EU Calls For Right to be Forgotten on Social Networking Sites

Tea Party Patriot

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Personally given the recent statement by the head of Google, that students would be looking to change their names by deed poll in a few years time because, of the repercussions of posting personal information to social networking sites I think this proposed legislation is a good thing.

While I am an advocate of free speech I am also an advocate of the right to protect personal information. Legislation in this area is badly needed and would be indeed welcomed.

EU calls for 'right to be forgotten' on internet - Europe, World News - Independent.ie
 


YoungLiberal

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You'd have to wonder what people are putting up, and how other people can see it. My facebook page has hundreds of pictures of me absolutely bananas, but no one can see them except for my friends (okay, with 500 odd, chances are there are people there that I'm not exactly bessie mates with) and even if they could, what'd be the big revelation.

Notwithstanding that, I do support the EU's stance.
 

Asparagus

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You'd have to wonder what people are putting up, and how other people can see it. My facebook page has hundreds of pictures of me absolutely bananas, but no one can see them except for my friends (okay, with 500 odd, chances are there are people there that I'm not exactly bessie mates with) and even if they could, what'd be the big revelation.

Notwithstanding that, I do support the EU's stance.
Because when you are MiddleagedConservative you will not want your kids googling you and finding pictures of you baloobas, or reading how you sh@gged this one, or wouldn't touch that one with some one else bargepole.
Or how you voted for FF.
Or how you broke up with their mother and then got back together.

The young social networkers have no concept / appreciatuion of the need for privacy....
 

Clanrickard

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Because when you are MiddleagedConservative you will not want your kids googling you and finding pictures of you baloobas, or reading how you sh@gged this one, or wouldn't touch that one with some one else bargepole.
Or how you voted for FF.
Or how you broke up with their mother and then got back together.

The young social networkers have no concept / appreciatuion of the need for privacy....
The underlined bit would be the most embarrassing. Frankly if you are stupid enough to put it online it is your own tough %%%%
 

Tea Party Patriot

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You'd have to wonder what people are putting up, and how other people can see it. My facebook page has hundreds of pictures of me absolutely bananas, but no one can see them except for my friends (okay, with 500 odd, chances are there are people there that I'm not exactly bessie mates with) and even if they could, what'd be the big revelation.

Notwithstanding that, I do support the EU's stance.
When you add an application like Mob Wars, Mafia Wars, or any of the other multiple ones doing the rounds on facebook you give the company behind the application access to your friends list, photos, likes, and personal information. How aware of this users are is something I often question.
 

YoungLiberal

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Because when you are MiddleagedConservative you will not want your kids googling you and finding pictures of you baloobas, or reading how you sh@gged this one, or wouldn't touch that one with some one else bargepole.
Or how you voted for FF.
Or how you broke up with their mother and then got back together.

The young social networkers have no concept / appreciatuion of the need for privacy....
Anyone who put's up any of that stuff is a twit. Same kinda people who shout about their private lives over the phone.

I'm quite proud of my baloobas pictures...and I think my kids will be to. Finally, I can assure you that have a strong appreciation for the need for privacy, obviously you missed the last line of my previous post.
 

Number2

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It will be interesting to see how the younger generation use the new media of social networking to influence the outcome of elections in their constituancies - and how the politicians try to get in on the act.
 

Watcher2

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I really hope they get something like this through quickly. I dont use twitface or Beebbook and I wouldn't like someone who does post pictures of me on those sites just because I was in the same pub as them, or park, or wherever. That in my view is an infringement of my privacy.
 

The Caped Cod

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You'd have to wonder what people are putting up, and how other people can see it. My facebook page has hundreds of pictures of me absolutely bananas, but no one can see them except for my friends (okay, with 500 odd, chances are there are people there that I'm not exactly bessie mates with) and even if they could, what'd be the big revelation.

Notwithstanding that, I do support the EU's stance.
Ha ha ha! Only your friends can seee them! Good one. The amount of third party "friends" who's pictures I could access simply because they tagged on of my "friends" was incredible. Plus, where exactly are all your pictures stored?
 

Tea Party Patriot

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I really hope they get something like this through quickly. I dont use twitface or Beebbook and I wouldn't like someone who does post pictures of me on those sites just because I was in the same pub as them, or park, or wherever. That in my view is an infringement of my privacy.
This in an interesting observation, but also how to legislate on it. To cover protection in a case like this would all photographs have to blur out all bar those who are the subject matter. Newspaper photos of crowds at concerts, matches etc.

