc.... and obviously some knock on effect on retail generally due to large numbers of job losses etc.

There are plenty of people who didn't jump into the property madness however, and who are doing ok. There is also a generation coming up behind those who did jump into property. They have good jobs and no property yet. And if/when they do buy property they will get it at a reasonable price... providing we don't allow another bubble to develop.

It's the people who jumped into property and who are in negative equity who will be the lost generation...
 

Analyzer

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Feb 14, 2011
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46,201
IT has been in a bubble since Bernanke lowered interest rates at the onset of this crisis, and Trichet and Mervyn King followed suit.

There may be labour market shortages currently, but that could turn into oversupply.

In general Western Europe is not producing enough technology graduates, and too many arts graduates. It is part of the reason why there is high unemployment in Southern Europe. The graduate population is itself often trained in the wrong areas for economic growth/recovery.
 
L

longshortgrass

Its true. There was never a recession when it came to software in Dublin. The biggest problem is there were never enough people with the proper skills/experience.
The Dot Com Bubble frightened off the Mammies into sending their pets off to become teachers, security and pension.

Indigenous hiveoffs from software multinationals could provide unlimited upside...
 

freewillie

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Feb 3, 2013
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The main reason why the "young Europeans" are flocking here is that the young Irish are unable to speak the European continental languages necessary to service the European market. As a result they travel to the other side of the world to work in bars, on farms etc until their visas run out.
Surely with a bit of effort and encouragement they could spend a year or two in Germany, France etc building on the basic language skills they learned in secondary school and then be able to compete for the IT jobs at home or if not in IT be able to use your language skills with their other skills in Europe
 

Fo Real

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Mar 3, 2012
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944
It's a pity these jobs can't be filled with the local Irish. Three major universities in Dublin, along with numerous ITs, and we still have to import skilled workers from abroad. When will the government step in and stop squandering tax money funding mickey mouse humanities courses? Sex and Sexuality studies is an MA in DCU now apparently....ffs.
 

Spanner Island

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Feb 22, 2011
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24,203
The main reason why the "young Europeans" are flocking here is that the young Irish are unable to speak the European continental languages necessary to service the European market. As a result they travel to the other side of the world to work in bars, on farms etc until their visas run out.
Surely with a bit of effort and encouragement they could spend a year or two in Germany, France etc building on the basic language skills they learned in secondary school and then be able to compete for the IT jobs at home or if not in IT be able to use your language skills with their other skills in Europe
English is the international language of business and aviation etc.

The upshot for us is that we speak it fluently...

The downside for us is that we don't regard speaking other languages as being particularly important... whereas those who speak other languages think it very important to have a good grasp of English...

It's the same thing in Britain and the US... no real interest or importance attached to learning a foreign language... and in a way it's understandable... because if you learn German for example, you're pretty much limited to Germany whereas if you're German and you learn English it's much more widely usable...

Spanish, Russian and Chinese are probably the languages to learn...

And if we don't start learning languages the trends we see (foreign workers with strong English coming here to do jobs we can't) will continue...

And of course the continuing shambles that is 'free' third level education here is contributing to the mess too... with our 3rd level institutions increasingly starved of adequate funding and slipping further down the global rankings while tens of thousands of students do useless degrees which are of no use to anyone...
 
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moycullen14

Active member
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Feb 13, 2009
Messages
117
It's a pity these jobs can't be filled with the local Irish. Three major universities in Dublin, along with numerous ITs, and we still have to import skilled workers from abroad. When will the government step in and stop squandering tax money funding mickey mouse humanities courses? Sex and Sexuality studies is an MA in DCU now apparently....ffs.
Certainly if the jobs were purely 'technical' then language wouldn't be an issue. English is the lingua franca in the IT world. A lot of the work seems to be tech support and business development. Not that there is anything wrong with that, it's just IT skills + languages really aren't necessary.

It is very hard to become fluent in another language when your primary language is english.
 

Potatoeman

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Dec 6, 2010
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1,827
IT is varied and specialised, most of these jobs need people with experience and not someone out of college. IT is not doing as well as many people are saying there is a demand for programmers though the money seems decent look at some of the qualifications needed for the money offered. It's also all contract work at the moment.
 

Twin Towers

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Oct 14, 2005
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5,885
It's a pity these jobs can't be filled with the local Irish. Three major universities in Dublin, along with numerous ITs, and we still have to import skilled workers from abroad. When will the government step in and stop squandering tax money funding mickey mouse humanities courses? Sex and Sexuality studies is an MA in DCU now apparently....ffs.
If there are lots of jobs for IT within companies then there must also be plenty of scope for self employment. Courses encouraging entrepreneurship are a key.
 

gaiusc

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Jul 21, 2009
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982
How many people work in this sector? If we're talking 10,000, then it's a drop in the ocean but if it's 50,000-100,000 then it could make a big difference.
 

Picasso Republic

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May 31, 2011
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Most spoken Languages of the World - Nations Online Project

If you want to reach over 50% of the world's population, you need to have the following languages:

Chinese (all variants), Hindi, English, Spanish, Arabic (all variants), Russian, Bengali and Portuguese. Other significant languages are French, German, Japanese, Korean and Tai-Kadai.
Most of the tech and support organisations in Ireland provide support to either EMEA, EU Countries or Western Europe - Ireland does not provide helpdesk type support to India - its the other way round.

They base themselves in Ireland for tax and other reasons (their peers are in Irl also) - but also consolidation at a single location provides effeciencies.

They have no desire to employ Irish for many of the language specific jobs where they actually prefer to have a native speaker, however they will employ an Irish person who has word perfect unaccented French, German or Spanish. However as support is also provided to Estonia, Slovenia, Hungary, Slovakia, Denmark, Greece etc I dont believe the importing of native speakers with the correct IT skillsets from these countries is now a reason to damn the Irish Universities.
 

seabhcan

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Sep 3, 2007
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Picasso Republic

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