EU - related events after Brexit ref, up to triggering of Article 50



Novos

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Another seriously important piece of information that the remain campaigners failed to capitalise on.

The presidency, which now only comes round every 14 tears is a great opportunity to shape the future direction of the EU.

Would it not have made tremendous sense for cameron to have scheduled the referendum after wards ?
Has any country actually shaped the future of the EU because they were holding the Presidency?
I'm just curious. I thought it was more a figurehead thing.
 

purpledon

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You're right, how could one even conceive that Britain could govern itself.
When has Britain ever had to do without either the colonies or the EU?

When it lost the last of the colonies in the 1960s it had to call the IMF in less than a decade.
 

Gurdiev77

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5 targets for the Dutch EU presidency to succeed – POLITICO

Reading the attached article on the Dutch presidency, it does suggest that there is an opportunity to shape the agenda, and to prioritise issues. I would expect that the better politicians can always capitalise on an opportunity to chair proceedings.

At the very least it would seem an opportunity to showcase to the population how it all works .

I think it was foolish to call the referendum before this presidential term
 

statsman

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You're right, how could one even conceive that Britain could govern itself.
If you can't see that these are worrying times for the UK, then that's your ideological blindness. They may be fine, they may be screwed, only time will tell.
 

ivnryn

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Just on RTE News at 11.

Belgium have proposed they will step in and take up the presidency of the European Council next year in place of UK.

Belgium are one of the INNER 6 .. the original 6 who set up the EU way back ..
With 6 months per country, that is once every 13 years. Belgium were last in the position in 2010.

These countries have/will have held the position since Belgium last held it:

Hungary
Poland
Denmark
Cyprus
Ireland
Lithuania
Greece
Italy
Latvia
Luxembourg
Slovakia
Malta

These countries have not held it since Belgium last held it (2010):
(bold means that they are scheduled after 2017)

Austria
Bulgaria
Czech Republic
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Netherlands
Portugal
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
Romania

This country was admitted after 2010

Croatia

----------

Fairness requires that one of the non-bold countries who haven't had a spot since 2010 get the UK's one before it is given to Belgium.
 

Dame_Enda

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It's odd, really. The UK is doing stuff to extract themselves from the EU day-to-day, then saying Brexit won't happen before 2019:

Theresa May to Angela Merkel: UK will need time to prepare for Brexit | Politics | The Guardian
She is trying to keep the party together in case Parliament has to vote on a Brexit deal. The Opposition has a majority in the House of Lords since the hereditary peers were thrown out in 1997-8 so will no doubt delay ratification until May uses the 1949 Parliament Act to ram.it through, which would further put Tory unity under strain as the Commons would have to vote for that. And that's assuming the Commons passes a Brexit treaty to begin with.

The possibility Brexit won't happen remains. I think at the very least we are a GE away from it. Now it's true that Article 50 says that after triggered it ends EU membership after two years. However member states can extend the deadline unanimously and I suspect for commercial and political reasons if the UK asked for this they would get it.
 

Spanner Island

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That last point is certainly true. But they will have to live with whatever decisions are made, so it might be best to be fully engaged while they still can.
They can be fully engaged without holding the Presidency... although regardless... they're going to have no influence and will have to basically put up with whatever EU decisions are made in the next few years without any real say on those decisions...

And if they don't like that... then they need to trigger Article 50 and get on with it...

Or they can use their veto where available in the interim... and really p!ss off their EU 'partners'.

I'd imagine any developments would be side issues during a UK Presidency with all the focus on Brexit...

The UK is toast now with regard to the EU.

They're off to forge a new global strategy for themselves like it's 1973... or 1955... or whatever...

I have my doubts as to how prominent, influential and effective they'll be in their new strategy with a population of ca. 65 million people in a world of over 6 billion...

The world has changed beyond recognition since 1973 and the continuing trend is for countries to form blocks and negotiate based on size etc.

The UK is obviously bucking that trend and feels it's better off alone...

Time will tell I guess...
 
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GabhaDubh

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Another seriously important piece of information that the remain campaigners failed to capitalise on.

The presidency, which now only comes round every 14 tears is a great opportunity to shape the future direction of the EU.

Would it not have made tremendous sense for cameron to have scheduled the referendum after wards ?
If Cameron was supposedly such a astute politician he should have scheduled Brexit referendum during the EU Presidency and tip the scales.
 

statsman

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If Cameron was supposedly such a astute politician he should have scheduled Brexit referendum during the EU Presidency and tip the scales.
If he was that astute, he'd still be PM.
 
T

Thomas_IV

If he was that astute, he'd still be PM.
In the end of the day he realised, what a folly he has committed by even promising the people this referendum. But let´s be frank, the British were never really committed within the EU, all they wanted is to have special conditions for themselves in the first place and mostly looking and talking "over the fence" but not really with any ambition to improve things within the EU, although Cameron often said otherwise.

