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EU set to ban olive oil jugs for restaurants....finally!!!


D

Dylan2010

I don't know how many sleepless nights I've had over this one, but finally those over worked and under paid officials have managed to set yet another marker down for those evil restaurant owners who are out to kill us when they get half a chance.

Well done EU we need lots more regulations like this. Personally I hope they crack down next on restaurants that give you milk in jugs, how do we even know they are from cows???? :cry:



EU to ban olive oil jugs from restaurants - Telegraph


"This is sort of thing that gets the EU a deservedly bad name. I shouldn't say so but I hope people disobey this ban," said an official.

"It will seem bonkers that olive oil jugs must go while vinegar bottles or refillable wine jugs can stay."

Responding to the ban, Martin Callanan MEP, the leader of the European Conservative and Reformist group, asked: "Is it April 1st?".

"With the euro crisis, a collapse in confidence in the EU, and a faltering economy surely the commission has more important things to worry about than banning refillable olive oil bottles? They should be seeking to reduce unnecessary packaging," he said.

A Defra spokesperson said: “While we welcome some of the new rules on improved labelling, we did not support this ban as it will likely lead to unnecessary waste and place added burdens on businesses.

“We will continue to work with the catering industry to help them adapt to these changes.”
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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First they came for exposed olive oil jugs....



....then they came for waitresses' exposed jugs.
 

dizillusioned

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Yeah I can see this happening in Europe alright. How are you supposed to put Olive oil on a table? Utter madness from over paid, underworked, bureaucrats
 

SilverSpurs

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I don't know how many sleepless nights I've had over this one, but finally those over worked and under paid officials have managed to set yet another marker down for those evil restaurant owners who are out to kill us when they get half a chance.

Well done EU we need lots more regulations like this. Personally I hope they crack down next on restaurants that give you milk in jugs, how do we even know they are from cows???? :cry:



EU to ban olive oil jugs from restaurants - Telegraph
This is why in 2017 the UK's small businesses umbrella body is expected to argue strongly for a No vote.
 

Dan_Murphy

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Isn't the problem of fake olive oil a very serious one though?

I recall reading somewhere that almost all olive oil is controlled by the mob, and that what most people buy is heavily diluted.
 

mr. jings

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My ma's Spanish - there's no way they're going to take this lying down.
 

GDPR

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I thought it was just for selling olive oil and bringing your own jars, or buying them to recycle next time around.

There was a problem in Spain a few years ago when people bought some olive oil which was contaminated with industrial stuff. Many people died and many suffered permanent disability because of that. But the oil could have been sold in sealed bottles; it would have had the same lethal effect.

The new EU rules will affect some Whole Foods stores which offer pour your own olive oil, lots of varieties, small self seal bottles just £2.50 + the cost of the oil.

The fashion nowadays is to have bread and other foods unsealed on open shelves, fish on ice in the front of the shop (on hot days too). The maggots are free.

I'd have thought that the EU should be more concerned about food contamination rather than olive oil.
 

BookFace

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this is the best news ive heard since they got that Banana problem straightened out.
 

Sync

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I love this story simply because it's opened my eyes to Olive Oil Times!

Widespread Backlash Over Refillable Olive Oil Bottle Ban

The telegraph are having kittens over this. I think they've more articles on it today than the beheading.

Rafael Sánchez de Puerta, president of the working group on olive oil of of European farmer federation Copa-Cogeca, said the strong reaction against the measure had come as a surprise.

“Perhaps we haven’t explained it well because really it’s a simple measure that is positive for everyone.”

The traditional ‘aceiteras‘ found on restaurant tables in countries such as Spain and Italy are detrimental in many ways. Their shape exposes the oil to light over a large surface area and the oil is also regularly exposed to air- two natural enemies of olive oil. And the fact that they usually never run out – restaurants tend to keep topping them up from 5l bottles of olive oil – is also undesirable, he said
Ah come on. Seriously?
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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dizillusioned

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So the vinegar's alright? I'm confused....
Apparently so. This makes no sense whatsoever. I can imagine all Greek Eateries implementing this law, if the oil is bad the customer kicks up stink.

