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Eoghan Murphy watch - track his housing policies and delivery of ACTUAL HOMES


Golden Phoenix

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Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
935
Given that the housing crisis is the single biggest issue currently facing the country let's keep a detailed record and analysis of Eoghan Murphy's performance and DELIVERY OF ACTUAL HOMES.
 
Last edited:


Levellers

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Joined
Apr 30, 2011
Messages
14,093
Good luck with that.

The only positive I have ever seen with Murphy is that his grandfather robbed Gay Byrne!
 

PBP voter

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Sep 18, 2015
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9,041
We don't need new houses. We just need to use the 180,000 empty homes-20,000 in Dublin.

:)

We don't wan't tradesmen get big pay and laughing at us all like the last time.
 

GDPR

1
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Jul 5, 2008
Messages
222,963
What housing crisis? Values are going up nicely and must not be interrupted.

Sent from my SM-A320FL using Tapatalk
 

Golden Phoenix

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May 21, 2015
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935
Varadkar has tasked Murphy with a review of housing policy - to be completed within 3 months.

Which speaks volumes about Coveney's housing policies. :(
 

Disillusioned democrat

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Mar 16, 2010
Messages
15,736
Good thread - Eoghan's pedigree screams "establishment", so not 100% sure he understands the purpose of the Ministry for Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government.

He, like Coveney before him, may well believe that his responsibility is to plan to make the community enrich his peer group by getting local government to pay for housing for everyone thru RA, HAP and giving developers free land.
 

Disillusioned democrat

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Mar 16, 2010
Messages
15,736
Varadkar has tasked Murphy with a review of housing policy - to be completed within 3 months.

Which speaks volumes about Coveney's housing policies. :(
Or Varadkar's real agenda...this will be very telling. Varadkar probably doesn't subscribe to the notion that "nice neighbourhoods" should house povs.
 

mr_anderson

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Joined
Dec 12, 2007
Messages
9,940
1)We shouldn't be looking for the government to ''deliver homes''.
We should be focused on why the cost of building is so high in the private sector.

If we get the cost down, people can buy without having a noose around their necks for 25-30 years.

How much do government taxes & levies increase the cost of a home ?


2) Build high-rise i.e. Planning.
We should be able to build up to 30 stories in the city.
Workers want to live within walking or cycling distance of their daily job.
You can't attract thousands of jobs into the city & then turn around and prevent workers from living there (by restricting supply).
Not only does it make their lives unnecessarily stressful, but it increases the pressure on rush-hour traffic.


3) No unemployed person should be given a place to live in the city centre.
Not only is it extremely expensive, but it forces a worker to live in the suburbs & commute daily.
Morally, it's just wrong.


The key with all of this is supply.
Increase supply in aggregate.
Increase supply particularly where it's needed (city centres).
Get rents down (by increasing supply) so tenants have enough money left to spend in the wider economy, thereby boosting more than one sector.

As it stands, current government policy is purposely pushing prices up.
 
Last edited:

Disillusioned democrat

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 16, 2010
Messages
15,736
1)We shouldn't be looking for the government to ''deliver homes''.
We should be focused on why the cost of building is so high in the private sector.

If we get the cost down, people can buy without having a noose around their necks for 25-30 years.


2) Build high-rise i.e. Planning.
We should be able to build up to 30 stories in the city.
Workers want to live within walking or cycling distance of their daily job.
You can't attract thousands of jobs into the city & then turn around and prevent workers from living there (by restricting supply).
Not only does it make their lives unnecessarily stressful, but it increases the pressure on rush-hour traffic.


3) No unemployed person should be given a place to live in the city centre.
Not only is it extremely expensive, but it forces a worker to live in the suburbs & commute daily.
Morally, it's just wrong.


The key with all of this is supply.
Increase supply in aggregate.
Increase supply particularly where it's needed (city centres).
Get rents down (by increasing supply) so tenants have enough money left to spend in the wider economy, thereby boosting more than one sector.

As it stands, current government policy is purposely pushing prices up.
I'm tending to disagree now - I think the state SHOULD build 10 - 20k affordable homes across the country and start to manage homelessness at a national level, taking the local noise out of it and taking the pressure off the private market.

No home, no job - no problem, a temporary state home in one of the centres awaits anyone who obeys a few simple rules. Can't even do that - you're on your own buddy.

There's way too much emotion in "housing" now, too much at stake for chancers like the lady with 5 kids in the car or Erika Flemming.
 

Civic_critic2

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 29, 2008
Messages
4,904
1)We shouldn't be looking for the government to ''deliver homes''.
We should be focused on why the cost of building is so high in the private sector.

If we get the cost down, people can buy without having a noose around their necks for 25-30 years.

How much do government taxes & levies increase the cost of a home ?


