DUP : Brexit

McSlaggart

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The government has been urged to heed the warnings of the risk of civil disorder by loyalists in Northern Ireland because of the sense of betrayal they feel over Brexit.

The deputy leader of the Democratic Unionist party, Nigel Dodds, urged the government not to shrug off the impact of the Brexit deal on the unionist community.

You are really in danger here of causing real problems with the Belfast agreement, the St Andrew’s agreement, the political institutions and political stability in Northern Ireland by what you are doing to the unionist community,” he told the Brexit secretary, Stephen Barclay, during an hour-long exchange in the House of Commons over the Northern Ireland protocol of the deal. “Please wake up and realise what is happening here,” he said.



 


owedtojoy

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The government has been urged to heed the warnings of the risk of civil disorder by loyalists in Northern Ireland because of the sense of betrayal they feel over Brexit.

The deputy leader of the Democratic Unionist party, Nigel Dodds, urged the government not to shrug off the impact of the Brexit deal on the unionist community.

You are really in danger here of causing real problems with the Belfast agreement, the St Andrew’s agreement, the political institutions and political stability in Northern Ireland by what you are doing to the unionist community,” he told the Brexit secretary, Stephen Barclay, during an hour-long exchange in the House of Commons over the Northern Ireland protocol of the deal. “Please wake up and realise what is happening here,” he said.



Somewhere, John Redmond's ghost is laughing, or maybe weeping.

The only worry for me is that Leo Varadkar and the Irish Republic might be next. The Varadkar - Johnson bromance grates on me.

Varadkar saved Johnson and Brexit, but our "reward" of the Frontstop (i.e. the Backstop embedded in the Withdrawal Agreement) might turn to ashes. No one seems to know exactly how it will work, and it may well be Unworkable, like all the "technical solutions" the Brits have offered.
 

cytex

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Isnt the DUP the same people who said that there could be frictionless trade along the 300km pouris land border with a technology soloution to this with both states being in different customs zones . but some how a couple of ports is harder to have frictionless trade with ? Where is the fabled DUP technolgoy that is the solution to this border ? or were they lying and there is no technology ?

 

JacquesHughes

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DUP have got some explaining to do, to their community.

Like, why did they want Brexit in the first place?
Why were they so deaf when the community was screaming, ‘it’s an economic disaster’?
 

wombat

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DUP have got some explaining to do, to their community.
My opinion is that there are different interests east and west of the Bann. In the unionist heartland of Antrim and Down, they have little interaction with the south so the DUP preoccupation with the economic link to the UK is logical but once you cross the Bann, trade with the south becomes more important. The UUP should take a lesson from FFs tactic of playing to rural dissatisfaction with FG in 2016 and tell voters west of the Bann that the DUP only care about Antrim.
 

Se0samh

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The government has been urged to heed the warnings of the risk of civil disorder by loyalists in Northern Ireland because of the sense of betrayal they feel over Brexit.

The deputy leader of the Democratic Unionist party, Nigel Dodds, urged the government not to shrug off the impact of the Brexit deal on the unionist community.

You are really in danger here of causing real problems with the Belfast agreement, the St Andrew’s agreement, the political institutions and political stability in Northern Ireland by what you are doing to the unionist community,” he told the Brexit secretary, Stephen Barclay, during an hour-long exchange in the House of Commons over the Northern Ireland protocol of the deal. “Please wake up and realise what is happening here,” he said.




Indeed...

 

james toney

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They told business leaders in NI to fcuk off for 3 years...ignored all their warnings....and now are saying people should heed what business is saying.
The DUP are not only corrupt bigots...they are also insane and very foolish.
 

raetsel

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Isnt the DUP the same people who said that there could be frictionless trade along the 300km pouris land border with a technology soloution to this with both states being in different customs zones . but some how a couple of ports is harder to have frictionless trade with ? Where is the fabled DUP technolgoy that is the solution to this border ? or were they lying and there is no technology ?
Exactly..............
The capacity for innovation in the setting up of internal technology-based checks within the UK itself is surely infinitely more adaptable
than any arrangement needing the approval of 27 other states. The tech based solution for the border which the DUP talked up for ages was of course always a deliberate deception, which they knew could never work, but of course they thought was good enough for the southern Paddies.
It has come as a shock that Boris has taken the decision that it is good enough for the unionist Paddies in the north as well.
Rather comically, now we have Nigel Dodds as well, without the slightest hint of irony, warning us to expect trouble from loyalist paramilitaries as a consequence of this particular outcome of Brexit. It is only just over three short years ago that he was calling out Tony Blair and John Major for "irresponsible behaviour" for doing exactly the same thing in respect of the dissidents.

