• It has come to our attention that some users may have been "banned" when they tried to change their passwords after the site was hacked due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software. This would have occurred around the end of February and does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you believe you were affected by this, please contact a staff member or use the Contact us link at the bottom of any forum page.

Electoral college map with states of equal population


FloatingVoterTralee

Well-known member
Joined
May 8, 2009
Messages
997
Highly unlikely to ever get the political go-ahead, but in this suggested map, the 50 new states each have a population of roughly 6 million, and each state also has the same number of House seats.
 

NYCKY

Moderator
Joined
Apr 17, 2010
Messages
13,101
Interesting concept but like you say "unlikely" to ever get the go ahead certainly in our lifetimes. The issue with the US is that as both a Federal and a Continental country it was never about equal representation. The idea with the bicameral legislature was to give equal weight (as close as state lines allowed) to the voters through the House and equal weight to each of the states through the Senate.

The electoral college is always shifting due to population growth and migration patterns. For instance when California joined the Union in 1850, it has less than 0.5% of the US population but still got two Senators, today it has about 12% (roughly 1/8th) but still has only two Senators or 2% of the Senators. There is much talk about Puerto Rico becoming the next state and if it does it will impact the electoral college in a way that would be now difficult to determine, it would increase by at least two, for the Senators but the rest of the US may lose in the House to keep the number at 435, or the House size could be increased.

If all the states did as Maine and Nebraska do in splitting their electoral votes, Mitt Romney would have beaten Obama by 14 electoral votes despite losing the popular vote by over 3 million votes.

Another system that was recently talked about was awarding one electoral vote per congressional district to the winner and the two Senate votes to the winner of the most congressional districts, which would have given Romney a very comfortable electoral victory, again, despite losing the popular vote by a few million votes. It remains up to the states how to decide apportionment of their electoral votes and thankfully this idea never got any traction.
 

GabhaDubh

Well-known member
Joined
May 20, 2009
Messages
2,243
Another slick attempted to diminish States rights. With Republicans controlling 30 States at present, this acts as a damper for laws to be more middle of the road.
 

Amnesiac

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 27, 2011
Messages
1,035
...won't state populations change over time based on demographics and migration? Are you proposing to redraw states lines every time someone is born or dies or moves? If you're serious with the proposal, go back and analyse US state population changes over time. I imagine you would need to rebalance the system very frequently to maintain an approximately equal population spread across states. And Wyoming will end up bordering the Pacific.
 

FloatingVoterTralee

Well-known member
Joined
May 8, 2009
Messages
997
Obviously I personally didn't draw the map, as my knowledge of American demographic geography would be non-existent, it was just an interesting curio I saw linked on another site, unsure whether the American cartographer has any political inclinations.
 
Top