Extending Brexit talks is vital for Northern Ireland

McSlaggart

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To the cogent reasons for delaying the final conclusion to the Brexit negotiations (“The UK must extend its EU transitional period”, FT View, May 21) should be added the unsatisfactory position failure to take such a step would present for Northern Ireland. The problems of its border with the Republic of Ireland, and hence the EU, have barely been addressed so far. The uneasy fudge that is being contrived would be highly dangerous, offering as it does opportunities for a return to endless armed clashes along the frontier that were a regular feature before the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. I witnessed these at first hand. Leaving Northern Ireland in limbo and the consequential risks of reviving conflict are far too great a danger. Firmer policies must be developed.

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What is interesting in this piece is an absence of any analysis of unionism position in the out workings of Brexit. After Brexit Northern Ireland will not be in limbo. It will be tied to the EU and become an economic part of a single Island. Unionism is in a strange position in that it supported Brexit even though many knew this clearly stated this was the most logical outcome.

What would the point of extending the EU talks as unionism does not even have a working alternative to the current compromise.
 


blinding

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I expect to see the 50%+1 for a United Ireland at the Northern Ireland Secretary’s door every day. It should be a doddle ! ! !
 

devonish

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To the cogent reasons for delaying the final conclusion to the Brexit negotiations (“The UK must extend its EU transitional period”, FT View, May 21) should be added the unsatisfactory position failure to take such a step would present for Northern Ireland. The problems of its border with the Republic of Ireland, and hence the EU, have barely been addressed so far. The uneasy fudge that is being contrived would be highly dangerous, offering as it does opportunities for a return to endless armed clashes along the frontier that were a regular feature before the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. I witnessed these at first hand. Leaving Northern Ireland in limbo and the consequential risks of reviving conflict are far too great a danger. Firmer policies must be developed.

Subscribe to read | Financial Times


What is interesting in this piece is an absence of any analysis of unionism position in the out workings of Brexit. After Brexit Northern Ireland will not be in limbo. It will be tied to the EU and become an economic part of a single Island. Unionism is in a strange position in that it supported Brexit even though many knew this clearly stated this was the most logical outcome.

What would the point of extending the EU talks as unionism does not even have a working alternative to the current compromise.
Simplistic view of what is intended (if it ever comes about). NI will have a foot in both camps, trade without tariffs with both the EU and the rest of the UK, the issue is, to what extent there are checks on produce coming into NI from GB or produce leaving NI for GB.
 

shiel

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To the cogent reasons for delaying the final conclusion to the Brexit negotiations (“The UK must extend its EU transitional period”, FT View, May 21) should be added the unsatisfactory position failure to take such a step would present for Northern Ireland. The problems of its border with the Republic of Ireland, and hence the EU, have barely been addressed so far. The uneasy fudge that is being contrived would be highly dangerous, offering as it does opportunities for a return to endless armed clashes along the frontier that were a regular feature before the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. I witnessed these at first hand. Leaving Northern Ireland in limbo and the consequential risks of reviving conflict are far too great a danger. Firmer policies must be developed.

Subscribe to read | Financial Times


What is interesting in this piece is an absence of any analysis of unionism position in the out workings of Brexit. After Brexit Northern Ireland will not be in limbo. It will be tied to the EU and become an economic part of a single Island. Unionism is in a strange position in that it supported Brexit even though many knew this clearly stated this was the most logical outcome.

What would the point of extending the EU talks as unionism does not even have a working alternative to the current compromise.
Brexit is a disaster.

It is a declaration of economic war on the rest of Europe.

It has torn up the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement which drew a line under centuries of colonial rule.

It is the first move in the dismantling of the EU.

The consequences of Brexit will be long term and to put it mildly not good.
 

brigg

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Brexit is a disaster.

It is a declaration of economic war on the rest of Europe.
I read this much and correctly guessed it must be Shiel! Your hyperbole about the UK has become easily recognisable.
I suppose we need a EU army to invade and subjugate them, as they did to us.
That'll learn them!
 

devonish

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I read this much and correctly guessed it must be Shiel! Your hyperbole about the UK has become easily recognisable.
I suppose we need a EU army to invade and subjugate them, as they did to us.
That'll learn them!
I have to laugh every time he mentions "declaration of economic war" given that in economic terms the EU27 is 5 times the size of the UK.
 

McSlaggart

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Simplistic view of what is intended (if it ever comes about). NI will have a foot in both camps, trade without tariffs with both the EU and the rest of the UK, the issue is, to what extent there are checks on produce coming into NI from GB or produce leaving NI for GB.

I honestly do not think the uk will actually allow a region having such a economic advantage. It is already clear that they do not have any clear plan as to what they are doing.
 

shiel

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I read this much and correctly guessed it must be Shiel! Your hyperbole about the UK has become easily recognisable.
I suppose we need a EU army to invade and subjugate them, as they did to us.
That'll learn them!
Look I hope I am wrong.

