Favourite shoes and boots

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gerhard dengler

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Very good, that is some testimony to their durability. There does not seem to be any shoemakers here anymore apart from Dubarry and I am not at all sure they make their shoes here anymore instead sourcing from elsewhere.

I used to wear decent shoes when younger but got into useless fall apart "fashion" items....have copped on now and only buy what I believe will last....Loakes are the best available to me where I am and so far have yet to wear a pair out.....heels and soles yes :D Way cheaper footwear and way more comfortable....and I am a walker :)
The GW's I have I bought them in the early 1980's. They are an extremely durable shoe, with only the leather sole and heel needing replacing perhaps every 18 months or so.

In terms for value for money, they have repaid me 100 fold since. A couple of tips : one is to ensure that they are regularly polished and cleaned. When you get the soles/heels replaced on first use only do so in dry weather.

If I remember the price I paid for them, I think I paid £40.00 (Irish pounds) per pair for them. That's translates to €45.00 per pair.
30+ plus years later they're as good as new!
 


truthisfree

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The GW's I have I bought them in the early 1980's. They are an extremely durable shoe, with only the leather sole and heel needing replacing perhaps every 18 months or so.

In terms for value for money, they have repaid me 100 fold since. A couple of tips : one is to ensure that they are regularly polished and cleaned. When you get the soles/heels replaced on first use only do so in dry weather.

If I remember the price I paid for them, I think I paid £40.00 (Irish pounds) per pair for them. That's translates to €45.00 per pair.
30+ plus years later they're as good as new!
Well its nice to talk to someone who has gotten such good service from well made shoes, interesting point you make about replacing heels/soles in dry weather...have you noticed that shoe polish (good quality) has become more difficult to get? Am not convinced by creams at all.
 

gerhard dengler

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Well its nice to talk to someone who has gotten such good service from well made shoes, interesting point you make about replacing heels/soles in dry weather...have you noticed that shoe polish (good quality) has become more difficult to get? Am not convinced by creams at all.
Good quality shoe polish is difficult to come by.
I just bring my shoes to a cobbler at Dolphins Barn to get them "soled and heeled". He used sell a shoe wax polish by Kiwi. It was superb for polishing shoes. I treat my shoes with a product called Dubbin. I work the shoe surface thoroughly and then I apply Kiwi shoe polish. It works a treat and helps preserve the leather and it's appearance
 

truthisfree

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Good quality shoe polish is difficult to come by.
I just bring my shoes to a cobbler at Dolphins Barn to get them "soled and heeled". He used sell a shoe wax polish by Kiwi. It was superb for polishing shoes. I treat my shoes with a product called Dubbin. I work the shoe surface thoroughly and then I apply Kiwi shoe polish. It works a treat and helps preserve the leather and it's appearance
Yes Kiwi is the business....Punch not as good imo.....Dubbin and then polish...I thought Dubbin was only for matt finish shoes?
 

gerhard dengler

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Yes Kiwi is the business....Punch not as good imo.....Dubbin and then polish...I thought Dubbin was only for matt finish shoes?
Dubbin might well be. I use it to try to weather proof the leather on my shoes and given their age I think it has helped preserve them
all this time.
I'd recommend KIWI or ideally KIWI wax polish, if you can get it.

I'm a nerd when it comes to maintain stuff - from cars to shoes to restoring furniture. I get a real kick out of maintaining stuff.
Restoring stuff to it's former glory is another passion of mine!
 

Ellen Ripley

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These are my favourite shoes at the moment;



Lovely to look at but impossible to wear, Ratio!

Each to their own, but I dislike gladiator sandals; less-than-perfect legs looks like a piece of veiny brisket trussed up with string when they've been standing for a while. Exposed toes in tights is not a good look, and for formal wear I think bare legs look 'unfinished', so I prefer sling-backs, or shoes with ankle-straps and a mid-heel.

I have two pairs of Salvatore Ferragamo shoes, a pair of Bruno Magli formal courts, and Missoni knee boots-- chic, classic, comfortable and beautifully-made.
I wear brown suede ankle boots and Geox (and Timberland or Gabor furry boots in severe weather) for casual Winter wear, and sneakers, pumps and Chloe flat sandals in Summer.

