DVD/Blu-Ray or Downloading?

blokesbloke

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 13, 2011
Messages
22,697
Well my dears, I have finally given in and bought myself into the 21st century with a flat TV. Until this year I was still managing with an elderly 21-inch Sony CRT TV (the type with the fat back as Stewie from Family Guy has it).

Anyway my mother's even more elderly CRT TV blew up so I offered her mine as an excuse to get a new TV.

I now have a nice 40 inch Samsung 4k TV with all the various catch-up services, and I am fortunate they have installed super-fast broadband into my block so I have a 1Gb/sec broadband connection to plug it into.

Now, I am so old-fashioned that I still had a VCR connected to the old Sony, which I rarely used but I do have some old tapes which were never released on DVD which I liked to watch sometimes.

Anyway it was a bugger to get a VCR connected to the new TV, but after much internet research I managed - but the picture quality was dreadful - partly because of course I'm used to DVD now but I think also because the way you have to connect a VCR to a modern TV degrades the picture quality even more.

To make it worse my favourite tape snapped inside the VCR - whether that was because the tape was ancient or the VCR I am not sure.

So anyway I now just have my new telly and my old DVD player now. The DVD player is so old it only has SCART but I have managed to connect it up too and the picture quality is still acceptable if not great, and my old DVD player is multi-region from when Amazon used to sell them and I have a few Region 1 DVDs.

As I now have a 4k TV I was looking at Blu-Ray players - apparently DVD is normal quality, Blu-Ray gives you HD and there's UHD Blu-Rays which would give me 4k output.

However again I want to watch my region 1 DVDs, so I would have to buy a Blu-Ray or Ultra Blu-Ray player which was at least DVD multi-region and they are a fair whack - fully multi-region Blu-Ray or Ultra Blu-Ray are even more, though I have found a website which seems to be an established and respected firm who do sell them.

Anyway I still have loads of DVD box sets I haven't even watched yet so there's no great rush for a new player.

It did make me realise though how limited even DVDs (which still seem quite new and high-tech to me - don't laugh!) not in terms of picture quality, which I still think looks damn good, but in terms of storage.

When I binge-watch my DVDs I can only get 4 - 5 episodes per DVD then I have to get up, put the old DVD back in its box, put the new one in etc.

And I course all those DVDs take up a lot of room (though I still appreciate how I can fit 2.5 DVD cases in the space an old VHS tape used to take!).

I was reading an article which said that modern young people buying their first place didn't need as much room as before as they don't have big collections of CDs, DVDs, Blu-Rays etc. and even books with eBooks.

I have a tiny, tiny flat. I am not giving up printed books, but I have to admit I am beginning to see the benefit of digital downloads and/or streaming.

Obviously I have a fast enough internet connection that I can download and stream without issue (and no download limit) so that's not an issue or an advantage.

I wouldn't mind paying to stream something I wouldn't watch again, but I tend to re-watch shows I love, especially sitcoms, hence the DVDs.

So I thinking... is it time to get with the programme and start buying my TV shows as digital downloads?

The trouble is I want to be sure that I truly own them, and I feel if I buy them via services I am not sure if I really will.

For example, if I buy a season of Family Guy from Amazon Prime Video, will it always be linked to my Amazon account and I'll always have to watch it via that?

If I buy it from iTunes, will I always have to sign in with my iTunes account to watch?

Or are there services where I can literally buy a download copy and it's mine - just put it on my hard drive and it's mine forever to watch on any media player I choose?

Then what about backups? Would it let me make a back-up copy? If not, then presumably if my hard drive goes all my digital downloads go with them?

If I can redownload them from the original service, again it depends on that service always being there and always having an account with them.

Perhaps I should stick to DVDs and perhaps in time Blu-Rays?
 


blokesbloke

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 13, 2011
Messages
22,697
Well my dears, I have finally given in and bought myself into the 21st century with a flat TV. Until this year I was still managing with an elderly 21-inch Sony CRT TV (the type with the fat back as Stewie from Family Guy has it).

Anyway my mother's even more elderly CRT TV blew up so I offered her mine as an excuse to get a new TV.

I now have a nice 40 inch Samsung 4k TV with all the various catch-up services, and I am fortunate they have installed super-fast broadband into my block so I have a 1Gb/sec broadband connection to plug it into.

Now, I am so old-fashioned that I still had a VCR connected to the old Sony, which I rarely used but I do have some old tapes which were never released on DVD which I liked to watch sometimes.

Anyway it was a bugger to get a VCR connected to the new TV, but after much internet research I managed - but the picture quality was dreadful - partly because of course I'm used to DVD now but I think also because the way you have to connect a VCR to a modern TV degrades the picture quality even more.