Now I know many old timers in Ireland think oil oil is simply for sunbathing (true story only last week I presented my mother with olive oil salt and some bread she freaked, after tasting it, she liked it) but in Southern climes, olive oil is a staple.

Oil and vinegar HAS to be on the table for a salad, breads etc etc... This is the North trying to implement Northern standards on a way of life?
 

mr. jings

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Apparently so. This makes no sense whatsoever. I can imagine all Greek Eateries implementing this law, if the oil is bad the customer kicks up stink.

Now I know many old timers in Ireland think oil oil is simply for sunbathing (true story only last week I presented my mother with olive oil salt and some bread she freaked, after tasting it, she liked it) but in Southern climes, olive oil is a staple.

Oil and vinegar HAS to be on the table for a salad, breads etc etc... This is the North trying to implement Northern standards on a way of life?
When my ma came to Ireland in the late sixties, pretty much the only place she could get olive oil for cooking was in chemists, which is bizarrely enough about the only place you can buy cranberry juice in Spain these days for like a tenner a tiny bottle of cordial.
 

dizillusioned

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When my ma came to Ireland in the late sixties, pretty much the only place she could get olive oil for cooking was in chemists, which is bizarrely enough about the only place you can buy cranberry juice in Spain these days for like a tenner a tiny bottle of cordial.
We were only discussing this last week, she said exactly the same thing about olive oil and chemists. I know I now have a convert to using it, we have been trying her on different foods. She was amazed that a salad could be more than two lank lettuce leaves and a slice of ham and a few diced tomatoes..;)
 

ibis

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I thought it was just for selling olive oil and bringing your own jars, or buying them to recycle next time around.

There was a problem in Spain a few years ago when people bought some olive oil which was contaminated with industrial stuff. Many people died and many suffered permanent disability because of that. But the oil could have been sold in sealed bottles; it would have had the same lethal effect.

The new EU rules will affect some Whole Foods stores which offer pour your own olive oil, lots of varieties, small self seal bottles just £2.50 + the cost of the oil.

The fashion nowadays is to have bread and other foods unsealed on open shelves, fish on ice in the front of the shop (on hot days too). The maggots are free.

I'd have thought that the EU should be more concerned about food contamination rather than olive oil.
I don't think it applies to shops, just to restaurants. Alas, though, it's one of those regulations which makes complete sense in one way, and none at all in most others - primarily in the sense that most people couldn't give a toss about the problem it addresses.
 

FrankSpeaks

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I can see both sides to this law but on balance I think it is an utterly ridiculous decision.
 

kvran

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I don't know how many sleepless nights I've had over this one, but finally those over worked and under paid officials have managed to set yet another marker down for those evil restaurant owners who are out to kill us when they get half a chance.

Well done EU we need lots more regulations like this. Personally I hope they crack down next on restaurants that give you milk in jugs, how do we even know they are from cows???? :cry:



EU to ban olive oil jugs from restaurants - Telegraph
I am always amused when quite technical policies get such coverage, it's usually a reflection of the influence of the respective lobbyists. The Olive Oil Times article is a good summary of the motivations. As said it's supported by southern European countries and high quality producers should be thankful as it will prevent fraud, restaurants can no longer use the name of a high quality olive oil while filling the jugs up cheap stuff. It won't be wasteful if the bottle are returned to the producer refilled and resealed.

How many people would trust a bar tender to give you the brand of vodka/whiskey/rum etc that you asked for without seeing the bottle and if they give tesco whiskey when you asked for jameson they get to pocket the difference, its hard to tell the difference after a few. Any product that is priced based on quality should be subject to similar controls to prevent consumers getting screwed over by unscruplous businesses.

Obviously caveat emptor but I don't think people are as conscious with olive oil as wine. Who would accept a bottle of wine that was opened before being presented at the table.
 
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