Farmer finds book while spreading cow manure ---- ULYSSES--- for mugs.

valamhic

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I rented 8 acres after the owner died. A big load of cow dung has built up behind the cowshed. Great rank dung. I needed to spread it on the big field behind the hill. It has to be partly done by hand, with a grape (4 pronged fork). Due to inaccessibility. The days are short this time of year, but strangely enough the nights are long. I found a copy of a big book with fine print under the leg of a table in the the old vacant house on the plot of land I rented. The name is "ULYSSES" by a lad called James Joyce.

Some said it's a famous book, I never heard about it in the Farmer's Journal. Dessie Quarrellsome says it's a hard read and I suspect at last we found something to agree on. I have to admit, I have already read the first 2 episodes and am just starting Episode 3. I thought I would waddle through the first few pages and throw it there. Maybe I still will.

Now, I know (from seeing TV programmes) a bit about it. You will know Joyce uses Homer's Oddesy as its base and that there was a film on RTE a few years ago about Homer's work. That was before the Greens got their hands on the Broadcaster and ruined it. I already posted a bit on the Stingjack thread.

I hope I'm not labelled arty farty. I am banned from the Trump gets caught, the Immediate repercussions of President Donald Trump and the Politics.ie is unsustainable. Thread. That's life, I think I will soon be banned completely, I think Ulysses will be more than Administration can take. I might as well go out with a bang.

Does anyone know anything about Ulysses? or Joyce? With the permission of all my readers, I will update as I go along.
 
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Lumpy Talbot

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No
Heard he worked for a bit behind the bar in a pub in Dalkey.
 

valamhic

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The Martello Tower was rented out as an apartment. Stephen Dedalus is a young teacher sharing with Buck Mulligan and an English recent called Hains. Dedalus is a self portrait of Joyce himself. Mulligan is that rascal Gogerty, whom Joyce had met and decided that he had to give Gogerty a look in at the start. After shaving and a drop o' tay the trio head of on a dry morning. It's June the 16th 1904 south county Dublin before the Greens grabbed the territory. They chat and Dedalus lays out his stall. He is a carbon copy of you and me.

Loaded from birth with the Catholic Religion until he can't take it any more, he rebels and rebelling is not easy for Stephen and was not easy for me. He refused to kneel at his mother;s funeral. When my mother died, I (in keeping with her wishes) went to confession, the priest got up from the confessional chair and laughed at me. He didn't believe it either. Stephen heads to the school where the headmaster pays him a few bob and reveals his anti Semitic typicalyl Irish sentiment. "We have no Jewish Problem in Ireland because we never let them in" says he.
 

valamhic

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Hains is planted to review the question, would Ireland have been better or worse without Britain's invasions and land robbery? Did Britain give Ireland something in return for steeling our land? Three never to be answered questions presented to readers as the sun rises, the British and the Church and the Jews.

Somewhere else Mollie Bloom is served tay in bed by hen pecked Jewish Husband Leopold. She is the boss but not too bad. Is she Jewish too? I reckon she is, she can't be Irish, Irish women are donkeys, greedy bullies. Mollie is not too bad, she is Jewish, an Irish woman would not marry a Jew, especially one will little Money. Note there is no servant around that morning.

Leopold heads out to a funeral, a young person and (Joyce is a rascal) Bloom has a son who died, and Bloom silently laments it. I'm warming to Leopold Bloom already. Sad in a way. I have children (sons too), lucky, fulfilling too. Joyce is pulling me in, like pulling away stones to find whats under them.
 
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valamhic

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Heard he worked for a bit behind the bar in a pub in Dalkey.
Probably, I don't know much about him. All the better so I can read it fresh.


History is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake and God is a shout in the street
 
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StarryPlough01

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James Joyce Tower and Museum, Sandycove County Dublin


Opening Hours

Open 10am to 6pm.

The James Joyce Tower is open every day of the year.

