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FG propose a Green Ireland (“guaranteed Irish”) label


idefix

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From this press release

The latest Fine Gael rip-off survey last month showed that consumers are paying mark-ups of over 200% on basic foodstuffs in our major supermarkets, while farmers continue to endure falling prices for their produce. Large retailers are making huge profits from the Irish market at the expense of both consumers and producers with the consequence that quality Irish food is being undermined and farmers are at risk of going out of business.


Fine Gael's solution (among others) to this rip-off is to put greener labels on Irish food products. Fantastic idea and they get to spit on free trade at the same time. :roll:
 

west_brit

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Didn't F.F. do that in the 30's and didn't we have an economic war :?:
 

MacCoise

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would produce from the north qualify for a green label or do they get orange ones?
 

west_brit

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Labour might try to pitch a Red Stamp though then again it may be a little pinker then red :wink:
 

aodh_rua

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west_brit said:
Labour might try to pitch a Red Stamp though then again it may be a little pinker then red :wink:
And I suppose Fianna Fáil would wrap their produce in a carefully crumpled brown envelope and Sinn Féin would bury the stuff so it can be eaten in the future if the shelves become occupied by sasanach grub. :D

Seriously though - I think this is a good idea on a number of levels. There's no doubt that if Irish farmers could get a decent cut of the store prices there'd be less need for subsidies (they currently get around a third of the supermarket price), and anything to encourage people to buy Irish might help with that by strengthening the farmer's position. There's also the dieticians' advice that we should eat more produce that is in season and from our local areas. I suppose this would help us identify more clearly what is Irish and what's not.
 

david

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People complain about 'rip-off' food prices.
















Then go and shop at Tesco.
 

idefix

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aodh_rua said:
Seriously though - I think this is a good idea on a number of levels. There's no doubt that if Irish farmers could get a decent cut of the store prices there'd be less need for subsidies (they currently get around a third of the supermarket price), and anything to encourage people to buy Irish might help with that by strengthening the farmer's position. There's also the dieticians' advice that we should eat more produce that is in season and from our local areas. I suppose this would help us identify more clearly what is Irish and what's not.
Do you see anything bad about it like that consumers could end up paying more?
 

Super Lily

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idefix said:
aodh_rua said:
Seriously though - I think this is a good idea on a number of levels. There's no doubt that if Irish farmers could get a decent cut of the store prices there'd be less need for subsidies (they currently get around a third of the supermarket price), and anything to encourage people to buy Irish might help with that by strengthening the farmer's position. There's also the dieticians' advice that we should eat more produce that is in season and from our local areas. I suppose this would help us identify more clearly what is Irish and what's not.
Do you see anything bad about it like that consumers could end up paying more?
How?
 

MacCoise

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MacCoise said:
would produce from the north qualify for a green label or do they get orange ones?
my point is would produce from the north be included?
 

Super Lily

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idefix said:
Super Lily said:
If somebody buys something because its got a green label (equating it with being 'good') rather than products without the green label which happen to be cheaper.
That is consumer choice. If people choose to buy Irish beef over Argentinian Beef, even with a substanial price difference, then no-one can complain. It would also end the farming lobby whinging about foreign competition unfairly competing.
 

idefix

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Super Lily said:
That is consumer choice. If people choose to buy Irish beef over Argentinian Beef, even with a substanial price difference, then no-one can complain. It would also end the farming lobby whinging about foreign competition unfairly competing.
Can I complain if the same people who are whinging about being ripped off are buying what is more expensive?
 

Super Lily

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idefix said:
Super Lily said:
That is consumer choice. If people choose to buy Irish beef over Argentinian Beef, even with a substanial price difference, then no-one can complain. It would also end the farming lobby whinging about foreign competition unfairly competing.
Can I complain if the same people who are whinging about being ripped off are buying what is more expensive?
If someone chooses to buy Irish beef over its South Americian equiviliant, even though there is choice there in the shop, then yes.

Some of us see and taste no difference, others do. It is probably the same for many people when buying wine. If people want to spend more, then so be it. But the base price should not be extorbitiontally bumped up.
 

aodh_rua

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idefix said:
aodh_rua said:
Seriously though - I think this is a good idea on a number of levels. There's no doubt that if Irish farmers could get a decent cut of the store prices there'd be less need for subsidies (they currently get around a third of the supermarket price), and anything to encourage people to buy Irish might help with that by strengthening the farmer's position. There's also the dieticians' advice that we should eat more produce that is in season and from our local areas. I suppose this would help us identify more clearly what is Irish and what's not.
Do you see anything bad about it like that consumers could end up paying more?
I think that consumers are paying over the odds because of a lack of proper competition and transparency in pricing. The mark-ups that Tesco and Dunnes make on foodstuffs are pretty striking - you can see some examples here.

I think that clearly identifying what's Irish produce as part of an overall campaign on supporting Irish farmers is a good idea. Neither the farmers or consumers are getting value because of the actions of the supermarkets, dairies and abbatoirs. With the fast approaching demise or vast reduction in farm payments something needs to be done and this is a start.
 

idefix

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Super Lily said:
If someone chooses to buy Irish beef over its South Americian equiviliant, even though there is choice there in the shop, then yes.
Thank you, I'll continue to complain about FG so since presuambly the same logic can be applied to a party who seem to promote people whinging while making that choice.
 

idefix

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aodh_rua said:
I think that consumers are paying over the odds because of a lack of proper competition and transparency in pricing. The mark-ups that Tesco and Dunnes make on foodstuffs are pretty striking - you can see some examples here.
How about some examples from Lidl and Aldi.
 
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