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Emigration shows East West divide


Keith-M

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Just looking at the 2010, there's a starting difference between emigration rates on the west coast and the east coast. The Dublin rates can be explained by non Irish nationals returning home.

Has the recession just re-emphasised the divisions in this country and the failure of successive government to create sustainable employment opportunities in disadvantaged areas?
 

RahenyFG

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The Dublin rates can be explained by non Irish nationals returning home.
Don't know about that. More non nationals have been coming in post boom. I personally haven't seen a significant drop of them here in Dublin.
 

freewillie

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Just looking at the 2010, there's a starting difference between emigration rates on the west coast and the east coast. The Dublin rates can be explained by non Irish nationals returning home.

Has the recession just re-emphasised the divisions in this country and the failure of successive government to create sustainable employment opportunities in disadvantaged areas?


Maybe Shell could be encouraged to invest in rural coastal areas. Oh wait a minute...
 

Roll_On

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Local Authorities have failed to create nucleated population centres around the large towns, result is a dispersed population with no large economic hubs, which then results in migration. Just look at Northern Ireland, far more effective planning, even in rural areas.
 

Roll_On

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Hardly a great example unless you want an example of another countrys culture been imposed , its a blooooody ugly place with bloooody ugly housing
I was referring to spatial planning, not culture/history or visual attractiveness.
 
D

Dylan2010

Apologies for sounding Dublin centric here but it simply not attractive enough for more people to live in the west. Britain, France, Holland or Germany have multiple centres to choose where people and companies want to move to. In Ireland the only major city is Dublin, drop Galway or Limerick into Europe and they would never be seen again.
 

Roll_On

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so long as we have one off housing, the economy of the regions will continue to decline.
 

freewillie

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so long as we have one off housing, the economy of the regions will continue to decline.
Why in rural France do they have little villages that can maintain a bakery, butcher, grocery shop, a pub or two, post office, petrol station etc What do they do that we dont do?
In some parts of the West now you will need to have a store of petrol at home because the nearest filling station could be twenty miles away
 

Eire1976

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Don't know about that. More non nationals have been coming in post boom. I personally haven't seen a significant drop of them here in Dublin.
They are not there for the boom, only the benefits.

Change it so they can't send money abroad to their bank accounts abroad and then you will see a difference.
 

Burnout

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I have a life.
so long as we have one off housing, the economy of the regions will continue to decline.
Try and elaborate on that point will you, are you saying no one off houses should be allowed or that one off means a certain distance between the house and nearest neighbour. Are you a fool?
 

Keith-M

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Emigration from northern ireland last year was in excess of 25000 , stop peddling your narrow agenda it has little or nothing to do with the issue .
Most people leaving N.I. are going to mainland U/.K., so it's migration rather than emigration. We've seen the same move from rural parts of Ireland to Dublin.
 

MrD011

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Don't know about that. More non nationals have been coming in post boom. I personally haven't seen a significant drop of them here in Dublin.
No your right , if anything there are more of them , I see a massive increase all over Dublin , its unsustainable and is damaging the quality of public services for everybody , its estimated that only one third of schools now are true native irish , the other two thirds are of foreign persuasion. Thats why when I see my local primary school getting an extension built , I'm thinking why ? Just close up our borders and put the money into hospital services or childrens allowance or some other much needed services which have been cut
 

Roll_On

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Why in rural France do they have little villages that can maintain a bakery, butcher, grocery shop, a pub or two, post office, petrol station etc What do they do that we dont do?
In some parts of the West now you will need to have a store of petrol at home because the nearest filling station could be twenty miles away
Because France has 60 million people, and they enjoy town living, it'd be difficult in France to flog a rural property that was out of walking/cycling distance from the town centre. They also have proper planning, and an excessively centralised state.
 

Roll_On

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Emigration from northern ireland last year was in excess of 25000 , stop peddling your narrow agenda it has little or nothing to do with the issue .
Eh, I never disputed the fact that people migrate from northern Ireland. I was commenting on the map posted in the OP which clearly shows most of Northern Ireland has positive net migration. I was merely using Northern Ireland as an example, you could equally take Britain or Norway as another example.

What do you mean agenda? I hypothesised, based on the info available and my educational background that the reason for the supposed migration gap between the east and the west was down to poor planning.

For some reason you've chosen to take an aggressive tone with me the second I mentioned Northern Ireland. Seems it is you who has the agenda.
 

Roll_On

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Try and elaborate on that point will you, are you saying no one off houses should be allowed or that one off means a certain distance between the house and nearest neighbour. Are you a fool?
I elaborated in a previous post. I'm quite shocked by the hand baging on this thread. Essentially my point is, Ireland has a dispersed population, particularly west of the Shannon, this caused by bad planning/corruption in the planning process.

The result is Cities like Cork Galway and Limerick have shrinking/stagnant population growth while the populations of rural hinterlands boom. As a result of this bizzar population trend, towns and cities in Ireland do not grow significantly. Without larger cities, which can attract more business than smatterings of houses across the countryside, the economy of the west will continue to deteriorate. It's about economies of scale.
 

Analyzer

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Let's be honest here - emigration hits where opportunities are least available.

And that usually means working class areas and the west of the country.

If only these people united to fight the cronyism, cliqueism and rampant extortion of the establishment.
 

james5001

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T'was always thus.
Yep, look at a map of emigration during the Famine in Ireland. Pretty similar.
Shows how big an impact the Famine really had on us. I was reading how so many people in rural Ireland were employed in manufacturing before the Famine. It never really improved once the Famine destroyed a lot of it.
 
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