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EU proposed fine @ 250k per person for countries refusing asylum seekers

GDPR

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At present the EU has a flagship scheme to re-distribute 160,000 asylum seekers from countries like Greece and Italy to countries across the continent. To date a small fractions of this 2015 scheme has come to fruition. The updated proposal is if a country has received 150% 'fair share' (based on population and economy size of a country) of asylum seekers, then surplus numbers are to be re-distributed to other EU countries. If a country refuses, the proposal is to fine them €250,000 per refused claimant. This is a follow up on the Dublin regulation which was designed to stop what has become known as "asylum shopping", whereby migrants make multiple asylum claims across Europe. The UK and Ireland can opt out of asylum policies which the UK has done and Denmark is exempt. EU officials are hopeful that along with the recent migrant deal with Turkey that this would reduce the pressure on countries like Greece and Italy.

There is opposition from Poland, Slovakia, Hungary and Czech Republic who refuse to implement the allocated quota. Poland had previously agreed to take 7,000 asylum and their refusal could see fines of €1.75 billion. Hungary has announced plans to hold a referendum on the EU's resettlement plans. The current migration crisis has left Greece and Italy with the majority of asylum seeker cases. Last summer Germany agreed to take in all Syrian asylum seekers which prompted the movement of huge numbers of migrants and refugees into the EU via Greece and the Western Balkans. Fences subsequently went up along borders, which lead to a drop in numbers but left migrants and refugees stranded in Greece.

This ongoing saga has the greatest potential for self destruction of the EU as is currently stands. There is a striking absence of unity on this issue with countries increasingly going their own way. Is the prospect of a stick going to help in dealing with this issue, will it increase or decrease national tensions within the EU? Is such a 'fair deal' possible or is it yet more pie in the sky that may precipitate a country opting to exit the EU in opposition to migrant quotas being forced on them? Where does Ireland stand in all this, thoughts?

Migrant crisis: EU plans penalties for refusing asylum seekers - BBC News
 


damus

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Are they also proposing a no refunds policy in the event that their application is deemed bogus?
 

stopdoingstuff

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I propose that the nation states of the EU scramble their fighter jets and wipe Brussels off the map.
 

A Voice

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What about compo if the "refugees" or "migrants" turn out to be terrorists or embryonic terrorists?

The EU commission can stick its head back up its backside where it belongs.
 

Truth.ie

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Gives you a rough idea how much each individual "refugee" costs over a period of say 10 years.

You cant have such a barmy refugee system and expect to have a standard of living that say our parents enjoyed.

Incidentally, the decision last year to change the definition of what a refugee actually is, was taken without any serious debate or consent.
Those who made the decision can hardly expect others (who objected) to pay for it now that it has become a clusterf#ck.

It's like if I made an open invitation of Facebook for a party at my house, and then asking the neighbours to pay for the damage.
 

Dubstudent

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Funny how it's tailored to suit Germany (disproportionate amount etc). The country that openly encouraged the rush across Europe's borders. They spoke for themselves by doing that, not Europe. We should remember that.

As for Ireland? To hear Germany begging for ''burden sharing'' of migrants when they weren't too fond of the same phrase when requested by Ireland on another issue should signal well enough what we should do.
 

off with their heads

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this institution is that removed from reality it has become psychotic
 

Clanrickard

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At present the EU has a flagship scheme to re-distribute 160,000 asylum seekers from countries like Greece and Italy to countries across the continent. To date a small fractions of this 2015 scheme has come to fruition. The updated proposal is if a country has received 150% 'fair share' (based on population and economy size of a country) of asylum seekers, then surplus numbers are to be re-distributed to other EU countries. If a country refuses, the proposal is to fine them €250,000 per refused claimant. This is a follow up on the Dublin regulation which was designed to stop what has become known as "asylum shopping", whereby migrants make multiple asylum claims across Europe. The UK and Ireland can opt out of asylum policies which the UK has done and Denmark is exempt. EU officials are hopeful that along with the recent migrant deal with Turkey that this would reduce the pressure on countries like Greece and Italy.

There is opposition from Poland, Slovakia, Hungary and Czech Republic who refuse to implement the allocated quota. Poland had previously agreed to take 7,000 asylum and their refusal could see fines of €1.75 billion. Hungary has announced plans to hold a referendum on the EU's resettlement plans. The current migration crisis has left Greece and Italy with the majority of asylum seeker cases. Last summer Germany agreed to take in all Syrian asylum seekers which prompted the movement of huge numbers of migrants and refugees into the EU via Greece and the Western Balkans. Fences subsequently went up along borders, which lead to a drop in numbers but left migrants and refugees stranded in Greece.

