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Eilis O'Hanlon, Donald Trump and Hating America

Malbekh

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Apr 30, 2009
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3,012
So, la O'Hanlon has a fluffy nonsense piece in The Sindo about how The Left are ganging up on The Donald for political reasons rather than any concern that Trump will end up being the next Benito Mussolini. As an example, she correctly contrasts Trump's previous history as celebrity business man compared to Clinton's warmongering policies as First Lady, Senator and then Secretary of State. There is a tiny amount at the end that this is all about the Irish left hating America, or I guess American foreign policy, although she doesn't have any empirical evidence and just tacks that last statement on to her meandering, useless arguments. Fair enough. The problem that la O'Hanlon fails to realise, along with certain residents in West Clare, is that Trump is actually the biggest threat this nation faces in the next few months if elected, and the biggest threat for the damage he will do in the four years (at least) after that.

A Trump president would be a critical disaster to this nation on three broad based arguments.

The Undocumented

Trump has made it clear he wants to make America great again, or perhaps, slightly less crap. One of the ways he can achieve this, apart from laughable ideas about walls, is to crack down on illegal immigration. For sure his focus will be on people of a different colour, different race and different religion, but by necessity this will expand to include all illegal immigrants including the undocumented Irish. Maintaining the Homeland Security front he will invest this authority with Stasi-like powers and actively reward citizens to rat on their illegal neighbours. Ridding the countryside of these pesky illegals will initially be costly, but of course the money in the end will be well spent as their previous jobs are vacated and employ genuine citizens instead. Nobody may actually want these low-paid jobs with no security or benefits, but if it gets the local yokels off the street when combined with restrictions on social welfare, well it's a win/win for the government.

Of course, having hundreds if not thousands of Irish Americans deported back to Ireland with their families may not be what our country needs over the next four years, but hey, we can always employ them in Doonbeg building the other Trump wall, right?

FDI

In 2009, the Irish government debt stood at €65b. It currently stands at €184b. At this stage, the debt is currently at a stand still and may end up going into a slight decline over the next few years (let's just ignore the Promissory Note). There are two reasons for this, the first is that our rate of interest on repayments are at an all-time low. The second is that the country is coining it in on taxes, particularly corporation taxes on FDI. As of yet, no-one in the government, opposition benches, economists or Uncle John can explain why these corporate tax revenues are running at such a high level, but we're all going to assume that this will continue to happen, therefore we can easily continue to count on them for our spending plans, right?

This is where our friend Donald pops in. Trump has indicated that he will put an end to inversions, force US companies to repatriate their off-shore cash reserves, put up trade barriers and protect American incomes and finally, ensure that American firms invest in America once again.

So what do you think is going to happen to our precious US FDI in Ireland in 4 years of a Trump presidency? It doesn't take a lot of brainpower to formulate that it will all be bad. There will be no or little new corporate US investment in Ireland. Companies will mothball expansion plans. Existing companies manufacturing bulk pharmaceuticals in Little Island will shut down as trade barriers impact on their margins far more than the positives of a 12.5% tax rate. Companies will be incentivised to bring their jobs and revenues back to the US or face the consequences. You only have to look at what Obama did to he Pfizer/Allergan inversion to see how easy a worm can turn.

The direct result on this will not only be felt in job losses but also tax revenues to the country. It would not take an awful lot of impacts like this to send our 'recovering and booming' economy back to the Dark Ages again. But that's OK right? Because we can always send these tens of thousands of people to build a wall in Doonbeg.

Climate Change

Trump does not believe in Climate Change. He believes in making America great again. If that means ignoring upcoming global catastrophes so be it. Trump as President wants to renege on the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. If the US decides to back out why then would other major polluters like China and India stay in? Within a short period of time, this next to useless agreement will become an irrelevancy. Trump is strongly committed to increase US production regardless of any damage to the climate. US jobs are far more important than saving the world. So have the very real prospect that under a Trump government the effects of climate change will rapidly accelerate to the point of no return.

The prospect then of millions of people being displaced owing to the effects from Climate Change becomes a reality rather than a nightmare. Finding safe destinations for these refugees will become a priority. Luckily in this country we have a low population base, plenty of space and land and a stable climate to welcome, oh, a good 4-5 million if required.

But that's OK. We can send and employ them all to help reinforce the Doonbeg wall. You know that one? The one that Trump needs to build to protect his golf course from the effects of - as he put it himself - rising sea levels and increased storm frequency from the effects of Climate Change.

