Erse & Goidelic languages

Socratus O' Pericles

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The wikipeadia page about Goidelic languages contains this:


Scotland takes its name from the Latin word for 'Gael', Scotus, plural Scoti (of uncertain etymology).[15] Scotland originally meant Land of the Gaels in a cultural and social sense. Until late in the 15th century, Scottis in Scottish English (or Scots Inglis) was used to refer only to Gaelic, and the speakers of this language who were identified as Scots. As the ruling elite became Scots Inglis/English-speaking, Scottis was gradually associated with the land rather than the people, and the word Erse ('Irish') was gradually used more and more as an act of culturo-political disassociation with an overt implication that the language was not really Scottish, and therefore foreign. This was something of a propaganda label, as Gaelic has been in Scotland for at least as long as English, if not longer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goidelic_languages


Would anyone know more about Erse and the links with any Goidelic language?

The wikipedia entry on Erse is brief.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erse
 


eoghanacht

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It's a cousin of Ulster Irish, the Dal Riada tribe of the Ulaid started colonising western Scotland and it's Isle. Some where around the seventh century iirc, right up until the fifteenth century when the McDonald Lord of the Isle power was broken.
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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It's a cousin of Ulster Irish, the Dal Riada tribe of the Ulaid started colonising western Scotland and it's Isle. Some where around the seventh century iirc, right up until the fifteenth century when the McDonald Lord of the Isle power was broken.
So was it spoken Ulster and Scotland? Would there be any texts
 

eoghanacht

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So was it spoken Ulster and Scotland? Would there be any texts
I'm sure there are, the monks of Iona who would of been transcribing bibilical passages would have been Gaelic speakers.

It was the lingua franca of the early middle age Scotland, it became known as Erse for political reasons as you have said above.

During a time when Scots were forging a national identity, the highland Gaelic Catholic past versus the lowlands Protestant future.

It's come down to us today as the Old Firm Derby.

Where both sides gather and replay the battle of colluden.
 

eoghanacht

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All the Scottish Gaelic dialects, and Manx for that matter, are basically dialects of Irish.
They may have originated as early middle age Irish but like all the languages of these islands heavily influenced by waves of invaders, Viking, Anglo Saxon and then Norman.
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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I heard this song was in Erse:

[video=youtube;t9n0zz3i5Ks]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t9n0zz3i5Ks[/video]
 

McTell

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No
Scots gaelic is what Mammy Trump spoke when she went home.

Maybe taught Donal Mor a word or two.

Donald Trump's mother: From a Scottish island to New York's elite - BBC News


...Mr MacIver says Mary Anne MacLeod was well-known and much respected in the community and used to attend the church on her visits home.Mr Trump's mother became a US citizen in 1942 and died in 2000, aged 88.
But she returned to Lewis throughout her life and always spoke Gaelic, Mr MacIver says.
 

eoghanacht

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Apologies just re reading my last post where I mistakenly suggest that Erse only came into use during the clashes in the seventeenth century it was in use much earlier than that.

I see someone posted a tune sung in Scots Gaelic, another one we would all be familiar with would be fionnghuala.
 

Hunter-Gatherer

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It's a cousin of Ulster Irish, the Dal Riada tribe of the Ulaid started colonising western Scotland and it's Isle. Some where around the seventh century iirc, right up until the fifteenth century when the McDonald Lord of the Isle power was broken.
if you're gonna nick some land, at least choose a place with a nice climate ? Finisterre ( either the french or the spanish one) would have made much more sense.
 

GJG

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Howyeh ducks,

Is Shelta a Goidelic language?
Wiki says it is mixed Celtic and Germanic. I think that it can be best described as a creole, but that there is a reluctance to describe it as such because of the low perceived status of a creole; since I don't share that opinion, I don't think there is anything wrong with acknowledging it as such.

The Celtic part is certainly Goidelic.
 


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