This ongoing saga has the greatest potential for self destruction of the EU as is currently stands. There is a striking absence of unity on this issue with countries increasingly going their own way. Is the prospect of a stick going to help in dealing with this issue, will it increase or decrease national tensions within the EU? Is such a 'fair deal' possible or is it yet more pie in the sky that may precipitate a country opting to exit the EU in opposition to migrant quotas being forced on them? Where does Ireland stand in all this, thoughts?

Migrant crisis: EU plans penalties for refusing asylum seekers - BBC News
Not a hope it will get through.
 

Disillusioned democrat

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Another 2% in favour of Brexit....you'd assume someone in Brussels WANTS the UK to leave.
 

Truth.ie

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this institution is that removed from reality it has become psychotic
Imagine living in Greece or Spain, no work, evicted from your home, made a minority in your local town, competing with fruit picking jobs with illegal migrants....and reading this in the paper.
 

Roll_On

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I suspect Germany's plan was initially to open it's boarders to waves of migrants for 'asylum' hand pick the uni grads and reject the illiterate sheppards with 3 wives, encourage them to 'apply elsewhere in the EU' i.e. Netherlands, Ireland, Scandinavia etc.

But there seems to have been a change of tack, I wonder what the new plan is. No doubt German interests will be at the heart of it.
 

Truth.ie

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Hopefully, Poland, Hungary, and some of the countries where 250k is still seen as a lot of money (as opposed to a figure pulled from someones ass) will let their people vote on staying in the EU.
 

jmcc

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Imagine living in Greece or Spain, no work, evicted from your home, made a minority in your local town, competing with fruit picking jobs with illegal migrants....and reading this in the paper.
Wouldn't be surprised that ordinary decent people don't start killing these EUnuchs.
 

off with their heads

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it was all so different when Cameron and sarkozy were mouthing viva bengazi.......pair of utter c@nts :-x
 

Kershaw

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What this shows us is that the EU estimate the economic contribution of the average refugee to their host country is at -250,000 euros. Yes, the market value of a refugee is negative €250,000.

This does go strikingly against the narrative that migrants are a net positive for the host economy which is the usual spin by globalist Goldman Sachs bankers pushing for mass immigration. Of course it's good for inflating prices in property market and increasing consumption so I can see their angle.
 

Passer-by

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Hopefully, Poland, Hungary, and some of the countries where 250k is still seen as a lot of money (as opposed to a figure pulled from someones ass) will let their people vote on staying in the EU.
They are free to do so but can hardly complain since the EU Treaties explicitly stated the EU member states intend to develop common policies in this area when they joined.
 

Truth.ie

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Wouldn't be surprised that ordinary decent people don't start killing these EUnuchs.
All Empires eventually come tumbling down.
Won't happen in the West though. More likely to be our Eastern European brethren who will rise up. God speed the day.
 

Shpake

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I think Nigel Farage will make hay out of this one. Could not come at a worse time for David Cameron and his "Stay" group.
If I was looking for a word to describe this whole scenario, "bizarre" is the label that fits it best. What do the tribesmen of Afghanistan got to do with the "butter mountains" and "milk lakes" that the EU used to contend with. The EU has got to be a different baist altogether entirely.
The nature of the baist is changing too. In previous years we used to see all these placards on the side of the road like : "Project for ring-road, part-funded by the EU... etc."
"Grand work the lads are doing in Brussels " is what our politicians wanted us to think, but I assure you, even way back then I was having my misgivings... that at least some sort of payback time would arrive.
Then came the coercion "light" where we had to hold our referendums (referenda?) again until we came up with the correct result.
The slaps got a little harder when our taxpayers had to pay back the loans of our busted banks.
Now it looks like coercion not so light where they divvy out fines.... and pretty massive ones. €250,000 per refused claimant, Whew!

I might be reading too much into this, I'm trying to figure out why. What's this all about. Is it simply what it says on the tin... i.e that we want to uphold this lofty ideal of giving every citizen of the world and his granny the right to claim asylum until the last court of appeal (and after that they can stay anyway) or is there some deeper geo-political strategy at play.
Suggestion... now that the U.S has it's own oil and are miffed by the Saudis and their Wahabi fundamentalist ideology they are pulling back from the Middle East.
So the Greater EU brown noses Turkey so that we can get a foothold there near the oil and gas fields.
Putin of course, is playing a long game in trying to recreate his old Soviet Union and sooner or later will try to up the oil price and squeeze Yurrup for what he can get.
Sorry, I'm just letting my imagination run. I might not be that at all, it might be simply Angela Merkel has thrown one enormous wobbly and is enlisting the rest of Europe in "burden sharing" pure and simple.
 

Truth.ie

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They are free to do so but can hardly complain since the EU Treaties explicitly stated the EU member states intend to develop common policies in this area when they joined.
The decision to open the doors was taken unilaterally by Merkel and after they joined.
The first time most Europeans heard about it was on the news.
 

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