Rounding this up

I dislike Hillary Clinton in the extreme, her triangulation approach to policies combined with her insider deals with elitist interests in the States, are a continuation of all the things that is so rotten in US politics and its economy for the last 30 years. No-one trusts her.

It is a damning indictment of America where they have a choice between Clinton and Trump as their next President. But bad as it is to have Hillary Clinton as President at least we won't have to endure any of the nightmare scenarios from above that will have or have the potential to do massive damage to this country, let alone the rest of the world.

You don't have to be a left-winger or have any ideologue opinions to understand that a Trump Presidency is a clear and present danger and has to dealt with as the threat it surely is. The people of this country have the right to combat this existential threat and make America and Americans realise what the consequences will be should he succeed.

We have a right to protest in any peaceful and non-violent way that gets that message across. Eilis O'Hanlon represents the lazy, ill-informed and politically motivated nonsense that passes for journalism in this country. Critics of the Sindo and the Indo correctly opine that they are next to a cartoon in relation to more worthy journalistic institutions. But they are missing the point, the vast majority of people in this country read them, and like Donald Trump this can't be ignore and must be faced full-on
 


stopdoingstuff

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Joined
Feb 26, 2011
Messages
22,377
What legislative powers would he have to achieve these things, and why does anyone think a president can do much more than cajole?
 

Barna

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Joined
Aug 25, 2012
Messages
2,988
So, la O'Hanlon has a fluffy nonsense piece in The Sindo about how The Left are ganging up on The Donald for political reasons rather than any concern that Trump will end up being the next Benito Mussolini. As an example, she correctly contrasts Trump's previous history as celebrity business man compared to Clinton's warmongering policies as First Lady, Senator and then Secretary of State. There is a tiny amount at the end that this is all about the Irish left hating America, or I guess American foreign policy, although she doesn't have any empirical evidence and just tacks that last statement on to her meandering, useless arguments. Fair enough. The problem that la O'Hanlon fails to realise, along with certain residents in West Clare, is that Trump is actually the biggest threat this nation faces in the next few months if elected, and the biggest threat for the damage he will do in the four years (at least) after that.

A Trump president would be a critical disaster to this nation on three broad based arguments.

The Undocumented

Trump has made it clear he wants to make America great again, or perhaps, slightly less crap. One of the ways he can achieve this, apart from laughable ideas about walls, is to crack down on illegal immigration. For sure his focus will be on people of a different colour, different race and different religion, but by necessity this will expand to include all illegal immigrants including the undocumented Irish. Maintaining the Homeland Security front he will invest this authority with Stasi-like powers and actively reward citizens to rat on their illegal neighbours. Ridding the countryside of these pesky illegals will initially be costly, but of course the money in the end will be well spent as their previous jobs are vacated and employ genuine citizens instead. Nobody may actually want these low-paid jobs with no security or benefits, but if it gets the local yokels off the street when combined with restrictions on social welfare, well it's a win/win for the government.

Of course, having hundreds if not thousands of Irish Americans deported back to Ireland with their families may not be what our country needs over the next four years, but hey, we can always employ them in Doonbeg building the other Trump wall, right?

FDI

In 2009, the Irish government debt stood at €65b. It currently stands at €184b. At this stage, the debt is currently at a stand still and may end up going into a slight decline over the next few years (let's just ignore the Promissory Note). There are two reasons for this, the first is that our rate of interest on repayments are at an all-time low. The second is that the country is coining it in on taxes, particularly corporation taxes on FDI. As of yet, no-one in the government, opposition benches, economists or Uncle John can explain why these corporate tax revenues are running at such a high level, but we're all going to assume that this will continue to happen, therefore we can easily continue to count on them for our spending plans, right?

This is where our friend Donald pops in. Trump has indicated that he will put an end to inversions, force US companies to repatriate their off-shore cash reserves, put up trade barriers and protect American incomes and finally, ensure that American firms invest in America once again.

So what do you think is going to happen to our precious US FDI in Ireland in 4 years of a Trump presidency? It doesn't take a lot of brainpower to formulate that it will all be bad. There will be no or little new corporate US investment in Ireland. Companies will mothball expansion plans. Existing companies manufacturing bulk pharmaceuticals in Little Island will shut down as trade barriers impact on their margins far more than the positives of a 12.5% tax rate. Companies will be incentivised to bring their jobs and revenues back to the US or face the consequences. You only have to look at what Obama did to he Pfizer/Allergan inversion to see how easy a worm can turn.