But the discourse on the issue would be better if people did not just ignore the possibility that Brexit could have very serious consequences not just in Ireland but in the UK and the EU.
 

shiel

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I have to laugh every time he mentions "declaration of economic war" given that in economic terms the EU27 is 5 times the size of the UK.
The UK is a nuclear power, a permanent member of the UN security council and one of the biggest economies in the world.

Do not under-estimate its power in the Brexit negotiations.
 

devonish

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I honestly do not think the uk will actually allow a region having such a economic advantage. It is already clear that they do not have any clear plan as to what they are doing.
It's what they have signed up to, any objections which were raised on the economic advantage were from the EU side, France being the first country to come to mind, not the UK.
 

McSlaggart

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The UK is a nuclear power, a permanent member of the UN security council and one of the biggest economies in the world.

Do not under-estimate its power in the Brexit negotiations.

The fact that the uk is in the un will make no difference. The uk economy is small compared to the EU. The uk is heavily reliant on the financial sector for its wealth. This is a major weakness in negotiation with the eu.
 

devonish

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The UK is a nuclear power, a permanent member of the UN security council and one of the biggest economies in the world.

Do not under-estimate its power in the Brexit negotiations.
Oh ffs, are you now suggesting that the Brits will threaten to nuke Brussels?, France same status as UK re your first two points and you're ignoring the fact that the EU economy is five times that of the UK. The reality is that the UK is in a crap negotiating position which has resulted in the turmoil which has been on display over the last 3 to 4 years.
 

McSlaggart

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It's what they have signed up to, any objections which were raised on the economic advantage were from the EU side, France being the first country to come to mind, not the UK.
Northern Ireland will increasingly become part of the EU. This is simply not making the same mistake as the rest of the uk. It will be interesting how the rest of the uk react to the change. The truth is Northern Ireland is not in a position to stop the uk makes in how it treats northern Ireland.
 

devonish

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Northern Ireland will increasingly become part of the EU. This is simply not making the same mistake as the rest of the uk. It will be interesting how the rest of the uk react to the change. The truth is Northern Ireland is not in a position to stop the uk makes in how it treats northern Ireland.
Can you give some examples, currency? taxation? financial regulation? representation? financial contribution?
 

McSlaggart

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Can you give some examples, currency? taxation? financial regulation? representation? financial contribution?

The northern Ireland economy is integrated with the rest of the Island. Agrifood sector and engineering are often fully integrated. Any major divergence in the area of " currency? taxation? financial regulation" could have a major impact on employment and the industrial base of the economy. The EU has pumped lots of money into parts of northern Ireland such as Derry which for some reason was left out of major inward investment.

As for representation well I cannot vote for a Donegal TD that does not stop me going to one to get issues addressed.
 

shiel

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Oh ffs, are you now suggesting that the Brits will threaten to nuke Brussels?, France same status as UK re your first two points and you're ignoring the fact that the EU economy is five times that of the UK. The reality is that the UK is in a crap negotiating position which has resulted in the turmoil which has been on display over the last 3 to 4 years.
Just because their negotiating position is not great does not mean that they cannot cause major problems with a no deal Brexit and a messy border situation in Ireland.
 

McTell

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NI should aim to get the best from both eu and uk. They have the brainpower to do it.

But relying endlessly on handouts from the world outside the 6 counties is not a real future, as it relies on politicians buying votes.
 

McTell

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Here's an example of where they go wrong.....


NI facing 'very severe' recession, warns Murphy

"There are very real challenges ahead. The Executive, when it reformed in January, was going to face a very challenging time politically, economically, in terms of support for public services because of the years of austerity budgets, but that's all been greatly increased because of the situation we are facing at the moment."

Mr Murphy said he is "bringing a process" to the Assembly today to approve additional funding for some departments, after four/five departments "spent more than we can them cover for".


He should have said, "come to NI where many of our assets are very soon going to be at an attractive and realistic price for new investors. We look forward to you joining our team."
 

Dame_Enda

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Reports this morning that some NI govt depts running out of money.

Shows the folly of Brexit for NI. If it was in a United Ireland in the Eurozone it could benefit from bailouts and bond markets. Ireland sold bonds at negative interest rates in recent weeks. Raised €6bn in one bond auction. Thats most of the UK subsidy.
 

blinding

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Reports this morning that some NI govt depts running out of money.

Shows the folly of Brexit for NI. If it was in a United Ireland in the Eurozone it could benefit from bailouts and bond markets. Ireland sold bonds at negative interest rates in recent weeks. Raised €6bn in one bond auction. Thats most of the UK subsidy.
The sooner Northern Ireland leaves the Uk the better for everyone !
 


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