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Early childhood intervention can prevent a lifetime of dependency with autism

patslatt

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See summary http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21696944-how-not-squander-potential-autistic-people-beautiful-minds-wasted and main article Spectrum shift | The Economist

Maybe the most interesting point in this article and its summary is that early childhood intervention can prevent a lifetime of dependency with autism. Purely from a financial cost viewpoint, it is sheer folly to provide autistic children with inadequate services because of the enormous cost of preventable lifetime dependency. Going by radio interviews of parents of autistic children, Irish health services could be doing a lot more for them.
 
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autiemom

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See summary Beautiful minds, wasted | The Economist and main article Spectrum shift | The Economist

Maybe the most interesting point in this article and its summary is that early childhood intervention can prevent a lifetime of dependency with autism. Purely from a financial cost viewpoint, it is sheer folly to provide autistic children with inadequate services because of the enormous cost of preventable lifetime dependency. Going by radio interviews of parents of autistic children, Irish health services could be doing a lot more for them.
Most parents who receive a diagnosis of asd for their child are in for a huge struggle to get ANY services, the best advice is given by groups set up by parents of asd kids who fight constantly for every morsel of provision given. Its a lonely time which wreaks havoc on family relationships, and tests friendships to the limit. Most parents willingly fund OT speech and language psychological services privately in the race to give their child the best possible outcome, but as always people who cant afford 60 to 100 euro an hour three times a week for ONE of these services, suffer greatly. Ireland Fails miserably again to support another very vulnerable group in society.
 

patslatt

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Most parents who receive a diagnosis of asd for their child are in for a huge struggle to get ANY services, the best advice is given by groups set up by parents of asd kids who fight constantly for every morsel of provision given. Its a lonely time which wreaks havoc on family relationships, and tests friendships to the limit. Most parents willingly fund OT speech and language psychological services privately in the race to give their child the best possible outcome, but as always people who cant afford 60 to 100 euro an hour three times a week for ONE of these services, suffer greatly. Ireland Fails miserably again to support another very vulnerable group in society.
The government prioritises things like tax free lump sums for the public sector,worth hundreds of thousands for top people.
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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On your other thread, you described the payment of pensions and lump sums to public servants, as theft, because people paying tax were forced to do so, even if they disagreed with money being spent that way.

So, using your logic, taking money from taxes to give to autistic children is theft.

However, given that your OP treats this as a financial decision, rather than it simply being the right thing to do, then maybe you aren't being entirely inconsistent. All about the money for you, Pat.
 

Barroso

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The government prioritises things like tax free lump sums for the public sector,worth hundreds of thousands for top people.
More like special contracts worth hundreds of millions of euros for their favorite tax emigrant I think.
 
D

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You would think speech therapists etc. Would offer their services for free, since it's so important.
 

Radix

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[video=youtube;1qPFAT4p8Lc]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qPFAT4p8Lc[/video]



Here's how someone with a 'differently abled brain' has proven that early intervention works. She didn't speak until almost four years of age, and now is a world renowned expert in a field of very few. She was named by Time Magazine as one of the top 100 influential people in the world for her work.



[video=youtube;rZb9ctd3Atw]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZb9ctd3Atw[/video]



And to those who think that Ireland does little to help in this area, you are very wrong. The Department of Education trains and educates Special Needs Assistants, and draws externally from the resources of such eminent people as Professor Nick Hodge from the UK, who holds the dignity of the human person at the centre of all of his discourse.

https://acertheblog.wordpress.com/2016/03/31/interview-with-professor-nick-hodge/
 

patslatt

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On your other thread, you described the payment of pensions and lump sums to public servants, as theft, because people paying tax were forced to do so, even if they disagreed with money being spent that way.

So, using your logic, taking money from taxes to give to autistic children is theft.

However, given that your OP treats this as a financial decision, rather than it simply being the right thing to do, then maybe you aren't being entirely inconsistent. All about the money for you, Pat.
LEGALISED THEFT

I don't regard autism treatment as a financial decision, pointing out in the headline that early intervention works well.