The direct result on this will not only be felt in job losses but also tax revenues to the country. It would not take an awful lot of impacts like this to send our 'recovering and booming' economy back to the Dark Ages again. But that's OK right? Because we can always send these tens of thousands of people to build a wall in Doonbeg.

Climate Change

Trump does not believe in Climate Change. He believes in making America great again. If that means ignoring upcoming global catastrophes so be it. Trump as President wants to renege on the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. If the US decides to back out why then would other major polluters like China and India stay in? Within a short period of time, this next to useless agreement will become an irrelevancy. Trump is strongly committed to increase US production regardless of any damage to the climate. US jobs are far more important than saving the world. So have the very real prospect that under a Trump government the effects of climate change will rapidly accelerate to the point of no return.

The prospect then of millions of people being displaced owing to the effects from Climate Change becomes a reality rather than a nightmare. Finding safe destinations for these refugees will become a priority. Luckily in this country we have a low population base, plenty of space and land and a stable climate to welcome, oh, a good 4-5 million if required.

But that's OK. We can send and employ them all to help reinforce the Doonbeg wall. You know that one? The one that Trump needs to build to protect his golf course from the effects of - as he put it himself - rising sea levels and increased storm frequency from the effects of Climate Change.

Rounding this up

I dislike Hillary Clinton in the extreme, her triangulation approach to policies combined with her insider deals with elitist interests in the States, are a continuation of all the things that is so rotten in US politics and its economy for the last 30 years. No-one trusts her.

It is a damning indictment of America where they have a choice between Clinton and Trump as their next President. But bad as it is to have Hillary Clinton as President at least we won't have to endure any of the nightmare scenarios from above that will have or have the potential to do massive damage to this country, let alone the rest of the world.

You don't have to be a left-winger or have any ideologue opinions to understand that a Trump Presidency is a clear and present danger and has to dealt with as the threat it surely is. The people of this country have the right to combat this existential threat and make America and Americans realise what the consequences will be should he succeed.

We have a right to protest in any peaceful and non-violent way that gets that message across. Eilis O'Hanlon represents the lazy, ill-informed and politically motivated nonsense that passes for journalism in this country. Critics of the Sindo and the Indo correctly opine that they are next to a cartoon in relation to more worthy journalistic institutions. But they are missing the point, the vast majority of people in this country read them, and like Donald Trump this can't be ignore and must be faced full-on
It's eilis o'hanlon.
Zoo.
 

Mr Aphorisms

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Messages
5,995
Twitter
crimesofbrits
Hate Amerikkka. It's the right thing to do

[video]https://youtu.be/jKbEaZ-Jnws[/video]

Now paddy is trying to make out he's oppressed because he can't engage in forelock tugging with Trump without the tiny minority of 'leftists' at him. Wholly pathethic from a bunch of grovelling little knackkkers.
 

Kershaw

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Nobody may actually want these low-paid jobs with no security or benefits
Then the employers will need to raise the pay and the conditions for the jobs until someone considers it worth their while. This leads to a functioning, sustainable economy instead of one with lowering standards of living.

So what do you think is going to happen to our precious US FDI in Ireland in 4 years of a Trump presidency? It doesn't take a lot of brainpower to formulate that it will all be bad. There will be no or little new corporate US investment in Ireland.
Not Trump's problem. He isn't being elected president of Ireland. His concern is for Americans and he doesn't like to see their jobs and American industry shipped overseas. Nor does he like to see immigrants being brought in to replace American workers for cheaper pay who are trained-up by the Americans before being fired. I'd very much like if our leaders and the EU were concerned about Irish jobs being shipped over to Eastern Europe and beyond and the effect mass immigration has on jobs here.
 

Mr Aphorisms

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crimesofbrits
Then the employers will need to raise the pay and the conditions for the jobs until someone considers it worth their while. This leads to a functioning, sustainable economy instead of one with lowering standards of living.



Not Trump's problem. He isn't being elected president of Ireland. His concern is for Americans and he doesn't like to see their jobs and American industry shipped overseas. Nor does he like to see immigrants being brought in to replace American workers for cheaper pay who are trained-up by the Americans before being fired. I'd very much like if our leaders and the EU were concerned about Irish jobs being shipped over to Eastern Europe and beyond and the effect mass immigration has on jobs here.
Which is why he shipped jobs over to China to make his ties? No doubt, as a capitalist, he was correct. He wants to make profits. But don't make out he's this egalitarian capitalist

The idea that he will roll back NAFTA and GAAT and go against corporate America is insane. He's already starting to flip flop on social security. Something I actually thought he genuinely believed in.
 

freewillie

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7,295
Which is why he shipped jobs over to China to make his ties? No doubt, as a capitalist, he was correct. He wants to make profits. But don't make out he's this egalitarian capitalist

The idea that he will roll back NAFTA and GAAT and go against corporate America is insane. He's already starting to flip flop on social security. Something I actually thought he genuinely believed in.
You mean he was only saying these things to get elected!!! Was he in contact with Pat Rabbitte by any chance?
 

eoghanacht

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Don does not believe in climate change.

