Favourite Paintings

Green eyed monster

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Post an image (or more than one) of your favourite painting(s) explaining if you want why you admire it.

One of my favourites is...

Siege of La Rochelle



The Cardinal Ritchelou is imagined by 19th Century artist Henri Motte to be inspecting the siege camp during the important battle during the 30 years war.

Why i like it... his use of light is spectacular.

Amazing use of light affects a bright afternoon with mist in the air from the surf creating the impression of a combination of rain and sun. With the reflections on the large cobble stones particularly striking in reflecting the colours of the sky. Another reason would be detail...

up close... See the fine droplets of surf in the air.



The theme is also an impressive choice, Motte was obviously inspired strongly by his country's history... I don't know if there is any significance to Ritchelou standing some distance from the monks in the background, his political positions certainly put him at odds with Catholicism as he sided with Protestant fundamentalist nations against the Catholic Holy Roman Empire during the Thirty Years War. He cuts a magnificent solitary figure, gazing thoughtfully out across the water and is cast in the painting as much as a martial figure as a de facto head of state or a clergyman, with his sabre sticking out and his armour pads.
 


FakeViking

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I was utterly bowled over by the Carravagio in Malta's main cathedral. It's a stunning piece of work.


 

cry freedom

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A strange choice for an unbeliever perhaps but since I first saw it in the Louvre over 40 years ago it has remained etched in my brain.
The use of light is fantastic and the image of the Child Jesus' fingers being almost x-rayed by the candlelight is super realistic and magnificent.
As someone who often had the unthankfull job of trying to shine light for my father during a night time farm emergency I well know how he must have felt.

Sorry I don't know how to make the picture appear directly.
Please use link below.

image principale

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Gadfly

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Another painting with contemporary relevance ...
 

Luigi Vampa

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A strange choice for an unbeliever perhaps but since I first saw it in the Louvre over 40 years ago it has remained etched in my brain.
The use of light is fantastic and the image of the Child Jesus' fingers being almost x-rayed by the candlelight is super realistic and magnificent.
As someone who often had the unthankfull job of trying to shine light for my father during a night time farm emergency I well know how he must have felt.

 

Green eyed monster

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Another painting with contemporary relevance ...
Yes interesting work, full of action and with a strong political message.

Why is she naked though? Does it symbolise the partial rape of France's honour by the Ancien Regime with the victim now rising as an avenging heroine? Or maybe as though like an Amazon she has taken on the self body image of a male fighter and ignores her chest nudity. Or perhaps her bare breasts symbolise nurturing, the sovereign mother of the nation figure baring her breasts in preparation to feed the hungry of France.

Good painting Luigi (and the others too), it would look great to have that hanging in your hallway wouldn't it? It must look impressive in darkness, you could only make out the reflections from the candle, making it look like a real light.
 

MauriceColgan

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Great thread, Thranduil.



This print of a painting of the great Ludwig Beethoven is not in the same class as those above but it's special to me because it's a rarity. Beethoven scholar John Suchet has never seen it before, and so far other Beethoven authorities are at a loss too.

I like the theme of Beethoven being serenaded by a wood nymph playing a flute. The print has the inscription "Thus Did All Nature Whisper to the Master". It's a little impressionistic but nevertheless painted by an accomplished artist.

John Suchet thinks it's a nineteenth century picture but the finger pointing by Beethoven has everyone wondering!? The artist is Johannes de Tah....? (Cannot make out the last letters clearly)
This thread must go to facebook.
 

Dasayev

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Don't know a lot about art but I think this is fantastic. Ossian's Dream by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres

 

Panopticon

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Why is she naked though? Does it symbolise the partial rape of France's honour by the Ancien Regime with the victim now rising as an avenging heroine? Or maybe as though like an Amazon she has taken on the self body image of a male fighter and ignores her chest nudity.
The second option, I think. Also, bosom = milk = food for newborn = nourishing the new freedom, and all that.

Of course, it's also possible that it's designed to appeal to the casual viewer, like the covers of several magazines I can think of...

Here is one I saw in the NY MOMA:

 

Green eyed monster

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The Taking of Christ in the National Gallery is an impressive piece, great history behind it too.
Yeah, not least the Taking of the Taking of Christ (i am sure Martin Cahill had a little chuckle over the pun).

I am a huge fan of Dali, he is probably my favourite painter. All his works had a achingly profound dreamlike quality.. This one is inspired by an actual dream.



As a surrealist interested in the deeper layers of the mind he naturally mined actual dream imagery as a source of inspiration, an excellent thing for a surrealist artist to do because the dream state is a deeper and more profound state of the mind and shows truths through symbolism in bizarre and amazing ways... It was said that he used the practice of lucid dreaming so he could remember and explore this world more directly for his work. True to this path he once said that his father was Freud.

But he was also inspired by Einstein's bizarre new interpretation of reality when he produced his most famous work..

The Persistence of Memory, showing clocks melting like chocolate symbolising the distorting of time.

 
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former wesleyan

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William Crossing the Boyne sure to appear soon !
 

Congalltee

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The Taking of Christ in the National Gallery is an impressive piece, great history behind it too.
Wasn't the painting owned by a widow, who's husband was a soldier who was killed in a reprisal for his part in humiliating the leaders from the Rising of Easter 1916? It is a fantastic painting, radical in it's depiction of the arrest if a criminal and the use of light, particularly.
 

Gadfly

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Came across this arresting image a few weeks back. The artist, Charles Deas, was committed to an asylum at the tender age of 29 - but not before turning out an amazing body of work on the American west in the 1840s.

"Walking the chalk": a man tries to walk in a straight line after consuming huge quantities of booze. The young man on the right has placed a bet - and everyone in the place knows he is being tricked.

Yup, there is a contemporary relevance. Ever get the feeling that you are the patsy in a crooked game?
 

Cato

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