The tower itself is a great example of the Martello towers built, by the British, in Ireland in the early 19th century to defend against a threatened Napoleonic invasion.

It is also the setting in which the opening of James Joyce’s masterpiece ‘Ulysses’ is set and houses the James Joyce Museum which boasts a unique and wonderful collection of Joycean memorabilia.


Finnegans Wake Readings each Wednesday | James Joyce Tower and Museum


Finnegans Wake Readings each Wednesday


When: November 22, 2017 @ 11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Where: Fitzgerald's Pub, Sandycove, Dublin, Ireland


https://archive.org/details/Ulysses-Audiobook


Ulysses contains approximately 265,000 words from a lexicon of 30,030 words (including proper names, plurals and various verb tenses), divided into eighteen episodes. Since publication, the book attracted controversy and scrutiny, ranging from early obscenity trials to protracted textual "Joyce Wars." Ulysses' stream-of-consciousness technique, careful structuring, and experimental prose—full of puns, parodies, and allusions, as well as its rich characterisations and broad humour, made the book a highly regarded novel in the Modernist pantheon. In 1999, the Modern Library ranked Ulysses first on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.
 

statsman

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It is, in my view, the greatest novel in the English language. Pearls before swine, I'd say.
 

12 bens

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I rented 8 acres after the owner died. A big load of cow dung has built up behind the cowshed. Great rank dung. I needed to spread it on the big field behind the hill. It has to be partly done by hand, with a grape (4 pronged fork). Due to inaccessibility. The days are short this time of year, but strangely enough the nights are long. I found a copy of a big book with fine print under the leg of a table in the the old vacant house on the plot of land I rented. The name is "ULYSSES" by a lad called James Joyce.

Some said it's a famous book, I never heard about it in the Farmer's Journal. Dessie Quarrellsome says it's a hard read and I suspect at last we found something to agree on. I have to admit, I have already read the first 2 episodes and am just starting Episode 3. I thought I would waddle through the first few pages and throw it there. Maybe I still will.

Now, I know (from seeing TV programmes) a bit about it. You will know Joyce uses Homer's Oddesy as its base and that there was a film on RTE a few years ago about Homer's work. That was before the Greens got their hands on the Broadcaster and ruined it. I already posted a bit on the Stingjack thread.

I hope I'm not labelled arty farty. I am banned from the Trump gets caught, the Immediate repercussions of President Donald Trump and the Politics.ie is unsustainable. Thread. That's life, I think I will soon be banned completely, I think Ulysses will be more than Administration can take. I might as well go out with a bang.

Does anyone know anything about Ulysses? or Joyce? With the permission of all my readers, I will update as I go along.
Well done Val a mhic!


'Twas a good idea to import your posts from the Stringvest thread as it will be a unique record of your 'virgin' reading of Ulysses. I brought your endeavours to the attention of two well-known Joyce scholars and they will be following your journey with interest.


The process by how one first encounters the text of Ulysses has been a hot topic in the Joyce industry for some years. Check out Virgin and Veteran Readings of Ulysses by Margot Norris.Virgin and Veteran Readings of Ulysses | M. Norris | Palgrave Macmillan


Your friend Leopold Bloom has you in mind in the Circe episode 'Three acres and a cow for all children of nature.' (Apologies for the spoiler!)
 

Levellers

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I rented 8 acres after the owner died. A big load of cow dung has built up behind the cowshed. Great rank dung. I needed to spread it on the big field behind the hill. It has to be partly done by hand, with a grape (4 pronged fork). Due to inaccessibility. The days are short this time of year, but strangely enough the nights are long. I found a copy of a big book with fine print under the leg of a table in the the old vacant house on the plot of land I rented. The name is "ULYSSES" by a lad called James Joyce.

Some said it's a famous book, I never heard about it in the Farmer's Journal. Dessie Quarrellsome says it's a hard read and I suspect at last we found something to agree on. I have to admit, I have already read the first 2 episodes and am just starting Episode 3. I thought I would waddle through the first few pages and throw it there. Maybe I still will.

