English words surviving in Celtic languages - but not in English

Cai

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I live in a town that's now overwhelmingly Welsh speaking, but was at one time reserved solely for English settlers. We refer to other people from the town as 'cofi'. The term apparently comes from the Middle English word 'covey' - which meant 'friend'.

There's a mountain not that far away called 'Cnicht' - with the ch sounded hard as in 'loch' & the c at the start sounded. It comes the English word 'Knight ' - again the 'gh ' would sound pretty much like the Welsh. 'ch' in Middle English & the c at the beginning pronounced.

Locally we say 'sbio ' instead of the more usual 'edrych ' for 'look'. Sbio is a Welshified version of 'spy' which until a couple of centuries ago meant 'look '.

It seems odd that English forms have survived in the particular dialect of Welsh that I use, when they haven't survived in their original language.

Are there any examples in Irish dialects?
 
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Toland

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I live in a town that's now overwhelmingly Welsh speaking, but was at one time reserved solely for English settlers. We refer to other people from the town as 'cofi'. The term apparently comes from the Middle English word 'covey' - which meant 'friend'.

There's a mountain not that far away called 'Cnicht' - with the ch sounded hard as in 'loch'. It comes the English word 'Knight ' - again the 'gh ' would sound pretty much like the Welsh. 'ch' in Middle English.

Locally we say 'sbio ' instead of the more usual 'edrych ' for 'look'. Sbio is a Welshified version of 'spy' which until a couple of centuries ago meant 'look '.

It seems odd that English forms have survived in the particular dialect of Welsh that I use, when they haven't survived in their original language.

Are there any examples in Irish dialects?
A pretty OP. Thank you. I can't help I'm afraid.
 

Filibuster

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Craic was actually an old word for lots of noise and chatter.
Disappeared from English but survived in Irish and got reintroduced to Britain again.
 

GDPR

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Irish people often use "wit" to mean sense, rather than the modern English meaning of humour. There are a lot of examples like this. I'm pretty sure there are a good few English borrowing in Irish that have kept their meaning while the English has changed, but I'll have to think about that any get back to you.
 
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I live in a town that's now overwhelmingly Welsh speaking, but was at one time reserved solely for English settlers. We refer to other people from the town as 'cofi'. The term apparently comes from the Middle English word 'covey' - which meant 'friend'.

There's a mountain not that far away called 'Cnicht' - with the ch sounded hard as in 'loch'. It comes the English word 'Knight ' - again the 'gh ' would sound pretty much like the Welsh. 'ch' in Middle English.

Locally we say 'sbio ' instead of the more usual 'edrych ' for 'look'. Sbio is a Welshified version of 'spy' which until a couple of centuries ago meant 'look '.

It seems odd that English forms have survived in the particular dialect of Welsh that I use, when they haven't survived in their original language.

Are there any examples in Irish dialects?
One example which comes to mind is cófra, which is Anglo-Norman. We still have the word coffret in French, but I am not sure whether it is used in English.
 

Filibuster

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That's in Hiberno-English though, not Irish.
Plenty of older words will hang on in regional versions of any language. Yorkshire even holds onto thee, thou and thine.
 

Filibuster

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Keeping money in the coffers probably has same original stem as cófra.

Coffrett etc
 
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Keeping money in the coffers probably has same original stem as cófra.

Coffrett etc
Absolutely. I was struggling to find an equivalent use in English and that would gel perfectly.
 

GrainneDee

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I live in a town that's now overwhelmingly Welsh speaking, but was at one time reserved solely for English settlers. We refer to other people from the town as 'cofi'. The term apparently comes from the Middle English word 'covey' - which meant 'friend'.

There's a mountain not that far away called 'Cnicht' - with the ch sounded hard as in 'loch' & the c at the start sounded. It comes the English word 'Knight ' - again the 'gh ' would sound pretty much like the Welsh. 'ch' in Middle English & the c at the beginning pronounced.

Locally we say 'sbio ' instead of the more usual 'edrych ' for 'look'. Sbio is a Welshified version of 'spy' which until a couple of centuries ago meant 'look '.

It seems odd that English forms have survived in the particular dialect of Welsh that I use, when they haven't survived in their original language.

Are there any examples in Irish dialects?
Very interesting question, it's one I'd have to think about.

My first thoughts would be words that would have been introduced to Irish fairly late, of which Irish took up the then pronunciation. The word for "tea" springs to mine. In Elizabethan English, it was "tay", and the Irish word is still pronounced that way. Written "tae". While the English pronunciation has changed to "tee". It's the same in Hiberno English, where "sea" is often pronounced "say"

"The French are on the sea,
they'll be here without delay,
and the Orange will decay
said the Sean Bhean Bhocht"

The dialect words you mention in Wales have probably survived because they are in a small area where change, linguistically speaking, is slow
 

Filibuster

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Actually you have to use thou and thine etc if you want google translate to use "tu" instead of vous etc
 

Dame_Enda

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The word "craic" despite its Irish connotations actually comes from Middle English. It came over with the settlers, fell out of use in Britain, and recently reentered English through Irish immigration.
 

Cellachán Chaisil

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I live in a town that's now overwhelmingly Welsh speaking, but was at one time reserved solely for English settlers. We refer to other people from the town as 'cofi'. The term apparently comes from the Middle English word 'covey' - which meant 'friend'.

There's a mountain not that far away called 'Cnicht' - with the ch sounded hard as in 'loch' & the c at the start sounded. It comes the English word 'Knight ' - again the 'gh ' would sound pretty much like the Welsh. 'ch' in Middle English & the c at the beginning pronounced.

Locally we say 'sbio ' instead of the more usual 'edrych ' for 'look'. Sbio is a Welshified version of 'spy' which until a couple of centuries ago meant 'look '.

It seems odd that English forms have survived in the particular dialect of Welsh that I use, when they haven't survived in their original language.

Are there any examples in Irish dialects?
Yes.

Often, it's meanings of words that no longer survive in English. The Irish splanc "spark" comes from the English "blink" which once held that meaning. Cniocht as a disparaging term for English used be used in many Irish dialects and also comes from knight. Spórt and spraoi come from "sport" and "spree" but preserve the meaning "fun" which has for the most part been lost. The word stríoc comes from "strike" but also carries the meaning "to yield or to lose". The Irish naprún "apron" also preserves the fact the word in English was once spelled "napron". The word leábharaic also comes from the Scots word "laverick" meaning "a lark" but can also be in perjorative circumstances.

It's also of note that some words change meaning completely. For instance "blancmange" survives in Irish as plámás which means to unduly flatter someone.
 

GrainneDee

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That's in Hiberno-English though, not Irish.
Plenty of older words will hang on in regional versions of any language. Yorkshire even holds onto thee, thou and thine.
Do you mean "craic"? It's in Hiberno English and in Irish. "Ceol, caint agus craic"; although I suspect it migrated from Hiberno English to Irish in recent years.
 

Filibuster

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The Cork City Centre accent has fairly recent French influences from the Huganots who were very visble and interactive traders in the city back in the day - the cadence/rhythm, the rising at the end of words, asking questions by looking at you funny and going up at the end of sentences and adding "hien??"

Saying com-it-TEEEE instead of comITtee (très à la française)
 

Cellachán Chaisil

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One example which comes to mind is cófra, which is Anglo-Norman. We still have the word coffret in French, but I am not sure whether it is used in English.
May also have evolved under the influence of the Irish comhra, though that word survives too as "cónra".

As for English, "when the coin in the coffer sings, then the soul to heaven springs".
 


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