2) Build high-rise i.e. Planning.
We should be able to build up to 30 stories in the city.
Workers want to live within walking or cycling distance of their daily job.
You can't attract thousands of jobs into the city & then turn around and prevent workers from living there (by restricting supply).
Not only does it make their lives unnecessarily stressful, but it increases the pressure on rush-hour traffic.


3) No unemployed person should be given a place to live in the city centre.
Not only is it extremely expensive, but it forces a worker to live in the suburbs & commute daily.
Morally, it's just wrong.


The key with all of this is supply.
Increase supply in aggregate.
Increase supply particularly where it's needed (city centres).
Get rents down (by increasing supply) so tenants have enough money left to spend in the wider economy, thereby boosting more than one sector.

As it stands, current government policy is purposely pushing prices up.
1) remove estate agents from the process, they put an extra 3% cost unnecessarily on everything. Introduce IT automation and information clearing houses run by cooperatives.
2) remove banks from the process, they add an unnecessary 30% to the process and levy further extraction over a 25-30 year period through interest.
3) remove government levies from the process, they add another 30% to the cost.
4) introduce vastly improved construction techniques, including automation and off-site construction, cutting construction costs in half.
5) remove farmers from the process and make it law that all newly zoned land costs agricultural price + 25% just as elsewhere.
6) lock Tom Parlon in the snug of Doheny and Nesbitts and throw away the key
7) assemble co-operatives that will sell at cost.
8) televise the whinging faces of the Irish establishment as they pointlessly rub two brain cells together trying to think of how else to make money.
 

Dame_Enda

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Joined
Dec 14, 2011
Messages
52,222
Post Grenfell tower I am less sure about high rise than I was. But the problem there was the cladding and a blocked escape stairs. Unfortunately I see a lot of similar looking cladding in my town. I want Eoghan to remove fire hazardous cladding from buildings and make sprinkler systems compulsory.
 

realistic1

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 27, 2008
Messages
11,402
We socialists do; you Fine Gaelers might not.
I know plenty of people who are not "socialists" who have no issues paying tradesmen a decent wage. In my experience it has been the "socialists" who use immigrant workers to bring down wages and conditions for Native tradesmen.
 

Disillusioned democrat

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Joined
Mar 16, 2010
Messages
15,736
I know plenty of people who are not "socialists" who have no issues paying tradesmen a decent wage. In my experience it has been the "socialists" who use immigrant workers to bring down wages and conditions for Native tradesmen.
A qualified tradesman deserves all he/she can get.

A spoofer like Tom Parlon getting paid 6 figures for selling "access to influence" to make homes 20 - 30% more expensive than they need to be is the problem. I'd say Eoghan Murphy has more in common with Tom Parlon than Bob the Builder.
 

Golden Phoenix

Well-known member
Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
935
1) remove estate agents from the process, they put an extra 3% cost unnecessarily on everything. Introduce IT automation and information clearing houses run by cooperatives.
2) remove banks from the process, they add an unnecessary 30% to the process and levy further extraction over a 25-30 year period through interest.
3) remove government levies from the process, they add another 30% to the cost.
4) introduce vastly improved construction techniques, including automation and off-site construction, cutting construction costs in half.
5) remove farmers from the process and make it law that all newly zoned land costs agricultural price + 25% just as elsewhere.
6) lock Tom Parlon in the snug of Doheny and Nesbitts and throw away the key
7) assemble co-operatives that will sell at cost.
8) televise the whinging faces of the Irish establishment as they pointlessly rub two brain cells together trying to think of how else to make money.
Great merit to the above and 6) is hilarious also!
 

Spanner Island

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2011
Messages
24,199
1)We shouldn't be looking for the government to ''deliver homes''.
We should be focused on why the cost of building is so high in the private sector.

If we get the cost down, people can buy without having a noose around their necks for 25-30 years.

How much do government taxes & levies increase the cost of a home ?
It may well be too late at this stage... after decades of being indoctrinated with rocketing prices and the sad development of people buying a roof over their head with a perpetual eye on how much filthy lucre it'll make for them in value as they reside there.

The Irish have a dysfunctional relationship with property.

Even if all of the taxes the 'state' has its filthy mits on during the build and sale of property were abolished people would still be addicted to the easy money vibe and always expect values to go up...

2) Build high-rise i.e. Planning.
We should be able to build up to 30 stories in the city.
Workers want to live within walking or cycling distance of their daily job.
You can't attract thousands of jobs into the city & then turn around and prevent workers from living there (by restricting supply).
Not only does it make their lives unnecessarily stressful, but it increases the pressure on rush-hour traffic.
Yep... current restrictions are ludicrous although I would always prefer high rise to be clustered in designated areas as opposed to one offs dotted around the place...
 

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