Is it even possible to legislate on it without making all photographic material subject to image rights when a human subject is in question. Could cause a headache and a minefield for EU lawyers.
 

evercloserunion

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I thought the thread title was referring to the political right. Forgetting them is something I would definitely support! :D
 

Watcher2

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This in an interesting observation, but also how to legislate on it. To cover protection in a case like this would all photographs have to blur out all bar those who are the subject matter. Newspaper photos of crowds at concerts, matches etc.

Is it even possible to legislate on it without making all photographic material subject to image rights when a human subject is in question. Could cause a headache and a minefield for EU lawyers.
My initial take on what is proposed is someone like me would have a right to request the poster to blur my face. Obviously not ideal because it would be a case of shutting the door after the horse had bolted but I think it would be a nice way of appeasing someone like me.

Such sites would then be made provide editing tools in order to blur the people in the pictures.

Not rocket science I think.
 

Libero

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Though not a social networking site, this has application for Politics.ie

Just think of all the shameful and regrettable posts one might want to have deleted from the message archives. Maybe DC could offer it as a service one pays for, with a special bulk rate for the FF hacks.
 

Watcher2

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This in an interesting observation, but also how to legislate on it. To cover protection in a case like this would all photographs have to blur out all bar those who are the subject matter. Newspaper photos of crowds at concerts, matches etc.

Is it even possible to legislate on it without making all photographic material subject to image rights when a human subject is in question. Could cause a headache and a minefield for EU lawyers.
On second thoughts, why not legislate against someone posting pictures of people without obtaining their consent? Why should someone have the automatic right to post images of other people on such sites?

To my mind, no one has such right, especially posting images of people not posing for the picture. So, the legislation would cover people not consenting to their imaging being posted. That is an easy one to cover. So, to comply with the legislation, before posting the pictures on a public site, you simply blur all those not posing with you. The legislation could be specific to social networking sites. Photographs in news papers etc like attending matches to which you refer, I agree would be impossible to regulate.
 

Tea Party Patriot

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Though not a social networking site, this has application for Politics.ie

Just think of all the shameful and regrettable posts one might want to have deleted from the message archives. Maybe DC could offer it as a service one pays for, with a special bulk rate for the FF hacks.
On a serious note the law could well have implications well beyond social networking sites and cover this type of forum as well. It would certainly set a precedent that could be built on should someone decide to take a test case.

I have an internet site which retails to a niche market, I have recently added a community forum to it, which is proving quite successful in generating traffic. So personally I will be watching this development quite closely as the users naturally have profiles, and not anonymous in most cases like here, so are quite clearly identifiable.

It could also quite clearly be argued that discussion forums are social networking of a different kind. While a lot of us beat our drums here as is quite clear from a lot of the posting, it is still social networking of a kind. Who the hell would want to listen to most of our politicals opinions all night down the pub :D
 

Al.

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Personally given the recent statement by the head of Google, that students would be looking to change their names by deed poll in a few years time because, of the repercussions of posting personal information to social networking sites I think this proposed legislation is a good thing.

While I am an advocate of free speech I am also an advocate of the right to protect personal information. Legislation in this area is badly needed and would be indeed welcomed.

EU calls for 'right to be forgotten' on internet - Europe, World News - Independent.ie
No, this has nothing to do with protecting personal information. It has to do with the government granting rights (and possessing the means to take them all away at a whim) instead of rights residing with the people (and/or granted by a higher power). Have people forgotten the resemblance between the Charter of Fundamental Rights and the "Basic Rights, Freedoms, and Duties of Citizens of the USSR" in Chapter 7 of the Soviet Constitution? Article 52 section 1 of the Charter is the most explicit in history in saying that the government decides what rights you have:
Any limitation on the exercise of the rights and freedoms recognised by this Charter must be provided for by law and respect the essence of those rights and freedoms. Subject to the principle of proportionality, limitations may be made only if they are necessary and genuinely meet objectives of general interest recognised by the Union or the need to protect the rights and freedoms of others.
So your "rights" granted by the government are subject to the objectives of the EU, as are limitations that can be legislated into being at a whim. (The superfluous words "of general interest recognised by" can mean anything at all.) And remember, there is no writ of habeas corpus in the EU. You have no right to face your accusers and can be tried without your knowledge, without your being able to defend yourself before your accusers. Like having your rights decided arbitrarily for you?

(Oh yes; forgot that this legislation, if rubber-stamped by Brussels—there is no democratic process in Brussels, never forget that—must pass muster in Berlin first, to get their rubber stamp too. Can't make a move in Brussels without the Bundestag and Bundesrat's say-so!)
 
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