Tax free lump sums based on vastly overpaid public sector pay 48% higher than the private sector average pay is legalised theft. The Irish public sector is about the highest paid in the EU, not bad for a debt ridden government.

Most taxpayers wouldn't object to taxes being spent wisely on public sector wages and pensions, as opposed to buying off public sector unions for political gain. However, the public sector should fund its own pensions.

I made a distinction between private pensions fully funded by savings and public sector pensions for the top half of pay funded largely at taxpayers' expense through compulsory taxes.
 
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autiemom

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Radix quote 'And to those who think that Ireland does little to help in this area, you are very wrong. The Department of Education trains and educates Special Needs Assistants, and draws externally from the resources of such eminent people as Professor Nick Hodge from the UK, who holds the dignity of the human person at the centre of all of his discourse.'

Radix
I have two children on both end of the spectrum, have previously worked in several asd facilities and I'm sorry you are wrong, there is minimal input from the departments. Add to that moratoriums on hse employment for ot's speech and language therapists psychologists and psychiatrists, the wait list to even see a professional can be on average 11 to 24 months, depending on what part of the country you live in. Have asd services improved since the 90's? yes, but minimally so, stats(if you can get/believe the accuracy) now say its 1 in 68 births, think about that............... 1 in 68 children born will have a diagnosis of asd. The dep. of education does little to open units especially at secondary level, parents are at the mercy of benevolent schools to volunteer to open units, yes the dep. has stated that all new build schools MUST have asd provision, but it is essentially up to the school to follow through, also given the sparse new builds its a little bit of a moot point. existing established schools are under no obligation to provide an asd class, regardless of the need in the area for children, wait list for aba specific classes are a joke, my 11 year old has been on several waitlists since she was 7, still waiting.....
gaelscoils are worse and No private school will accept a child with an asd diagnosis.
 
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patslatt

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More like special contracts worth hundreds of millions of euros for their favorite tax emigrant I think.
Irish domestic business owners are among the most highly taxed in the EU but don't get good value for their taxes in advanced welfare state services. THis high taxation may explain why the indigeneous Irish industries are far from developing their full potential,leading to the reliance on multinationals.
 
D

Deleted member 34656

Thank you for the free advice general mayhem.

:)
Anytime. I'm here to help :)

Do you know that joke about the child who didn't speak till he was ten?

One day out of the blue at dinner he suddenly says 'can you pass the salt, please'.

The parents are astonished and, when they recover from their surprise, they ask the child 'you can speak? How come you never said anything before?'

The child says 'well, everything's been alright up until now'.
 

patslatt

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And to those who think that Ireland does little to help in this area, you are very wrong. The Department of Education trains and educates Special Needs Assistants, and draws externally from the resources of such eminent people as Professor Nick Hodge from the UK, who holds the dignity of the human person at the centre of all of his discourse.

I have two children on both end of the spectrum, have previously worked in several asd facilities and I'm sorry you are wrong, there is minimal input from the departments. Add to that moratoriums on hse employment for ot's speech and language therapists psychologists and psychiatrists, the wait list to even see a professional can be on average 11 to 24 months, depending on what part of the country you live in. Have asd services improved since the 90's? yes, but minimally so, stats(if you can get/believe the accuracy) now say its 1 in 68 births, think about that............... 1 in 68 children born will have a diagnosis of asd. The dep. of education does little to open units especially at secondary level, parents are at the mercy of benevolent schools to volunteer to open units, yes the dep. has stated that all new build schools MUST have asd provision, but it is essentially up to the school to follow through, also given the sparse new builds its a little bit of a moot point. existing established schools are under no obligation to provide an asd class, regardless of the need in the area for children, wait list for aba specific classes are a joke, my 11 year old has been on several waitlists since she was 7, still waiting.....
gaelscoils are worse and No private school will accept a child with an asd diagnosis.
The opening sentence contradicts the rest of the post. Have you overlooked that?
 

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