EU Still Standing Today thread



EUrJokingMeRight

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You've spelled the 'Eu' incorrectly...

It's G-E-R-M-A-N-Y.

or

Greedy
Eurocrats
Removing
Money
Assets
Nations
Youth

for short!
 

GDPR

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Not only would the French storm the Elysée if she dared to try and re-introduce the Franc, there would be massive capital flight from France, exchange controls brought in as if it were a third world country, and French bonds would collapse.

Only on Pie is this sort of wibble a flyer.
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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First We Take Manhattan Then We Take Berlin:

 

TedHankey

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Like the companion thread on the euro, a place for news items highlighting the stability of the Union. Today, Austria's Freedom Party votes to endorse both the EU and the euro:

Eyeing an election, Austria's far-right Freedom Party commits to EU | Reuters
This is hardly highlighting the stability of the Union really though. Hofer says: "We need a real, subsidiary union" and Strache says: "Europe and the European Union need to be rethought ... we do not want a centralized European federal state." and "We do not want to abolish the euro today or tomorrow, but we want an honest, critical discussion at last".

Definitely not the "clear commitment" that the Reuters hack is trying to spin towards, in fact, if anything it's a genuine and real criticism. It would be far better to honestly address these unspoken issues than to be drum beating and flag waving.
 

GDPR

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This is hardly highlighting the stability of the Union really though. Hofer says: "We need a real, subsidiary union" and Strache says: "Europe and the European Union need to be rethought ... we do not want a centralized European federal state." and "We do not want to abolish the euro today or tomorrow, but we want an honest, critical discussion at last".

Definitely not the "clear commitment" that the Reuters hack is trying to spin towards, in fact, if anything it's a genuine and real criticism. It would be far better to honestly address these unspoken issues than to be drum beating and flag waving.
Those points have been made by supporters of the EU who argue for reforms. Only in cloud cuckoo land do we need such "anaylses" from extreme rightwing populist parties.

They are learning that outside the UK which is merrily going over a cliff there is no appetite for their sweeping solutions to the European democratic deficit. Good.
 

Breanainn

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This is hardly highlighting the stability of the Union really though. Hofer says: "We need a real, subsidiary union" and Strache says: "Europe and the European Union need to be rethought ... we do not want a centralized European federal state." and "We do not want to abolish the euro today or tomorrow, but we want an honest, critical discussion at last".

Definitely not the "clear commitment" that the Reuters hack is trying to spin towards, in fact, if anything it's a genuine and real criticism. It would be far better to honestly address these unspoken issues than to be drum beating and flag waving.
But it is essentially moving to the Polish and Hungarian positions, rather than seeking to smash the system, as was previously the case.
 

McDave

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The EU has survived the neo-liberal political and economic crisis which was crystallised by Lehmans quite impressively. It's flagship economic integration policy, the Euro, has also withstood massive internal and external pressures.

We've seen the high water mark of reactionary populism with Trump and Brexit. Let's hope the continental EU countries learn from the mistakes of Anglosphere nationalists and back away from divisive free market extremism. The cat isn't in the sack yet, but Macron and Merkel victories in particular should make for an interesting dynamic in the coming years.
 

GDPR

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The EU has survived the neo-liberal political and economic crisis which was crystallised by Lehmans quite impressively. It's flagship economic integration policy, the Euro, has also withstood massive internal and external pressures.

We've seen the high water mark of reactionary populism with Trump and Brexit. Let's hope the continental EU countries learn from the mistakes of Anglosphere nationalists and back away from divisive free market extremism. The cat isn't in the sack yet, but Macron and Merkel victories in particular should make for an interesting dynamic in the coming years.
For my money, the EU is fulfilling its basic raison d'etre, which is to shield Europeans from the follies of national govts. Is it perfect? No. How could it be? Never before have 27 countries come together to create a trading and judicial bloc that acts to provide basic security for the inhabitants and increase their life chances. Has it always made the right call? Of course not. But in its slow lumbering technocratic processes, it has actually prevented individual states from making really wrong ones - poor old Britain aside.

Its a monumental achievement and one we disparage at our peril.
 

PBP voter

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The EU has survived the neo-liberal political and economic crisis which was crystallised by Lehmans quite impressively. It's flagship economic integration policy, the Euro, has also withstood massive internal and external pressures.

We've seen the high water mark of reactionary populism with Trump and Brexit. Let's hope the continental EU countries learn from the mistakes of Anglosphere nationalists and back away from divisive free market extremism. The cat isn't in the sack yet, but Macron and Merkel victories in particular should make for an interesting dynamic in the coming years.
The EU promotes the neo-liberal agenda.

The EU's commitment to neoliberalism means its laws are designed to encourage private enterprise at the expense of public ownership.

Also he idea that the EU is a great protector of workers is hard to reconcile when it promotes zero-hours contracts under flexible labour market rules and it has deliberately weakened collective bargaining arrangements in the bailout countries.

As for the Euro-it's still a disaster.
 

TedHankey

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But it is essentially moving to the Polish and Hungarian positions, rather than seeking to smash the system, as was previously the case.
Perhaps a softening but definitely not a clear commitment to, or a highlight of the stability of, the EU.
 

EUrJokingMeRight

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The EU has survived the neo-liberal political and economic crisis which was crystallised by Lehmans quite impressively. It's flagship economic integration policy, the Euro, has also withstood massive internal and external pressures.

We've seen the high water mark of reactionary populism with Trump and Brexit. Let's hope the continental EU countries learn from the mistakes of Anglosphere nationalists and back away from divisive free market extremism. The cat isn't in the sack yet, but Macron and Merkel victories in particular should make for an interesting dynamic in the coming years.
Where are the audited accounts of the EU?
 

Mad as Fish

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Not only would the French storm the Elysée if she dared to try and re-introduce the Franc, there would be massive capital flight from France, exchange controls brought in as if it were a third world country, and French bonds would collapse.

Only on Pie is this sort of wibble a flyer.
Didn't we hear that said about Brexit? The UK still exists as a functioning country as far as I am aware, although that is relative of course.
 

TedHankey

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For my money, the EU is fulfilling its basic raison d'etre, which is to shield Europeans from the follies of national govts. Is it perfect? No. How could it be? Never before have 27 countries come together to create a trading and judicial bloc that acts to provide basic security for the inhabitants and increase their life chances. Has it always made the right call? Of course not. But in its slow lumbering technocratic processes, it has actually prevented individual states from making really wrong ones - poor old Britain aside.

Its a monumental achievement and one we disparage at our peril.
It's also worth remembering that the EU will destroy the lives of those on it's periphery in order to protect "vital" interests of a certain few. They will even conspire with and compel national governments to disenfranchise it's citizens. For me it's naive to suggest it's there to protect us, given it's structure.
 

Mad as Fish

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