Now, I know (from seeing TV programmes) a bit about it. You will know Joyce uses Homer's Oddesy as its base and that there was a film on RTE a few years ago about Homer's work. That was before the Greens got their hands on the Broadcaster and ruined it. I already posted a bit on the Stingjack thread.

I hope I'm not labelled arty farty. I am banned from the Trump gets caught, the Immediate repercussions of President Donald Trump and the Politics.ie is unsustainable. Thread. That's life, I think I will soon be banned completely, I think Ulysses will be more than Administration can take. I might as well go out with a bang.

Does anyone know anything about Ulysses? or Joyce? With the permission of all my readers, I will update as I go along.
When did you start using the word dung?
 

12 bens

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What a blog. Kudos.
As you know, Val a mhic is down on the farm so no Ulysses reading today.

In the meantime, if you are unfamiliar with Joyce's humour check this out.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e6qRLTKBxjg

It's Stephen Rea reading from the Cyclops episode (at 45.00. mins) which takes place in Barney Kiernan's pub in Little Britain Street, off Capel Street in Dublin on 16 June 1904.

If you don't find this a hoot you may well be beyond help!
 

Civic_critic2

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The tower itself is a great example of the Martello towers built, by the British, in Ireland in the early 19th century to defend against a threatened Napoleonic invasion.
There it is again, the word defend. It defended nothing but British interests and was a watchtower on the edge of our prison preventing liberation by friends from abroad. It was built just 6 years after 50,000 died in only 3 weeks in a rising against the British.

You'll see this word defend everywhere these towers are written about by the historically ignorant, propagandised, stockholm syndrome Irish. Or the south county Dublin post-colonial pro-British árselickers.

Carry on.
 

12 bens

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There it is again, the word defend. It defended nothing but British interests and was a watchtower on the edge of our prison preventing liberation by friends from abroad. It was built just 6 years after 50,000 died in only 3 weeks in a rising against the British.

You'll see this word defend everywhere these towers are written about by the historically ignorant, propagandised, stockholm syndrome Irish. Or the south county Dublin post-colonial pro-British árselickers.

Carry on.
Correct!

In 'After the Race' Joyce refers to the Irish as the 'gratefully oppressed' but their sympathy was with their friends-the French.

I see that you too are a Joycean.
 

valamhic

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Its hard to follow, but I read it that Stephen is gone for a walk on the strand. I am confused if its him or Bloom, but I think its Stephen. The dog is sniffing around. I take that to refer to the dog looking for information, news from sent. Everyone is out to hear the gossip and so is the dog, Stephen is looking for more than news, he is searching for a more basic answer (meaning of life perhaps). Then the dog pisses, then Stephen pisses.

Next there is a couple courting in the grass near the beach. Is it Stephen of Bloom sees this. Bloom is a day dreamer, and its not just floral arrangements he is thinking of. He is a Walter Mitty type. Joyce is using imagery and I still think he suffers from synesstesia. He sees everything in colour. A fella called Duignam has died and of course there is a funeral.
 

valamhic

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There it is again, the word defend. It defended nothing but British interests and was a watchtower on the edge of our prison preventing liberation by friends from abroad. It was built just 6 years after 50,000 died in only 3 weeks in a rising against the British.

You'll see this word defend everywhere these towers are written about by the historically ignorant, propagandised, stockholm syndrome Irish. Or the south county Dublin post-colonial pro-British árselickers.

Carry on.
I went to Iceland last year and you can sense the absence of invasion. Mind you there is no land or anything except fish. I wonder wjhy the British did not take it all
 
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Interesting idea for a thread
 

The Field Marshal

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It is, in my view, the greatest novel in the English language. Pearls before swine, I'd say.
It is in my view the most over rated novel in the English language.
A swine of a book , written for swine.
 


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