Euro note question?

Twin Towers

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Why if the euro is a common currency are each countries notes identifiable by the serial number?

Was this to prevent a currency chaos in the event of a member state being ordered to stop issuing and that countries money could then be easily avoided?

We have already had rumours of German (X) shopkeepers refusing to accept Greek (Y) notes. Looking through my wallet the spanking new €50's are all Italian (S) :cool:

The 11 digit serial number on every note begins with a prefix showing which country issued it. German notes begin with an X, Greek notes start with a Y, Spain's have a V, France a U, Ireland T, Portugal M and Italy S. Belgium is Z, Cyprus G, Luxembourg I, Malta F, Netherlands P, Austria N, Slovenia H, Slovakia E and Finland L.

You can double check the issuer by adding the digits and adding again to arrive at a country code, eg: X50446027856.....(5+0+4+4+6+0+2+7+8+5+6) = 47, (4+7) = 11, (1+1) gives 2, the code number for Germany.
 


yehbut_nobut

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We have already had rumours of German (X) shopkeepers refusing to accept Greek (Y) notes.
I've not heard those rumours. Were they mentioned on P.ie. or elsewhere? Any links?
 

Sync

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Do you have to constantly be a lunatic? Is it never tiring for you? You have to give them serial numbers. The serial numbers have to mean something. Doesn't breaking it down by Country-Mint-issue number make the most sense? How else would you organise the numbering system?
 

Riadach

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You can double check the issuer by adding the digits and adding again to arrive at a country code, eg: X50446027856.....(5+0+4+4+6+0+2+7+8+5+6) = 47, (4+7) = 11, (1+1) gives 2, the code number for Germany.
But there are sixteen countries in the eurozone?
 

ibis

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Because they're printed by the individual countries. Assigning a country prefix means that countries don't have to cross-check their serial numbers.

Same system for telephones, domain names, etc etc...but perhaps the fact that we have a unique country code for Irish telephone numbers means that there's a secret plan to cut our telephones off from the rest of the world, eh?
 

ibis

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But there are sixteen countries in the eurozone?
The "X" is all that's required to identify it as Germany. Irish banknotes start with a "T".
 

kerdasi amaq

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Some letters have already been allotted to countries that haven't joined the Eurozone.

W is Denmark. R is Luxembourg. K is Sweden and J is the United Kingdom. I,Q, and O are not in use.
 

Odyessus

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Why if the euro is a common currency are each countries notes identifiable by the serial number?

Was this to prevent a currency chaos in the event of a member state being ordered to stop issuing and that countries money could then be easily avoided?

We have already had rumours of German (X) shopkeepers refusing to accept Greek (Y) notes. Looking through my wallet the spanking new €50's are all Italian (S) :cool:

The 11 digit serial number on every note begins with a prefix showing which country issued it. German notes begin with an X, Greek notes start with a Y, Spain's have a V, France a U, Ireland T, Portugal M and Italy S. Belgium is Z, Cyprus G, Luxembourg I, Malta F, Netherlands P, Austria N, Slovenia H, Slovakia E and Finland L.

You can double check the issuer by adding the digits and adding again to arrive at a country code, eg: X50446027856.....(5+0+4+4+6+0+2+7+8+5+6) = 47, (4+7) = 11, (1+1) gives 2, the code number for Germany.

Nothing strange here. The U.S. uses a similar system. Each of the issuing Federal Reserve banks has an identifying letter which is printed on the currency they issue. The note in the link below was issued by the Federal reserve bank of San Francisco, as can be seen from the letter "L" in the crest on the left.





http://wendyusuallywanders.files.wordpress.com/2008/05/one_us_dollar.jpg

P.S. Most Americans in my experience are oblivious of this system.
 

ibis

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I believe some countries share a code.
Nope:

Belgium Z
Germany X
Ireland T
Greece Y
Spain V
France U
Italy S
Cyprus G
Luxembourg ( 1 )
Malta F
Netherlands P
Austria N
Portugal M
Slovenia H
Slovakia E
Finland L
 

Twin Towers

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Nope:

Belgium Z
Germany X
Ireland T
Greece Y
Spain V
France U
Italy S
Cyprus G
Luxembourg ( 1 )
Malta F
Netherlands P
Austria N
Portugal M
Slovenia H
Slovakia E
Finland L
The double check number code arrived at by cumulatively adding serial num digits. Germany is 2.
 

Passer-by

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Nothing strange here. The U.S. uses a similar system. Each of the issuing Federal Reserve banks has an identifying letter which is printed on the currency they issue. The note in the link below was issued by the Federal reserve bank of San Francisco, as can be seen from the letter "L" in the crest on the left.





http://wendyusuallywanders.files.wordpress.com/2008/05/one_us_dollar.jpg

P.S. Most Americans in my experience are oblivious of this system.
I guess this must mean the US has planned ahead for the break-up of the US dollar?

After all, didn't the Daily Telegraph have a report that shop-keepers in some US States were refusing to accept dollars printed in other US States? :lol:
 

paulp

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I guess this must mean the US has planned ahead for the break-up of the US dollar?

After all, didn't the Daily Telegraph have a report that shop-keepers in some US States were refusing to accept dollars printed in other US States? :lol:
They were stores in Tennessee that would only accept Confederate dollars.
 

Twin Towers

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Nothing strange here. The U.S. uses a similar system. Each of the issuing Federal Reserve banks has an identifying letter which is printed on the currency they issue.


There is a big difference between that and nation states though and there is no likelihood of the US suddenly cutting regions adrift.

A lot of people seem to be noticing that €50 notes being dispensed lately by the Post Office are not Irish issued.
 
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Twin Towers

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A lot of people seem to be noticing that €50 notes being dispensed lately by the Post Office are not Irish (T) issued ;)
 

Sync

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Having multiple voices shouting things in your head doesn't constitute "Lots of people" TT.
 

sondagefaux

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Nope:

Belgium Z
Germany X
Ireland T
Greece Y
Spain V
France U
Italy S
Cyprus G
Luxembourg ( 1 )
Malta F
Netherlands P
Austria N
Portugal M
Slovenia H
Slovakia E
Finland L
If you assign number values to each letter (based on Z = 26), and add the Luxembourg 1, you get 214.

Multiply 214 by 27 (the number of current EU members) and you get 5778.

Divide 5778 by 9 (the number of EEC members after Ireland, UK and Denmark joined) and you get 642.

Add 24 (the number of current EU member states that are obliged to eventually adopt the euro) and you get 666!!!!! :eek::eek::eek::eek:

Beware! The time of the beast is at hand!

Get rid of your euro notes now lest ye be consumed in the flames!

PM me and I will take all your diabolical euro notes, free of charge.

I am a sinner beyond redemption so I'm willing to make this sacrifice.
 


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