EU's negotiating strategy re Brexit. 'Chapeau'

benroe

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To do that, we'd be somewhat dependent on the UK. If history has failed to teach us anything in regard to what to expect from there, the farce that is going on right now must surely make us worry, if we ever have to depend on them for anything, for even a second.
The trouble is the UK were the biggest single contributor to our bailout, we already owe them ,bigtime.
 


shiel

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The trouble is the UK were the biggest single contributor to our bailout, we already owe them ,bigtime.
That is not true.

The following is a statement of where the 85 bn bailout came from.

The external support will be broken down as follows: €22½ billion from the European Financial Stability Mechanism (EFSM); €22½ billion from the International Monetary Fund (IMF); and €22½ billion from the European Financial Stability Fund (EFSF) and bilateral loans.

The bilateral loans will be subject to the same conditionality as provided by the programme.

Of the twenty two and a half bn bilateral loans three came from the UK.
 

benroe

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That is not true.

The following is a statement of where the 85 bn bailout came from.

The external support will be broken down as follows: €22½ billion from the European Financial Stability Mechanism (EFSM); €22½ billion from the International Monetary Fund (IMF); and €22½ billion from the European Financial Stability Fund (EFSF) and bilateral loans.

The bilateral loans will be subject to the same conditionality as provided by the programme.

Of the twenty two and a half bn bilateral loans three came from the UK.
The Bilateral loans were the only loans that were given by single nations and the UK were by far the largest, so my statement is correct.
 

Vega1447

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The Bilateral loans were the only loans that were given by single nations and the UK were by far the largest, so my statement is correct.
You said
The trouble is the UK were the biggest single contributor to our bailout, we already owe them ,bigtime.
So we owe them 3B€. Not a big deal in the overall scheme of things. We could simply pay them back immediately if it was necessary.

Why do you believe otherwise?
 

firefly123

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If the WWII was the UK's War of Independence, the Brexit talks are it's experience of a Treaty negotiation.

I think there's quite a parallel- not least in the complete novelty of the experience for the UK negotiators, the EU's attitude of [injured] lese-majeste, coupled with close and unexpected attention to detail; ( the Irish border, and that 'closing your account payment') , while making out-flanking extensions of it's own influence ( recent ' free' trade treaty with Japan) among the potential targets for future British trade partners.
Who do those arrogant EU apparatchiks Juncker and Barnier think they are?

There's also the [apparent] outsourcing of the face to face negotiations ( supposedly between sovereign States) to a civil servant of the EU, (whose chief contribution has been contumely observations to the media on the quality of the British preparation), and the ultimate delegation of any actual agreement to the veto of the EU parliament ( the EU's most personally indebted and grateful institution, if a bit untried in this role).

Unreproved the EU has asserted that it decides the timetable, the sequence of issues, and formed the novel 'pay to talk' concept.

It's been quite a display, if a bit uncomfortable at times for those raised on the principle, 'Britannia waives the Rules'- Bravo!, and on occasions, Ole!
Wouldn't it be a very tidy conclusion if the UK's 'treaty' talks result in the reunification of Ireland.
 

firefly123

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You can't really bully a nation with Nuclear Weapons.
Jaysus. That's a leap.
EU: We won't allow you free trade access like before.

UK : Well we will irradiated Paris so!


Do you realise how nuts you sound?
 

firefly123

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You said


So we owe them 3B€. Not a big deal in the overall scheme of things. We could simply pay them back immediately if it was necessary.

Why do you believe otherwise?
I'm pretty sure we already paid the UK back
 

shiel

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The Bilateral loans were the only loans that were given by single nations and the UK were by far the largest, so my statement is correct.
We will not get into a fuss about it.

There are bigger issues in brexit than this.

But the point I was making is that 3bn of the total 85bn bailout when Ireland was bankrupted by its own most powerful citizens in 2010 was bilateral from the UK.

Whatever it was it has to be appreciated.

But brexit is a much more serious declaration of economic war on this country by the UK.
 
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raetsel

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Brexit is a financial crisis, the UKs citizens purchasing power is taking another knock although after years of devaluations the UK public are inured to this creeping impoverishment.

The UK public are literally being fleeced by their own government.
I can second that, based upon very painful, first hand personal experience. If the pound falls much further holidays abroad will become almost prohibitively expensive. I took a trip into the Republic last week along with my missus, and apart from filling up my car with diesel and buying a couple of sirloin steaks, which are still cheaper south of the border, the only money we spent was on two cups of coffee. Everything else we could buy more cheaply in the north. I used to take short breaks in Dublin regularly. That won't be happening for some time to come. I'd imagine that the cumulative effect of that will take its toll on the tourist economy in the Republic as well, considering the number of people in the north who do the same thing - and that is before you consider the much bigger market in Britain. Brexit is a disaster for both sides of the border. The only people who support seem to be mindless fools with a blind hatred of the EU. And in Ireland those people didn't exist until the financial crisis, which was self created by stupidity and short sighted greed.
 

Mitsui2

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... in Ireland those people didn't exist until the financial crisis, which was self created by stupidity and short sighted greed.
To be fair they did exist, but they were pretty few in number and in most cases their antipathy was widely regarded as being based on one or another type of nuttiness.
 

brughahaha

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What decision does the EU have to make?

It's the UK that's decided to leave.
And there in a nutshell , you have the innate stupidity of the average EU fanboy :roll:
 

Tribal

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To be fair they did exist, but they were pretty few in number and in most cases their antipathy was widely regarded as being based on one or another type of nuttiness.
Indeed, in recent time Sein Fein have shifted from anti-EU to pro-EU. Only PBP/AAA are the Anti-EU brigade but they seem to oppose everything.
 

raetsel

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Indeed, in recent time Sein Fein have shifted from anti-EU to pro-EU. Only PBP/AAA are the Anti-EU brigade but they seem to oppose everything.
Sinn Fein's policy came from a time when they were out on a limb. Now that they are trying to steal Fianna Fail's clothes, they have to project an image of common sense. Nobody in Ireland in their right mind would vote for a party with a policy of taking the country out of the EU except for extremists on the far left and far right, and while clinically sane, those people are closer to nutters than the rest of us. Why would anyone want to make exporting arrangements to half of your existing market much more difficult? Ireland belongs to the best free trade cartel in the world and has done very well out of it over the last 44 years.
 

HarshBuzz

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We will not get into a fuss about it.

There are bigger issues in brexit than this.

But the point I was making is that 3bn of the total 85bn bailout when Ireland was bankrupted by its own most powerful citizens in 2010 was bilateral from the UK.

Whatever it was it has to be appreciated.

But brexit is a much more serious declaration of economic war on this country by the UK.
Ah shiel, would you get over yourself for God's sake.

Brexit had nothing to do with Ireland, except in your fevered imagination. Stop cutting and pasting the same post 5,000 times and think for a change.
 

Tribal

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HarshBuzz

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You're underestimating the political repercussions in the future.
I am simply stating that the motivations for Brexit did not include a desire to do Ireland ill - as shiel is so tediously repeating.

The effects are a different matter and may well be played out over decades. Possibly including the big one - reunification.
 

Tribal

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I am simply stating that the motivations for Brexit did not include a desire to do Ireland ill - as shiel is so tediously repeating.
One thing I'm certain of is Britain's involvement with us was never for our benefit.
 


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