Feminist bias in the Irish media

petaljam

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Do you feel similarly about teenagers? 18 and 19year olds can vote, make up about 1.5% of the adult population so we should have 3 teenagers as TDs , no?
People don't remain teenagers forever, so it's not clear that the needs and interests of teenagers are genuinely that different from those of older people.
 


petaljam

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and 31% Of candidates were women which means that even with 51% of the vote, many female voters voted for men rather than women.
Among the well known candidates standing in safe seats, what was the percentage of women?

Would it be safe to say that female candidates were more often in a position where they were just less likely to get elected than the average male candidate? (I don't know in the republic, but it's definitely the case at Westminster.)
 

Watcher2

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Among the well known candidates standing in safe seats, what was the percentage of women?

Would it be safe to say that female candidates were more often in a position where they were just less likely to get elected than the average male candidate? (I don't know in the republic, but it's definitely the case at Westminster.)
I don’t know, I don’t have those figures, nor does it particularly matter In my view. Shiel has been rabbiting on for years about how unrepresentative the Dail is for women. The simple matter is though that in politics, your gender is not what makes you representative. It’s policies etc. I have seen no evidence that when Irish elected female politicians at cabinet table were anymore “female leaning” in their influence on policies. I may be wring and perhaps Shiel has examples a plenty of how the Mary’s (Harney, Coughlan,etc) or any other woman, Gemma Hussey et al brought a more “female bent“ to eventual policies being implemented that would otherwise have not been brought by their male counterparts.
 

petaljam

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I don’t know, I don’t have those figures, nor does it particularly matter In my view. Shiel has been rabbiting on for years about how unrepresentative the Dail is for women. The simple matter is though that in politics, your gender is not what makes you representative. It’s policies etc. I have seen no evidence that when Irish elected female politicians at cabinet table were anymore “female leaning” in their influence on policies. I may be wring and perhaps Shiel has examples a plenty of how the Mary’s (Harney, Coughlan,etc) or any other woman, Gemma Hussey et al brought a more “female bent“ to eventual policies being implemented that would otherwise have not been brought by their male counterparts.
I don't think it necessarily works like that though - in practice women who get into power while they are a tiny minority tend to be very similar to their male counterparts. Like Margaret Thatcher.

That could be because that kind of women are attracted to that masculine environment, or it could be that acting "like men" is the best way to get into power when power is largely held by men.

Which is why it's possibly not surprising that New Zealand has had something of a record of having women in power before a Jacinda Ardern came along.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
I've never found the need to develop an ethical position on feminism, mainly because I can come up with logical arguments that says discrimination against women has no underlying logic to it. Through all the factual history I've read, and it is a fair wodge, I've never found one indication anywhere that says intelligence and ability are doled out by gender. Not a scrap.

One thing I've begun to wonder about is that of the headliner females who have done well in traditional male bastions such as politics and investment banking, science and so on one thing I've noticed is that they seldom mention or acknowledge a glass ceiling at all. To the point where I've seen and heard comment by leading female asset managers that they are actually annoyed when well-meaning people approach them on the basis of 'you've done well for a woman' when what they really want is to be asked to speak or address an audience because they are successful at what they do.

They don't always react well to being seen through the gender prism I think when they've spent quite a lot of time just treating it as if it didn't exist. They've risen because they've brought the numbers, same as any male asset manager.
 

shiel

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it’s not unjust. The only way it would be unjust is if women were told how to vote. Votes are free in this country. it is your suggestions here that would be unjust if they were to be implemented.
We are all told how to vote by the powerful vested interests that control the media.


Remedying the under representation of women is not part of their agenda.
 
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Watcher2

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We are all told how to vote by the powerful vested interests that control the media.


Remedying the under representation of women is not part of their agenda.
we are all told how we should vote but we have the choice when it comes to actually voting.
 

Watcher2

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I've never found the need to develop an ethical position on feminism, mainly because I can come up with logical arguments that says discrimination against women has no underlying logic to it. Through all the factual history I've read, and it is a fair wodge, I've never found one indication anywhere that says intelligence and ability are doled out by gender. Not a scrap.

One thing I've begun to wonder about is that of the headliner females who have done well in traditional male bastions such as politics and investment banking, science and so on one thing I've noticed is that they seldom mention or acknowledge a glass ceiling at all. To the point where I've seen and heard comment by leading female asset managers that they are actually annoyed when well-meaning people approach them on the basis of 'you've done well for a woman' when what they really want is to be asked to speak or address an audience because they are successful at what they do.