The Brexit result is the last Tribute to the very Thatcherism that has put the UK on the "outer circle" of the EU and not the inner because for the latter, the UK had to be more committed to the European idea and even feel themselves as being European.

Just as a side note. I was in Portugal, at the Algarve, in the week of the Brexit Referendum and on the morning of the 23rd June, some young chaps passed a bus stop where I was waiting with my wife for the bus to take us into the centre of the town where he had our Holiday. Some of them just was talking to another of his company and I just catched the phrase "more British not European" and he said the latter with some tone of contempt in his voice. I´m sure that this chap finally got what he wanted, whether it is the same his fellow citizens who live and work in Portugal and other EU member states around the Med wanted is quite another Thing. I rather doubt that the latter are now that happy with the result for it might threaten their very existence in those parts of Europe when the UK finally leaves the EU.

As the Euro was still going on and the English had their final game vs Iceland, we passed some of the various localities in which the game was screened. Those English fans didn´t even bother to rise from their places when the British anthem was played. Well, that was two days after the Brexit vote and I don´t know whether this has got something to do with the Brexit. The thing is, that I haven´t seen any British citizens remaining seated while their anthem was played and the many of them are always so proud of their country and all the symbols that go with it. That was curious, but as I said, just as a side note.
 

Gurdiev77

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She is trying to keep the party together in case Parliament has to vote on a Brexit deal. The Opposition has a majority in the House of Lords since the hereditary peers were thrown out in 1997-8 so will no doubt delay ratification until May uses the 1949 Parliament Act to ram.it through, which would further put Tory unity under strain as the Commons would have to vote for that. And that's assuming the Commons passes a Brexit treaty to begin with.

The possibility Brexit won't happen remains. I think at the very least we are a GE away from it. Now it's true that Article 50 says that after triggered it ends EU membership after two years. However member states can extend the deadline unanimously and I suspect for commercial and political reasons if the UK asked for this they would get it.
A lot could change after the Elections in France and Germany next year .

We could end up with a seriously restructured EU , rather than one which sees the big players abandoning the cause.

Of the the smaller , poorer , newer members are the ones who wont wish to see any change at all, and will probably have the balance of the voting.
 

Gurdiev77

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They can be fully engaged without holding the Presidency... although regardless... they're going to have no influence and will have to basically put up with whatever EU decisions are made in the next few years without any real say on those decisions...

And if they don't like that... then they need to trigger Article 50 and get on with it...

Or they can use their veto where available in the interim... and really p!ss off their EU 'partners'.

I'd imagine any developments would be side issues during a UK Presidency with all the focus on Brexit...

The UK is toast now with regard to the EU.

They're off to forge a new global strategy for themselves like it's 1973... or 1955... or whatever...

I have my doubts as to how prominent, influential and effective they'll be in their new strategy with a population of ca. 65 million people in a world of over 6 billion...

The world has changed beyond recognition since 1973 and the continuing trend is for countries to form blocks and negotiate based on size etc.

The UK is obviously bucking that trend and feels it's better off alone...

Time will tell I guess...
to be accurate just just over half the population agrees with uour analysis, and just under half the population is still in a state of shock and awe at whats happened.

It appears the wealth creators and entrepreneurs are mostly in the latter category.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
There's the little matter of the Austrian presidential election re-run to come as well so the whole immigration/EU free movement issue could deliver Brussels another kick in the goolies soon enough.
 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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when the brits slam the door shut on EU migrants, those same migrants will flood Ireland. The Irish in ireland will be like the american Indians in upstate New York. Swamped, outnumbered, and just a legacy of bygone days.
 

GDPR

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The continuing hysterical reaction to Brexit is amusing. But sure as night follows day, a deal will be agreed, and we will be mind numbingly bored with the whole thing long before then. My own thoughts are that a country's borders are sovereign, and no union of convenience should over-step the mark, like the EU has.
 

GDPR

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when the brits slam the door shut on EU migrants, those same migrants will flood Ireland. The Irish in ireland will be like the american Indians in upstate New York. Swamped, outnumbered, and just a legacy of bygone days.
Falls under the fiction section.
 

blokesbloke

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I'd have thought that doing things like not taking the presidency might actually make the process of negotiation even more difficult. While you're still members of the club, you should accept your responsibilities as members. To refuse to do so seems to me to run the risk of annoying the people you need to make deals with.
Hmmm - in the same way British representatives were excluded from the last EU meeting despite still being legal members, and British MEPs heckled in the parliament asking what they were still doing there?

I really getting tired of this pretence that the distrust between the UK and the EU is completely one-sided and that the EU are wonderful and progressive and only want to co-operate in a friendly manner.

It's utter bullshít, and it's partly why the UK voted to Leave.
 


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