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Dutch General Election 2017 - Can Geert Wilders become Prime-Minister?


GDPR

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'Wrapped' means covering the head (and in some cases some or all of the face as well). Basically we are talking about women who follow the Muslim dress code to varying degrees. It is a fairly good indicator of the conformism or otherwise of the society with Islamic strictures.
Covering the face would still be very unusual in Turkey. Up until recently no Irishwoman would leave the house without her head scarf, and it certainly was not considered appropriate to flash bare arms, legs or low neck lines.

Standards of public modesty vary in different societies.
 

picador

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Covering the face would still be very unusual in Turkey. Up until recently no Irishwoman would leave the house without her head scarf, and it certainly was not considered appropriate to flash bare arms, legs or low neck lines.
Crazy talk.
 

Drogheda445

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Covering the face would still be very unusual in Turkey. Up until recently no Irishwoman would leave the house without her head scarf, and it certainly was not considered appropriate to flash bare arms, legs or low neck lines.

Standards of public modesty vary in different societies.
A lot of the changes regarding public modesty (read Muslim dress code), which used to be largely restricted to certain areas of the Middle East, can be chalked up to the support Islamism received in the late 20th century under the auspices of anti-communist (and by extension anti-Baathist) American foreign policy. Obviously the links to the success of the Taliban are well known but it can largely be thanked for the popularity of conservative, Wahhabi-inspired Islam more generally today.

Veil-wearing in the Middle East goes back at least to the Babylonians anyway so culturally it long predates Islam, although a literal reading of the Koran certainly encourages women to dress "modestly".
 

west'sawake

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They can push for all they want. Doesn't mean they'll get it.

It is already, de jure, in operation, is it not, in Muslim enclaves/ghettoes in many cities across Europe? With civil authorities turning a blind eye.
 
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Smidgin

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It is already, de jure, in operation, is it not, in Muslim enclaves/ghettoes in many cities across Europe? With civil authorities turning a blind eye.
We won't turn any blind eye down here because we don't want any Dubs coming with their smart talk and lose weemen turning the heads of our healthy lads.
 

Smidgin

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Covering the face would still be very unusual in Turkey. Up until recently no Irishwoman would leave the house without her head scarf, and it certainly was not considered appropriate to flash bare arms, legs or low neck lines.

Standards of public modesty vary in different societies.
Cork's reaction to the Muslim veil

according to Sakinah (formerly Carol) Nagle, a Dubliner who converted to Islam over 25 years ago and who now lives in Bishopstown in Cork: “I know lots of Muslim women who wear face veils and none are forced to do so,” she says.


As to why some Irish Muslim women wear niqabs , Nagle was in no doubt: “Some wear them to protect their modesty. Others do it for God.”

Cork's reaction to the Muslim veil | Irish Examiner

Why this issue raises so many heckles is a mystery.
 

Trampas

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Cork's reaction to the Muslim veil

according to Sakinah (formerly Carol) Nagle, a Dubliner who converted to Islam over 25 years ago and who now lives in Bishopstown in Cork: “I know lots of Muslim women who wear face veils and none are forced to do so,” she says.


As to why some Irish Muslim women wear niqabs , Nagle was in no doubt: “Some wear them to protect their modesty. Others do it for God.”
...but most do it in order to make a political statement. That statement says.......We are here. Our numbers are increasing rapidly. Things are going to be different around here. p.s. Suck it up.





Why this issue raises so many heckles is a mystery.
Clearly you are easily mystified. Must be all that "heckling".
 

amist4

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Cork's reaction to the Muslim veil

according to Sakinah (formerly Carol) Nagle, a Dubliner who converted to Islam over 25 years ago and who now lives in Bishopstown in Cork: “I know lots of Muslim women who wear face veils and none are forced to do so,” she says.


As to why some Irish Muslim women wear niqabs , Nagle was in no doubt: “Some wear them to protect their modesty. Others do it for God.”

Cork's reaction to the Muslim veil | Irish Examiner

Why this issue raises so many heckles is a mystery.
Can you think of any reason why the balaclava isn't popular?
 

midlander12

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Covering the face would still be very unusual in Turkey. Up until recently no Irishwoman would leave the house without her head scarf, and it certainly was not considered appropriate to flash bare arms, legs or low neck lines.

Standards of public modesty vary in different societies.
Recently? Maybe the early 1960's!!! And I hardly think that the Ireland of that era is a positive point of reference! Anyway, at least at that stage Ireland had slowly but surely started to move forward, whereas Turkey is headed at full steam back to the Middle Ages.
 

Trampas

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Recently? Maybe the early 1960's!!! And I hardly think that the Ireland of that era is a positive point of reference! Anyway, at least at that stage Ireland had slowly but surely started to move forward, whereas Turkey is headed at full steam back to the Middle Ages.

Make that the early 50s. And of course back in the 1930s very few men would be seen without a hat.
 

GDPR

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It's certain now that Wilders will not be a part of any coalition government in the Netherlands. Currently VVD, D66, CDA and GroenLinks are engaged in talks about forming a new coalition government.

Interesting times ahead as Groenlinks and the VVD are not the most natural partners, but good to see that Wilders has been 'officially' excluded from governance.
 

Breanainn

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It's certain now that Wilders will not be a part of any coalition government in the Netherlands. Currently VVD, D66, CDA and GroenLinks are engaged in talks about forming a new coalition government.

Interesting times ahead as Groenlinks and the VVD are not the most natural partners, but good to see that Wilders has been 'officially' excluded from governance.
Always the most probable coalition outcome, though perhaps surprising on the Greens' account, given that Labour were eviscerated for being a junior partner.
 

GDPR

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Always the most probable coalition outcome, though perhaps surprising on the Greens' account, given that Labour were eviscerated for being a junior partner.
Not necessarily, replacing GL with CU was also a highly plausible outcome (and a more logical combination ideologically) - but CU stepped back and felt like GL should have a first go at it given the number of seats they won.
 

jmcc

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Always the most probable coalition outcome, though perhaps surprising on the Greens' account, given that Labour were eviscerated for being a junior partner.
There's a certain true believer demographic that keeps the Greens motoring along. As "Labour" parties move up the social ladder, they tend to lose a lot of their earlier true believers and working class demographics. This is why, in Ireland, the Greens surprised the talking monkeys in the media in the last GE.
 

GDPR

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Interestingly, the speaker (or president, or chairwoman, whatever the correct English term is in this context) of the Lower House of the Dutch parliament will remain a member of the PvdA (Labor).
 

TheWexfordInn

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Covering the face would still be very unusual in Turkey. Up until recently no Irishwoman would leave the house without her head scarf, and it certainly was not considered appropriate to flash bare arms, legs or low neck lines.

Standards of public modesty vary in different societies.
What sh*te is this? Are you claiming that some priests were claiming that Irish women leaving their house without a headscarf were "uncovered meat" as some Imams are stating today or that head-uncovered women were being arrested by the religious Police as they are today in various countries where the Koran forms the constitution?

You are a cultural relativist arsehole
 

GDPR

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Interesting development: Negotiations to form a coalition between the VVD, CDA, D66 and GroenLinks have just collapsed. Not much is known yet aside from the fact that they collapsed over the topic of immigration.

I wouldn't be surprised if coalition talks between VVD, CDA, D66 and CU would now begin, but that assumes that D66 didn't pull out of the negotiations while GroenLinks did. Interesting times.
 
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