To make it worse my favourite tape snapped inside the VCR - whether that was because the tape was ancient or the VCR I am not sure.

So anyway I now just have my new telly and my old DVD player now. The DVD player is so old it only has SCART but I have managed to connect it up too and the picture quality is still acceptable if not great, and my old DVD player is multi-region from when Amazon used to sell them and I have a few Region 1 DVDs.

As I now have a 4k TV I was looking at Blu-Ray players - apparently DVD is normal quality, Blu-Ray gives you HD and there's UHD Blu-Rays which would give me 4k output.

However again I want to watch my region 1 DVDs, so I would have to buy a Blu-Ray or Ultra Blu-Ray player which was at least DVD multi-region and they are a fair whack - fully multi-region Blu-Ray or Ultra Blu-Ray are even more, though I have found a website which seems to be an established and respected firm who do sell them.

Anyway I still have loads of DVD box sets I haven't even watched yet so there's no great rush for a new player.

It did make me realise though how limited even DVDs (which still seem quite new and high-tech to me - don't laugh!) not in terms of picture quality, which I still think looks damn good, but in terms of storage.

When I binge-watch my DVDs I can only get 4 - 5 episodes per DVD then I have to get up, put the old DVD back in its box, put the new one in etc.

And I course all those DVDs take up a lot of room (though I still appreciate how I can fit 2.5 DVD cases in the space an old VHS tape used to take!).

I was reading an article which said that modern young people buying their first place didn't need as much room as before as they don't have big collections of CDs, DVDs, Blu-Rays etc. and even books with eBooks.

I have a tiny, tiny flat. I am not giving up printed books, but I have to admit I am beginning to see the benefit of digital downloads and/or streaming.

Obviously I have a fast enough internet connection that I can download and stream without issue (and no download limit) so that's not an issue or an advantage.

I wouldn't mind paying to stream something I wouldn't watch again, but I tend to re-watch shows I love, especially sitcoms, hence the DVDs.

So I thinking... is it time to get with the programme and start buying my TV shows as digital downloads?

The trouble is I want to be sure that I truly own them, and I feel if I buy them via services I am not sure if I really will.

For example, if I buy a season of Family Guy from Amazon Prime Video, will it always be linked to my Amazon account and I'll always have to watch it via that?

If I buy it from iTunes, will I always have to sign in with my iTunes account to watch?

Or are there services where I can literally buy a download copy and it's mine - just put it on my hard drive and it's mine forever to watch on any media player I choose?

Then what about backups? Would it let me make a back-up copy? If not, then presumably if my hard drive goes all my digital downloads go with them?

If I can redownload them from the original service, again it depends on that service always being there and always having an account with them.

Perhaps I should stick to DVDs and perhaps in time Blu-Rays?
:(
 
D

Deleted member 45466

DVDs looks good on the B ray player (depends on the quality of the player you get) Blokey.

It doesn't have the same super dooper "it's like I'm there fighting storm troopers in the Battle of Endor" as a blu ray (then again that also depends on the blu ray - some of them are uber sh@t).

Stick with the DVDs for now, and maybe buy a good quality blu ray to start off? A criterion collection blu ray perhaps?

(Don't have a clue about downloading movies, sorry! Personally, I like having something physical to pull out and stick in the slim black box in the living room - ahem.)

PS: Panasonic male a very good blu ray player. I recommend it because its the one I have! I'll put details on this thread at the weekend.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

ShinnerBot No.32564844524

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 29, 2013
Messages
4,043
Plastic and foil in your standard cd/dvd/bluray is a terrible form of data encapsulation subject to decay over time and scratching.

Your TV is probably already set up to take on-demand services such Netflix, etc.

Afaik, you "pretty much" legally hold the right(well they'd have a harder time getting a judge to sentence you in the circumstances) to the copyright material as per the box sets/DVD's you already own, so in essence, you should be able to download torrents if you want for what you already bought.

So, grab a buddy and make them your tech-bitch(Oh the joys of being technically skilled!) and get them to help you start downloading all your valued box sets to an external hardrive plugged in to an android tv box. A good android TV box will have "chromecast" built in, meaning you can use your smartphone as a remote of sorts to stream youtube, netflix and a whole host of others to your telly.

All horribly complicated, such is modern life, but I'm sure there's a metaphor for Brexit in there somewhere. :p

Best of luck BB.
 

TedHankey

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 3, 2014
Messages
1,061
They are not legal.

I love the hypocrisy of so many do-goody millennials who don't blink an eye at stealing content from artists.
Where are torrents illegal?
 

blokesbloke

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 13, 2011
Messages
22,697
Torrents aren't illegal in themselves but downloading copyrightedd content without permission from them is.
 


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