Don has lodged planning permission with Clare county council to build a sea wall to protect his golf links citing, climate change.
 

Mr Aphorisms

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Oh Jesus. His 'that's my African American' over there speech was cringy. Jesus, where would he be without the millions he inherited and daddy's signature early on?

I think a few on here went to his University. No doubt, a PC-free university. Hehehe. How did that work out, without all the 'liberal' professors being replaced by used car salesmen? Hehe. The 'incentives' or 'freedom' or 'efficiency' didn't really work out, did it?

A joke. Hopefully this is the decline of the American empire. It's been cracking for a while. With the libertarians on 10%, the settler state is going to self destruct sooner rather than later.
 

Malbekh

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Messages
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Then the employers will need to raise the pay and the conditions for the jobs until someone considers it worth their while. This leads to a functioning, sustainable economy instead of one with lowering standards of living.



Not Trump's problem. He isn't being elected president of Ireland. His concern is for Americans and he doesn't like to see their jobs and American industry shipped overseas. Nor does he like to see immigrants being brought in to replace American workers for cheaper pay who are trained-up by the Americans before being fired. I'd very much like if our leaders and the EU were concerned about Irish jobs being shipped over to Eastern Europe and beyond and the effect mass immigration has on jobs here.
Point - 1 - agreed, fair enough


Point - 2 - Irish jobs shipped to Eastern Europe? I think the last and main example of that was Dell Computers in 2003
2011 census has 120,000 Poles living and (mostly) working in Ireland. I can tell you from personal experience they are doing jobs that the indigenous population either can't do or don't want to do. They also work hard and diligently. Bit like the Irish undocumented in the US, but with legal status.
 

Kershaw

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Which is why he shipped jobs over to China to make his ties? No doubt, as a capitalist, he was correct. He wants to make profits. But don't make out he's this egalitarian capitalist

The idea that he will roll back NAFTA and GAAT and go against corporate America is insane. He's already starting to flip flop on social security. Something I actually thought he genuinely believed in.
In order to compete like other clothes manufacturers he had to. Trump wants to enact policies which will bring manufacturing back to America.
 

Malbekh

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Don does not believe in climate change.

Don has lodged planning permission with Clare county council to build a sea wall to protect his golf links citing, climate change.
No need to double post thanks as I took care of that in my article that you didn't read
 

Roisin3

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While O'Hanlon's opinions are as useful as the rag she writes for, they're inconsequential to the outcome of the US presidential election.

If Ireland wants and needs US investment so badly, it might be better to consider applying to become the 51st state of that bloc/country rather than remain the what's-the-number-now state of the EU. Spares the undocumented/illegal immigrant Irish too. Let's face it, we probably have more in common with the US than the EU.
 

Adijazz

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Here's a surprise: as president of the United States, Donald Trump will act on the interests of the United States.
 

Kershaw

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Point - 1 - agreed, fair enough


Point - 2 - Irish jobs shipped to Eastern Europe? I think the last and main example of that was Dell Computers in 2003
2011 census has 120,000 Poles living and (mostly) working in Ireland. I can tell you from personal experience they are doing jobs that the indigenous population either can't do or don't want to do. They also work hard and diligently. Bit like the Irish undocumented in the US, but with legal status.
More than just Dell. Read a report about it once. Can't find it now.

I'll just repeat myself, I suppose. If an Irish employer cannot find workers because the Irish workers either can't do or don't want to do the work, then they need to raise the pay and improve the conditions of the job until someone finds it worthwhile to do. This leads to a functioning, sustainable economy with increasing standards of living.

Mass immigration of low-skilled workers negatively affects those at the bottom of he ladder especially, lowering their standard of living. It also affects skilled workers because instead of a company training someone up to do a job, they can just bring in immigrants and pay them less. So an expert IT worker can be shipped in from India or Brazil using the argument that the employer could find no-one with the skills they needed. Years ago employers used to pay for people to go to college to learn the skills they needed.
 


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