The DUP have been allowed to blissfully escape being called out on their contradictions and hypocrisy by many within the media since their formation in 1971.
Earlier this week we witnessed Arlene Foster bewailing the introduction of abortion rights in Northern Ireland. Whereas back in the 1990s at a Young UUP event, Arlene Kelly, as she was then, excoriated the Republic of Ireland for the denial of precisely those same rights.
Their most outrageous hypocrisy is to pose as an anti-terrorism party, yet they have been linked closely to loyalist murder gangs since they were founded by Ian Paisley, who himself was deeply implicated in such activity going right back to the mid 1960s.
 

McSlaggart

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Varadkar saved Johnson and Brexit, but our "reward" of the Frontstop (i.e. the Backstop embedded in the Withdrawal Agreement) might turn to ashes. No one seems to know exactly how it will work, and it may well be Unworkable, like all the "technical solutions" the Brits have offered.

I would agree with you that it may all be unworkable. I do not think their is a good solution to this particular problem.
 

AhNowStop

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My opinion is that there are different interests east and west of the Bann. In the unionist heartland of Antrim and Down, they have little interaction with the south so the DUP preoccupation with the economic link to the UK is logical but once you cross the Bann, trade with the south becomes more important. The UUP should take a lesson from FFs tactic of playing to rural dissatisfaction with FG in 2016 and tell voters west of the Bann that the DUP only care about Antrim.
Farmers and businessmen (nat or unionist) east of the ban face exactly the same issues (re Brexit, esp a no deal brexit) as those west of the ban..

the fact is that the DUP wanted a hard border to break as many links to the south as possible and to break the GFA .. it really is as simple as that .. further analogy is not required.
 

Eire1976

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The government has been urged to heed the warnings of the risk of civil disorder by loyalists in Northern Ireland because of the sense of betrayal they feel over Brexit.

The deputy leader of the Democratic Unionist party, Nigel Dodds, urged the government not to shrug off the impact of the Brexit deal on the unionist community.

You are really in danger here of causing real problems with the Belfast agreement, the St Andrew’s agreement, the political institutions and political stability in Northern Ireland by what you are doing to the unionist community,” he told the Brexit secretary, Stephen Barclay, during an hour-long exchange in the House of Commons over the Northern Ireland protocol of the deal. “Please wake up and realise what is happening here,” he said.



Poor Loyalists, not being made a special deal of, must make them really really upset.
 

Mickeymac

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Farmers and businessmen (nat or unionist) east of the ban face exactly the same issues (re Brexit, esp a no deal brexit) as those west of the ban..

the fact is that the DUP wanted a hard border to break as many links to the south as possible and to break the GFA .. it really is as simple as that .. further analogy is not required.

Hopefully those whose heads have been buried in the sand for yonks, now see the error of their past thoughts.
 

Mickeymac

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The government has been urged to heed the warnings of the risk of civil disorder by loyalists in Northern Ireland because of the sense of betrayal they feel over Brexit.

The deputy leader of the Democratic Unionist party, Nigel Dodds, urged the government not to shrug off the impact of the Brexit deal on the unionist community.

You are really in danger here of causing real problems with the Belfast agreement, the St Andrew’s agreement, the political institutions and political stability in Northern Ireland by what you are doing to the unionist community,” he told the Brexit secretary, Stephen Barclay, during an hour-long exchange in the House of Commons over the Northern Ireland protocol of the deal. “Please wake up and realise what is happening here,” he said.






