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EU no deal plans - whats going to happen?

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Deleted member 51920

How bad will it be for the UK realistically when they leave the EU?
Will they have medicines and food?
Or is it project fear?
 


SPN

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They won't leave.

Article 50 will be extended to allow time for a General Election or a new Referendum.


However, if that doesn't happen, their economy will grind to a halt within two weeks (if it hasn't already happened in the weeks leading up to the date).

"Everybody hates us, we don't care" and all that.
 
D

Deleted member 51920

No I think they will leave with no deal
Most other options are impossible now
No deal is going to happen
So whats next?
 

SideysGhost

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No I think they will leave with no deal
Most other options are impossible now
No deal is going to happen
So whats next?
I agree, they seem determined to go with No Deal, and the plan all along has been to string the entire EU along with bullshyte pretend "negotiations" to run down the clock. They were hoping (as usual) the EU would never be able to get its act together across 27 countries and they could dust off the old 19th century "balance of power" playbook and play everyone off against one another. They tried this over and over and over and over again the last two years. Then coming up with ridiculous excuse after ridiculous excuse - all these MPs, from all parties, really found NI remaining in the customs union to be absolutely intolerable as a fundamental matter of inviolable principle? Really? You actually believe that? It's transparent bullshyte.

It never worked, but they genuinely can't conceive of any other way to interact with Europe, so they just kept trying.

Because they are so delusional they also genuinely Believe that Britain is an economic powerhouse that the impoverished Europeans are desperate to keep trading with, along with the rest of the world. The whole world is gagging to snuggle up to Britain, in their heads, so therefore No Deal is No Problem.

They are fncked, basically. Most of their manufacturing, in particular the car industry, will grind to a halt in a matter of hours. By the end of the first week supermarket shelves will be bare and hospitals will be running out of medicines, and Dover will be an epic clusterfnck with thousands of lorries backed up. By the second week electricity and petrol rationing, like during the 70s Oil Crisis, will be in effect.

By the third week there'll be serious civil unrest and riots.

It's not "project fear", it's the biggest impending crisis and total breakdown of a society Europe has seen since the collapse of Yugoslavia.

And they are doing it themselves. Delicious.
 

cunnyfunt

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No I think they will leave with no deal
Most other options are impossible now
No deal is going to happen
So whats next?
I'm praying for a no deal exit! Because when the wheels DONT come off despite all the remoaners best efforts etc, it'll just encourage other countries to get the fk out of the failing union.
Plus I cant wait to hear the BS reasons all the vested interests will spew trying to explain why the wheels didnt come off...
 

SideysGhost

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I'm praying for a no deal exit! Because when the wheels DONT come off despite all the remoaners best efforts etc, it'll just encourage other countries to get the fk out of the failing union.
Plus I cant wait to hear the BS reasons all the vested interests will spew trying to explain why the wheels didnt come off...
And when the wheels DO come off....do you and all your little gaggle of alt-right fncwit cockwombling d1ckheads promise to fnck aff away from p.ie with all yer toxic incel shyte, and never darken the place with your stench ever again? Yes?

No. Didn't think so. Fncking spoofers, chancers and bluffers the lot of ye.
 

derryman

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How bad will it be for the UK realistically when they leave the EU?
Will they have medicines and food?
Or is it project fear?
I can't speak for anyone bar myself, but I am truly scared of the potential consequences. I know the 26 counties will be fine, but we in the 6 counties are in a very vulnerable position on economic and political fronts. We are highly exposed to e terrorists, not the type with the mask and gun, but the type with the big bank account and the band and batten. The rich will put the squeeze on the workers and the other mob will have us back where they have always wanted us. Behind a border with our friends to the south more occupied with self preservation again, and our enemies to the east turning a blind eye. These are dangerous times for us.
 

petaljam

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No I think they will leave with no deal
Most other options are impossible now
No deal is going to happen
Me too, I think they've run down the clock at this stage - apparently deliberately. A BBC journalist pointed out recently on the radio that for the first 12 months after the referendum the minister responsible for Brexit had a few desultory meetings with his EU counterparts, compared to the last six months where the PM is involved almost full time with it.

I think they really imagined that just by playing dead they would get whatever they wanted - which seems to have been EU status without paying for it.

(I was surprised to hear that level of criticism from them - the UK media has been shockingly ready to go along with the government's assurances that it was all going pretty real, really.)

So whats next?
Troops on the streets, according the UK government themselves now.
 

Toland

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I agree, they seem determined to go with No Deal, and the plan all along has been to string the entire EU along with bullshyte pretend "negotiations" to run down the clock.
You're not defining who "they" are. Upon that hangs the dilemma.

Because, whatever about the crowd of arrogant coalition of xenophobes, nostalgia-ridden blimps and ideologically disabled free-market wonkers that are blocking anything from happening in the HoC, thus allowing the UK to career towards the cliff, the great British public is slowly beginning to change its mind. And the indications are that that process is accelerating.

I fear your fond hopes of total economic disaster for the UK may yet be let down.
 

Toland

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Me too, I think they've run down the clock at this stage - apparently deliberately. A BBC journalist pointed out recently on the radio that for the first 12 months after the referendum the minister responsible for Brexit had a few desultory meetings with his EU counterparts, compared to the last six months where the PM is involved almost full time with it.

I think they really imagined that just by playing dead they would get whatever they wanted - which seems to have been EU status without paying for it.

(I was surprised to hear that level of criticism from them - the UK media has been shockingly ready to go along with the government's assurances that it was all going pretty real, really.)


Troops on the streets, according the UK government themselves now.
What's next?

