Farmers continue protests despite deal reached with minister and meat processors at the weekend

Myler

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Couldn't see a thread on this - apologies if I missed it.

Brexit is highlighting the weaknesses in our food supply chain. Beef production, which is largely for export to the UK, doesn't help this and is a major component in our climate emissions.

That bigger picture doesn't seem to feature in this dispute. If farmers were to leave the beef industry, and grow other products that possibly serve the domestic consumer, that would be a better outcome than clinging on to producing a product for a soon-to-vanish UK market.

I can't understand the narrow focus of this dispute, and why we're not just letting it suggest to farmers what they need to do.
 


Patslatt1

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Couldn't see a thread on this - apologies if I missed it.

Brexit is highlighting the weaknesses in our food supply chain. Beef production, which is largely for export to the UK, doesn't help this and is a major component in our climate emissions.

That bigger picture doesn't seem to feature in this dispute. If farmers were to leave the beef industry, and grow other products that possibly serve the domestic consumer, that would be a better outcome than clinging on to producing a product for a soon-to-vanish UK market.

I can't understand the narrow focus of this dispute, and why we're not just letting it suggest to farmers what they need to do.
BUSINESS PEOPLE
Farmers need to realise they are BUSINESS people subject to cyclical market forces. A shift to milk production from dry beef cattle is the obvious solution given the vast demand for milk products growing in Asia.
 

Round tower

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It's a complicated situation, prices for what the farmers get a reduced a lot but has the price the consumers are paying for their meat, thwy are being hit while the processors and the retailers are not being hit. Their is also a problems on the regulation that beef must be under 30 months.
 

Myler

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It's a complicated situation, prices for what the farmers get a reduced a lot but has the price the consumers are paying for their meat, thwy are being hit while the processors and the retailers are not being hit. Their is also a problems on the regulation that beef must be under 30 months.
But isn't there a bigger picture? None of that amounts to a hill of beans, if there are strategic reasons for farmers to get out of beef production and into other products.

It all seems quite incoherent - its actually layers of incoherence, rather than layers of complexity. Just to take one aspect, I can't understand why anyone would engage in negotiations with "representatives" who explicitly say they've no capacity to influence protesters, and who aren't willing to endorse the outcome of the talks they've participated in.

Is this how the farming sector finally hits a rock and sinks under the weight of their own incoherence?
 

amsterdemmetje

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I loved the placards at one of the sites "no handouts just fair trade" when two thirds of Irish farmers receive EU subsidies.
 

Round tower

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But isn't there a bigger picture? None of that amounts to a hill of beans, if there are strategic reasons for farmers to get out of beef production and into other products.

It all seems quite incoherent - its actually layers of incoherence, rather than layers of complexity. Just to take one aspect, I can't understand why anyone would engage in negotiations with "representatives" who explicitly say they've no capacity to influence protesters, and who aren't willing to endorse the outcome of the talks they've participated in.

Is this how the farming sector finally hits a rock and sinks under the weight of their own incoherence?
The thing is that the largest amount of farmers in Ire. would be suckling farmers, part time farmers would have 15 t0 20 suckling cows, at 6 to 8 months they would bring them to the mart and sell the calves off the cows. If the beef farmers don't get a proper price for their animals and pull out of beef it will affect thousands of suckler farmers.
 

Myler

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If the beef farmers don't get a proper price for their animals and pull out of beef it will affect thousands of suckler farmers.
This still has next to nothing to do with the problem. If Brexit means the UK market is closed, beef farmers won't be getting any price for their animals.

Its as if farmers aren't keeping up with current events
It seems impressive when you see statements like
The agri-food sector generated just over €13 billion in exports last year, around 10% of the country's overall merchandise exports.
But then you realise
The agri-food sector accounted for 11.3% of total imports in 2017. .... Agri-food imports totalled €8.7 billion in 2017, an increase of 6% on 2016 according to the CSO.
So our food imports, by value, are almost as high as our exports.

A lot of problems in the sector seem to be coming to a head. This dispute over beef prices seems to be real head-in-the-sand stuff.
 

Levellers

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The farmers and meat processors have been told for years to diversify from the handy British market. They didn't listen.
 

Round tower

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The farmers and meat processors have been told for years to diversify from the handy British market. They didn't listen.
The Irish continue searching in othher markets, during the dispute their was a group of chinese inspecters checking plants to see could they get meat from them plants, it did not help when they were stopped entring due the dispute.


One of the main complaints of farmers is the question how much each sector gets out of 10 euros a commsumer spends on beef, farmers say they get 2 euros, the meat processors ay it's 63%, the other sector which was not involved in the dispute is the retailers, i would think the figure is some where in between
 

McTell

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No
You can pay more in euro-per-kg for crisps than for steak.

China will be the saving of us, so it will.
 

Round tower

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20% for raw materials is a very healthy return
The raw materials for the beef industry is the suck calf, the beef farmer that put's in the work for up to 2 years, feed them by providing grass for the summer and winter forage and meals for the winter. The meat processers gets the finished animal and pay around 3.50 a kilo, how long would a animal be in the meat factory?
 

Round tower

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The Irish continue searching in othher markets, during the dispute their was a group of chinese inspecters checking plants to see could they get meat from them plants, it did not help when they were stopped entring due the dispute.


One of the main complaints of farmers is the question how much each sector gets out of 10 euros a commsumer spends on beef, farmers say they get 2 euros, the meat processors ay it's 63%, the other sector which was not involved in the dispute is the retailers, i would think the figure is some where in between
This is what farmers claim what each sector gets from the €10 consumers spend on beef.

Retailers gets €5.10 for 3 days work
Processor gets €2.90 for 3 days work
Farmers gets €2.00 for 2 years work
 

LISTOWEL MAN

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That is Gerard from the Ballyhaunis protest, did not see what did he do, himself and his 2 brothers would be involved in beef farming.
he called the beef industry a cartel then Claire Byrne panicked and said RTE don't stand with that
 

LISTOWEL MAN

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The farmers have been told for years

They didn't listen
Cavan farmer Michael Coyle and his protesters on RTE prime time last night

would i get into trouble for saying thy looked like travellers with their stares and their crackling fire in a barrel ?
 

Rural

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The raw materials for the beef industry is the suck calf, the beef farmer that put's in the work for up to 2 years, feed them by providing grass for the summer and winter forage and meals for the winter. The meat processers gets the finished animal and pay around 3.50 a kilo, how long would a animal be in the meat factory?
There's also the cost of a Veterinary which is usually call-out and doesn't come cheap.

The thing is, the parents of these farmers used to own the Co-Ops and they sold their shares very quickly to the meat/creamery barons just to build a conservatory or something equally stupid. They also have great accountants who can justify the farmer's children getting grants for college and every one of them gets to college. PAYE workers don't have that.
 

ottovonbismarck

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There is a massive fraud with the feedlots re VAT. I’m surprised it hasn’t been discussed here. The amount of corruption in the beef industry is massive.

When Simon Coveney was minister for ag, he effectively removed all competition re rendering. This gave full control of factories to Larry Goodman. Simon’s wife is a niece of Larry’s.


 

Rural

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There is a massive fraud with the feedlots re VAT. I’m surprised it hasn’t been discussed here. The amount of corruption in the beef industry is massive.

When Simon Coveney was minister for ag, he effectively removed all competition re rendering. This gave full control of factories to Larry Goodman. Simon’s wife is a niece of Larry’s.


Wowser! I never knew that at all.

The bauld Larry is now sourcing beef from Poland and processing it in NI. The farmers haven't a hope in this battle, not a chance.
 


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