Ethno-Nationalist Terrorism and The Never Ending Narrative.



McSlaggart

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You have no evidence for your assertion, just the theory of an academic from a third tier university.
Barry Raftery (16 August 1944 - 22 August 2010) was an Irish archaeologist and Celtic scholar known for his work on the Iron Age in Ireland.[1] He was recognised as Ireland's leading scholar on the archaeology of later prehistoric societies and was appointed to the chair of Celtic archaeology at University College Dublin in 1996.[2] Raftery had a long an internationally distinguished career and had a major impact on archaeology at both an Irish and a European level.

wikipedia
 

Mickeymac

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Barry Raftery (16 August 1944 - 22 August 2010) was an Irish archaeologist and Celtic scholar known for his work on the Iron Age in Ireland.[1] He was recognised as Ireland's leading scholar on the archaeology of later prehistoric societies and was appointed to the chair of Celtic archaeology at University College Dublin in 1996.[2] Raftery had a long an internationally distinguished career and had a major impact on archaeology at both an Irish and a European level.

wikipedia

Looks like DT has been game, set and matched yet again.
๐Ÿ˜‚
 

Newrybhoy

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Looks like DT has been game, set and matched yet again.
๐Ÿ˜‚
Barry Raftery (16 August 1944 - 22 August 2010) was an Irish archaeologist and Celtic scholar known for his work on the Iron Age in Ireland.[1] He was recognised as Ireland's leading scholar on the archaeology of later prehistoric societies and was appointed to the chair of Celtic archaeology at University College Dublin in 1996.[2] Raftery had a long an internationally distinguished career and had a major impact on archaeology at both an Irish and a European level.

wikipedia
Strange that your other link said that there was virtually no Celtic relics to be found. So he must have had a quiet time being a Celtic Archaeologist.
 

Glaucon

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Note: You need to support your assertion with evidence.
He's correct here (if he is speaking in reference to the Norman invasion). The Norman invasion of Ireland was led by the conquerors of the Anglo-Saxons, and was a motley crew of English and French-born Normans, impressed Anglo-Saxons, Welshmen, Flemings and so forth. The Normans, at the time, spoke French among themselves and ruled over an Anglo-Saxon-speaking peasant population. The centre of the Norman Empire was not in England at the time either. It was in France. It could not be considered an independent "English" invasion with any sense of accuracy, and was rolled back in any event by the native Irish over the next few centuries.

Later invasions, such as the Nine Years' War, were "English" in the modern sense as the Normans had by then given up French, lost their territories in France to the King of France and merged with the existing Anglo-Saxon population.
 

Newrybhoy

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He's correct here (if he is speaking in reference to the Norman invasion). The Norman invasion of Ireland was led by the conquerors of the Anglo-Saxons, and was a motley crew of English and French-born Normans, impressed Anglo-Saxons, Welshmen, Flemings and so forth. The Normans, at the time, spoke French among themselves and ruled over an Anglo-Saxon-speaking peasant population. The centre of the Norman Empire was not in England at the time either. It was in France. It could not be considered an independent "English" invasion with any sense of accuracy, and was rolled back in any event by the native Irish over the next few centuries.

Later invasions, such as the Nine Years' War, were "English" in the modern sense as the Normans had by then given up French, lost their territories in France to the King of France and merged with the existing Anglo-Saxon population.
Surely the Normans were invited over by Strongbow.

No invasion.
 

Glaucon

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Strongbow was a Norman. Whether he invited other Normans over or not is irrelevant. It was an invasion, just as the Norman conquest of England was an invasion. But it was not an "English" invasion if by English one means the modern English state. The Normans were French and conquered territories in England and Wales which were appendages to their principal territories in France. No King of England after 1066 could speak any English whatever before Edward I (over 200 years later), and it would be the 14th century before English became the language of Parliament.
 
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Ozyedia

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I'm sure it did but it is no more Native than Anglo Saxon.
You and I have been over this many times.
Gaelic culture is native to Ireland.
Anglo-Saxon culture is not.
According to your logic, no culture is native to anywhere since ALL humans have migrated. This is at odds with literally every authority on the matter.
You are simply wrong, yet continue to propogate the lie. Why?
 

Newrybhoy

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You and I have been over this many times.
Gaelic culture is native to Ireland.
Anglo-Saxon culture is not.
According to your logic, no culture is native to anywhere since ALL humans have migrated. This is at odds with literally every authority on the matter.
You are simply wrong, yet continue to propogate the lie. Why?
Release date came through then.
 


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