They don't always react well to being seen through the gender prism I think when they've spent quite a lot of time just treating it as if it didn't exist. They've risen because they've brought the numbers, same as any male asset manager.
Maybe, I have not seen any research on that (not that I have looked for it tbh).
 

shiel

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we are all told how we should vote but we have the choice when it comes to actually voting.
We are all influenced by mass media in decisions in relation to all aspects of our lives.

Why do major businesses spend millions on ads?

The row about the power of the internet replacing the power of mainstream media is relevant here.

All of that power to influence decisions is really let loose in the political field.

As I said the under representation of women in the parliaments of the world is not part of that narrative.
 

Watcher2

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We are all influenced by mass media in decisions in relation to all aspects of our lives.

Why do major businesses spend millions on ads?

The row about the power of the internet replacing the power of mainstream media is relevant here.

All of that power to influence decisions is really let loose in the political field.

As I said the under representation of women in the parliaments of the world is not part of that narrative.
yeah, I know about the Cambridge Analytica factor in Trump and Brexit. I agree with you there. But that’s not to wha5 I referred either.
 

shiel

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and 31% Of candidates were women which means that even with 51% of the vote, many female voters voted for men rather than women.

This is proof that what you have been spouting for a few years now is undemocratic nonsense.
The basic facts are that women, because they live longer, are a majority in the electorate.

Yet their interests, perspectives and talents have been excluded from political representation for centuries.

Even after receiving the right to vote a century or so ago they are still marginalised in the democratic institutions of what are supposed to be representative democracies the world over.

The fact that in 2016 a highly competent woman candidate was defeated by an incompetent misogynist in such controversial circumstances for the most powerful political post in the world was highly significant.

When are women going to learn the lesson of a misogynist being elected to the presidency of the US in 2016?

There is no solution to women's under-representation but for women themselves to reverse that decision in the democracies of the world?

As a majority in the electorate women should make their under-representation a major political issue and vote for women candidates.

They will need the aid of the media in that but that has not happened so far.
 

Watcher2

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The basic facts are that women, because they live longer, are a majority in the electorate.

Yet their interests, perspectives and talents have been excluded from political representation for centuries.

Even after receiving the right to vote a century or so ago they are still marginalised in the democratic institutions of what are supposed to be representative democracies the world over.

The fact that in 2016 a highly competent woman candidate was defeated by an incompetent misogynist in such controversial circumstances for the most powerful political post in the world was highly significant.

When are women going to learn the lesson of a misogynist being elected to the presidency of the US in 2016?

There is no solution to women's under-representation but for women themselves to reverse that decision in the democracies of the world?

As a majority in the electorate women should make their under-representation a major political issue and vote for women candidates.

They will need the aid of the media in that but that has not happened so far.
Where is your evidence that outcomes and policies will be different if more women are voted into power? What in gods name is the use of just more women being elected? Like I mentioned yesterday, many women have held senior positions in governments around the world. There was nothing unique about their policy areas just because they were female.
 

shiel

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Where is your evidence that outcomes and policies will be different if more women are voted into power? What in gods name is the use of just more women being elected? Like I mentioned yesterday, many women have held senior positions in governments around the world. There was nothing unique about their policy areas just because they were female.
Women are a vested interest like all other vested interests.

They compete for resources with the male section of society.

If they were better represented they would have more power to implement policies that favour their self interest.
 

shiel

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I don’t know, I don’t have those figures, nor does it particularly matter In my view. Shiel has been rabbiting on for years about how unrepresentative the Dail is for women. The simple matter is though that in politics, your gender is not what makes you representative. It’s policies etc. I have seen no evidence that when Irish elected female politicians at cabinet table were anymore “female leaning” in their influence on policies. I may be wring and perhaps Shiel has examples a plenty of how the Mary’s (Harney, Coughlan,etc) or any other woman, Gemma Hussey et al brought a more “female bent“ to eventual policies being implemented that would otherwise have not been brought by their male counterparts.
A Dail with nearly 80% male TDs will not have much of a female influence.
 

Clanrickard

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Women are a vested interest like all other vested interests.

They compete for resources with the male section of society.

If they were better represented they would have more power to implement policies that favour their self interest.
Jesus you are one sad cucked poor divil. Politicians should bring in policies that favour everyone. A policy that is good for men is good for women.
 

shiel

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Jesus you are one sad cucked poor divil. Politicians should bring in policies that favour everyone. A policy that is good for men is good for women.
If all child care facilities was funded by the state women would compete with men for jobs on a more equal footing.

I do not know how much that would cost but it would probably mean some other area would have to be cut.

There is a limit to what level tax can go to.

We saw that in 2010 when the country went broke.
 


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