A second referendum. Inevitably.

The entire commercial, industrial and economic establishment is now roaring "catastrophe" "armageddon" "the abyss" "cataclysm" "meltdown" practically in unison.

Maybe I'm being overly optimistic, but I refuse to believe they don't know where the handbrake is.
 

petaljam

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What's next?

A second referendum. Inevitably.

The entire commercial, industrial and economic establishment is now roaring "catastrophe" "armageddon" "the abyss" "cataclysm" "meltdown" practically in unison.
Too late, IMO. They were too keen to say it was all ok in the immediate aftermath of the result, thus giving credit to the "project fear" claims of the Leavers.

Maybe I'm being overly optimistic, but I refuse to believe they don't know where the handbrake is.
There isn't one, unless the government falls. That's possible but the opposition is no more united on this than the Tories. Corbyn is still opposed to a second referendum.
 

Toland

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Too late, IMO. They were too keen to say it was all ok in the immediate aftermath of the result, thus giving credit to the "project fear" claims of the Leavers.
We're roughly in agreement on that. Though most just either shut up completely or weren't loud enough in their protestations, rather than saying it was all okay.


There isn't one, unless the government falls. That's possible but the opposition is no more united on this than the Tories. Corbyn is still opposed to a second referendum.
I see your point. And Theresa May seems to be suffering from Stockholm Syndrome in relation to her own clearly useless deal. Yet I refuse to believe that there are no adults in the room.

There is clearly a highly dangerous game of chicken going on, which means that Brexit could easily happen by accident, but the balance of probabilities points to either the police intervening and restoring order with greater or lesser downstream consequences or somebody swerving at the last minute.

It does seem necessary to wrest May's hands from the steering wheel fairly lively, though. And the situation in which Jeremy Corbyn appears to be the only other person within reach of that wheel does not help calm nerves.
 

petaljam

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We're roughly in agreement on that. Though most just either shut up completely or weren't loud enough in their protestations, rather than saying it was all okay.

I see your point. And Theresa May seems to be suffering from Stockholm Syndrome in relation to her own clearly useless deal. Yet I refuse to believe that there are no adults in the room.
Name one, and what s/he can do this morning.

There is clearly a highly dangerous game of chicken going on, which means that Brexit could easily happen by accident,
I'm sorry Toland but you are actually delusional here. It's not about Brexit happening by accident now, it's a no-deal crash out happening by default. Probably by accident, or at least through recklessness and a lack of any other vision. Their own recklessness is now (at last) scaring them, but they still have no other vision. And now, verylittle time as well.

but the balance of probabilities points to either the police intervening and restoring order with greater or lesser downstream consequences or somebody swerving at the last minute.
Who, and how?

It does seem necessary to wrest May's hands from the steering wheel fairly lively, though. And the situation in which Jeremy Corbyn appears to be the only other person within reach of that wheel does not help calm nerves.
Well exactly. The government may fall - though the signs are that it won't because nobody else actually wants to step up - and if it does, Corbyn is committed to leaving too.

And if it doesn't, there is no mechanism to rerun the referendum and no potential leader in the Tory wings with a clear enough Remain position to impose their wishes on the Party.
 

Toland

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Who, and how?
It's ultimately got to come from the House of Commons.

I know precisely what you mean as you shake your head sadly at that one.

Though, for what it's worth, the appalling Corbyn is under an awful lot of pressure to come out publicly for a 2nd referendum. Maybe that'll work.

But one thing is worth saying: the remainer Tories have been soft pedalling and tragically late in their threats to resign the whip. Even the latest declarations of the most prominent remainer backbenchers have been decaffeinated. What was it one of them said the other day? That she'd have to resign the whip if a no-deal brexit became the central project of the government, adding that there were a couple more well-known backbenchers who'd do the same? Something like that I think it was. Pathetic. More get-out holes than a strainer.
 

petaljam

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It's ultimately got to come from the House of Commons.

I know precisely what you mean as you shake your head sadly at that one.

Though for what it's worth, Corbyn is under an awful lot of pressure to come out publicly for a 2nd referendum. Maybe that'll work.
He can't, IMO. Not without completely discrediting himself and also creating a split that would affect not just his party but the whole country.

I wish there were another way, and like Derryman it really worries me for NI on one hand but also for close family in London several of whom work in very exposed fields or companies on the other. But I just can't see a mechanism to stop it at this stage.
 

Toland

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He can't, IMO. Not without completely discrediting himself and also creating a split that would affect not just his party but the whole country.

I wish there were another way, and like Derryman it really worries me for NI on one hand but also for close family in London several of whom work in very exposed fields or companies on the other. But I just can't see a mechanism to stop it at this stage.
Well, I sincerely hope you're wrong. But public opinion does appear to be moving -- possibly too slowly, but moving.
 

petaljam

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I hope I'm wrong too. But what is the mechanism for a second referendum now at this stage?
I mean before dropping out altogether.
 

bokuden

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Listening to helen Macentee on morning ireland now being asked about the plans for the border in the event of a no deal brexit. An absolute car crash. The government have NO concrete plans. What an utter joke this FG led government .
 

mr_anderson

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I'm not following Brexit much.
Can anyone explain to me why they just can't have the same deal as Norway or Switzerland ?
 

Toland

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I hope I'm wrong too. But what is the mechanism for a second referendum now at this stage?
I mean before dropping out altogether.
It starts with extending the Article 50 period (possibly on the grounds that all parties need more time to prepare for a no-deal Brexit). And is followed (hopefully) by a continued shift in public opinion.
 


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