I like understated suede shoes, but they're a bit impractical in our climate. (As most thin-soled Italian shoes also tend to be, tbh)

I treat suede with moisture-repellent spray before first wear, and use Kiwi Guardsman Gloss on black leather. (Bit difficult to find stockists lately--does anyone polish shoes any more?)

*Always dampen the brush slightly before polishing --the secret to really shiny shoes!*




 

truthisfree

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Dubbin might well be. I use it to try to weather proof the leather on my shoes and given their age I think it has helped preserve them
all this time.
I'd recommend KIWI or ideally KIWI wax polish, if you can get it.

I'm a nerd when it comes to maintain stuff - from cars to shoes to restoring furniture. I get a real kick out of maintaining stuff.
Restoring stuff to it's former glory is another passion of mine!
Agree 100%, I detest this "disposable" consumer society we have foisted on us by greedy manufacturers designing built in redundancy......having said that good old fashioned quality goods can still be found with a little research.
 

truthisfree

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Lovely to look at but impossible to wear, Ratio!

Each to their own, but I dislike gladiator sandals; less-than-perfect legs looks like a piece of veiny brisket trussed up with string when they've been standing for a while. Exposed toes in tights is not a good look, and for formal wear I think bare legs look 'unfinished', so I prefer sling-backs, or shoes with ankle-straps and a mid-heel.

I have two pairs of Salvatore Ferragamo shoes, a pair of Bruno Magli formal courts, and Missoni knee boots-- chic, classic, comfortable and beautifully-made.
I wear brown suede ankle boots and Geox (and Timberland or Gabor furry boots in severe weather) for casual Winter wear, and sneakers, pumps and Chloe flat sandals in Summer.

I like understated suede shoes, but they're a bit impractical in our climate. (As most thin-soled Italian shoes also tend to be, tbh)

I treat suede with moisture-repellent spray before first wear, and use Kiwi Guardsman Gloss on black leather. (Bit difficult to find stockists lately--does anyone polish shoes any more?)

*Always dampen the brush slightly before polishing --the secret to really shiny shoes!*
Old fashioned shoe shops stock it €2-50 a pop, and there are several generations that have no idea how to polish a shoe :D
 

between the bridges

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Tis hard to bate the marching boots...


 

GDPR

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Nice shoe. Gotta be able to carry it off wearing those, me thinks.

Mrs.D likes to wear heels/stiletto shoes among the tonnes of footwear that she buys.
Indeed they are a bit over the top; but if the rest of you is dressed in a restrained though stylish you can carry it off.
 
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Shoes, shoes, shoes.

I'm with Gerhard here; I buy very good shoes and expect them to last many years.

I have several pairs of Church's. Handmade and they actually do a relining service.

I'm slightly mental about my polisihing regime. I was given various tips by a former army brigadier so here goes:

The polish. Kiwi will do. Use a coin to scoop some into the lid of the container. Light the nub of polish with a cigarette lighter in order to turn it into liquid. You'll need to blow it out once it has been liquified. Brush it on to the shoe. Leave for a while (30 minutes+), then buff with a brush.

The shine. Strict military etiquette dictates that this should be performed using the silk stocking of a single girl (the right silk stocking, no less). In the absence of that I use a piece of linen, plenty of spit and elbow grease.

The shine should be sufficient that you can slide your shod foot beside a woman's and to be able to look up her skirt. If she is wearing PVC knickers you may well find yourself looking at your own reflection, which is somewhat unnerving.

BTW, the last time aI bought a pair my wife baulked at the price. When I explained that my oldest pair had been bought in 1982 she decided that they were a good investment. They cost about €500.

ETA: the lining is calf leather.

 
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D

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Yes, I'm a nut about polishing too. If they're not shining like the glans...

Eh...

Ahem.
 
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BTW, speaking of maintaining shoes, these were very popular back in the day:



Blakey's "segs".

I recall in school one day, someone very audibly click-clacking their way down the faux-marble corridor. All very impressive as he strode confidently on his way until . . .

. . . scrabble scrabble, slip, slide, slip, *thump* "OOOOOCH".

The class broke down in laughter while the teacher went to check on how badly the guy had landed. Even the teacher was sniggering when he came back.

I don't think that they would work on your shoes, ReF.
 
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Blokesbloke

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Is it possible to walk in stillettos without some damage to the foot?
 


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