England's coming revolution in university funding-profs and students quaking!

Chrisco

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2008
Messages
3,822
Privatisation of universities is necessary to exorcise the Left-Liberal bias in Third Level academia. They should not be colleges of Communism. :roll: Remember Paris 1968.
Left-liberal bias in academia is not a consequence of state-funding, it is a function of intelligence. ;)
 


FutureTaoiseach

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 20, 2005
Messages
7,980
Website
greatdearleader.blogspot.com
Because, as we all know, private universities in the United States are bastions of conservatism.
No but neither are they as Hard Left as their European counterparts (Ward Churchill and Bill Ayers notwithstanding).
Chrisco said:
Left-liberal bias in academia is not a consequence of state-funding
It's part of it. If you're livelihood comes from Big Government, you are inclined to pander to Big Government as an ideology
it is a function of intelligence. ;)
Soviet-intelligence? ;)
 
D

Dylan2010

one thing is for sure, the education bubble is about to pop. I for one wouldnt be too sorry to see a hachet taken to the "fluffier" end of the third level sector. We need fees to focus the mind of all concerned. Scholarships and grants should only be for core studies.
 

Clanrickard

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 25, 2008
Messages
33,214
You've obviously never set foot in a dining hall or common room in your life. I guess all those Oxbridge students were simply pi$$ing away their talent having deep and meaningful exchanges with one another...

I suppose you'd prefer cheap shots in the UL student bar... Great craic altogether. AA when you hit 30 and the reality of the world smacks you in the face. Can't stand the sight of your friends owning cars and houses.
I own a house and a car so in answer, no it is not about envy. Also yes I have been in a common room as I have undergraduate and post graduate qualifications. Also I fail to see what AA has to do with it. Your bitterness in this thread leads me to believe this whole concept of introducing a bit of good old fashioned competition has rattled your cage. Are you a university lecturer? If so you are the fattest of fat cats. Roll on some real reforms for real education and the chopping down to size of the ivory towers.
 

Cabbage/Turnip

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 23, 2010
Messages
1,409
People who spew crap such as "bloody arts students" are ignorant buffoons who don't know the difference between a qualification and an education. Usually it's because they don't understand the collegiate nature of university life as they've never experienced it themselves and are slightly bitter. Read Cardinal Newman's "Idea of a University".

Oxford and Cambridge won't be affected by this one bit. Trinity College, Cambridge for example has a trust fund of about £1bn. They don't spend money on anything unless they have a trust to back it up. E.g. a professor's salary of £100k per annum needs a trust of ~£5m - the 100k can be taken out each year and the trust still maintains itself against inflation. Of course the smart thing to do is to have a £6m trust that grows over time. Which is what Oxbridge do.

Education for the masses has failed. Why should taxpayers pay for it? The meaning of the word "university" has utterly changed. For the worse IMO.

Here in Ireland, the last bastions of proper university life include Trinity College, the Royal University (now UCD - I use Royal "University" because that was a proper university given the fullest sense of the word, UCC and Maynooth (which both still maintain remnants of the collegiate nature of proper universities).

UL, DCU,
and all the ITs dotted evenly around the country are full of deluded people who live in the future and 3rd rate "lecturers" who haven't written a quality research paper in years and some, who have never written a paper in their lives. The pensions and tea breaks are great though.

Bill Gates has some very interesting stuff to say on universities in the modern world. In particular, the growth of e-learning and continual professional development facilitated by the internet. Organisations like the Open University are thriving and I have a lot of time for the work that they do.

Anyway, the Labour policy of the 1990s has failed. Nobody will be willing to pay €5k to €10k a year for a 3rd rate education in a local IT which will result in their inevitable decline and that, for everyone, will be a good thing.

Nothing like a good apprenticeship in an expanding organisation when you're 18. I've seen people joining the bank at 18 ending up on the trading room floor on full salary + commission at 22, alongside B€$$ and BComm entitlement graduates working for €20k on "graduate programs".

Alot of very important lecturers in UL also a very important college looking at high tech materials (MSSI building) alot of nurses and alot of teachers also come from UL, and UL has a far tougher grading and passing system than other other colleges UCC for example... DCU has the best journalism course in the country with many of the writers people on here rip there ideas from lecturing there.
 

Odyessus

Well-known member
Joined
May 16, 2007
Messages
12,890
Alot of very important lecturers in UL also a very important college looking at high tech materials (MSSI building) alot of nurses and alot of teachers also come from UL, and UL has a far tougher grading and passing system than other other colleges UCC for example... DCU has the best journalism course in the country with many of the writers people on here rip there ideas from lecturing there.
May I advise you to re-read what you've written before posting it?

The above is gibberish.
 

Cabbage/Turnip

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 23, 2010
Messages
1,409
May I advise you to re-read what you've written before posting it?

The above is gibberish.
other than poor english (because i dont have the time to be checking everything) whats wrong with it.... UCC students can fail all there exams during a year an repeat them in the august, in UL if you fail more than two in any semester you fail university. Colum Kenny is a senior lecturer in DCU and he writes for the sunday indo which is a favourite for most of the apes on this site. i dont understand gibberish when i speak the truth
 

Chrisco

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2008
Messages
3,822
UCC students can fail all there exams during a year an repeat them in the august, in UL if you fail more than two in any semester you fail university.
And what does that prove?
 

Cabbage/Turnip

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 23, 2010
Messages
1,409
And what does that prove?
it proves that students of UL have to put the work in all year round with only a small level of give on how much you can repeat, while in UCC you can pull the piss all year fail everything and repeat in august with no limit on how much you can fail. basically UL sets a higher standard from its students and accepts less nonsense
 

Squire Allworthy

Well-known member
Joined
May 31, 2007
Messages
1,404
Classroom learning aside,the development of social skills through the opportunities for socialising in college life has an important influence on careers. Selection of applicants in most job interviews for professional work is influenced by social skills,especially the perceived ability to fit in with the working group. Of course,this is an advantage for the individual,not for the economy as a whole; if the level of social skills fell,it wouldn't change economic output.

Another advantage of socialising in college is the opportunity to have intellectual conversation with friends and acquaintances. Some clever people I've met claim they learned more in pub debates with friends than in university.

There is no question that the social skills acquired at school and university are invaluable as are the networks that you develop.

It is amazing how many go through University and never get involved in the social aspects. They don't join the Union, don't go to, or participate in, the debates, the dances etc. They don't join the chapel choir, or the college orchestra and they don't organise social events, sports outings, charitable fund raisers or whatever, and they certainly don't edit one of the newspapers.

Many just live at home and go to the local University. It is almost an extension of school for them. They miss one of the main points of going to University. They are given a unique opportunity to widen their interests and try virtually anything from joining the blue stockings to experimental theatre and wind surfing.

There are probably many reasons for this. Economic, personality types, a desire to not waste time and do well academically, but I think that much of the blame rests with the school they attended prior to University. The process of widening interests and building self confidence needs to start much earlier.
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top