Well, we can’t say we haven’t been warned. The Chief Constable of the PSNI Simon Byrne has warned us, as has an even more authoritative voice, that of Jamie Bryson. If Boris’s withdrawal deal goes ahead, maintaining an invisible border in Ireland, there will probably be public disorder and even violence from loyalists.
Jamie was asked – by Stephen Nolan, I think – why loyalists couldn’t or wouldn’t seek to address any grievances through the ballot box. Let them elect representatives and resolve their problems through normal political channels. Jamie replied by comparing potential loyalist demonstrations to the civil rights movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. The people resorted to other means than the ballot box to address their concerns then, so why shouldn’t loyalists do the same now?
Jamie, Jamie, Jamie. Your analogy is a false one. The civil rights movement back in the last century was about addressing the political corruption of the previous fifty years, when gerrymander and discrimination meant that nationalists were kept well away from any administrative or legal powers. In addition, it was the local government in Stormont – the Ulster Unionist party – which made sure nationalists were politically castrated. ….read on folks.
 

wombat

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Farmers and businessmen (nat or unionist) east of the ban face exactly the same issues (re Brexit, esp a no deal brexit) as those west of the ban..
How many Antrim farmers ship milk to the republic?
 

Rocky

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Somewhere, John Redmond's ghost is laughing, or maybe weeping.

The only worry for me is that Leo Varadkar and the Irish Republic might be next. The Varadkar - Johnson bromance grates on me.

Varadkar saved Johnson and Brexit, but our "reward" of the Frontstop (i.e. the Backstop embedded in the Withdrawal Agreement) might turn to ashes. No one seems to know exactly how it will work, and it may well be Unworkable, like all the "technical solutions" the Brits have offered.
He did, but he also saved himself/Ireland. May's deal was better for Ireland. It was also a lot better for the DUP and they were incredibly stupid in opposing it. It probably wouldn't have passed anyway, as the ERG's issue with it wasn't the backstop, but how it tied the UK to the EU, but I would still have more sympathy for the DUP if they had backed May's deal.

Varadkar's problem though was that Johnston would never have agreed to May's deal (he couldn't and he couldn't pass it either) and if Varadkar didn't compromise we easily could have ended up with a no-deal, which would have been an absolute disaster for Ireland. It's easy to side now that would never have happened, but it was a definite risk.

It also appears to be the case that the "technical solutions" will apply to the goods crossing the Irish sea. The no border seems to be very solid on the Irish side. The DUP know this too and their concerns are understandable. For their own sake it's just a pity it took them so longer to realise how weak they were and that's always been a problem with Unionism. They are paranoid about the wrong things.
 

wombat

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Do you think milk, beef & lambs from farmers east of the ban is treated differently than from farmers west of the ban?
Yes, it depends on what contracts the local creamery has, same reason why some northern milk is processed south of the border. My point is that the further you get from the border, the less interaction there is with the south.
 

Mickeymac

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Yes, it depends on what contracts the local creamery has, same reason why some northern milk is processed south of the border. My point is that the further you get from the border, the less interaction there is with the south.



Got it now😂……..the reason why DUP want trade deals with Timbucktoo.
 

owedtojoy

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He did, but he also saved himself/Ireland. May's deal was better for Ireland. It was also a lot better for the DUP and they were incredibly stupid in opposing it. It probably wouldn't have passed anyway, as the ERG's issue with it wasn't the backstop, but how it tied the UK to the EU, but I would still have more sympathy for the DUP if they had backed May's deal.

Varadkar's problem though was that Johnston would never have agreed to May's deal (he couldn't and he couldn't pass it either) and if Varadkar didn't compromise we easily could have ended up with a no-deal, which would have been an absolute disaster for Ireland. It's easy to side now that would never have happened, but it was a definite risk.

It also appears to be the case that the "technical solutions" will apply to the goods crossing the Irish sea. The no border seems to be very solid on the Irish side. The DUP know this too and their concerns are understandable. For their own sake it's just a pity it took them so longer to realise how weak they were and that's always been a problem with Unionism. They are paranoid about the wrong things.
I would like to see this deal pass in preference to no-deal, but there are still concerns about how it will work.

If the British renege and fail to protect the single market, it will be a massive problem for the ROI and the EU.

And trust in the promises of the British Government are not very high right now. Ask Nigel Dodds.
 


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