Finally searching in the right places for the first Irish inhabitants?



ruserious

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"Researchers to look under the Irish Sea for evidence of first settlers".

Shouldn't that be: "Researchers to look for evidence of first settlers under the Irish Sea?"
 

jmcc

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"Researchers to look under the Irish Sea for evidence of first settlers".

Shouldn't that be: "Researchers to look for evidence of first settlers under the Irish Sea?"
It is from The Churnal. :) Headlines have to be short.
 

EUrJokingMeRight

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It'll be 'found' that the original Irish were Eritrean and you'll all have to hand over the keys of your house to immigrants.

:D
 

Ardillaun

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"Researchers to look under the Irish Sea for evidence of first settlers".

Shouldn't that be: "Researchers to look for evidence of first settlers under the Irish Sea?"
That's nowhere near as confusing as many headlines, for me anyway. I'm like the online Irish version of Postman Pat, swearing at the screen half the time. For example, in Canada, the media love using 'mum' instead of 'silent' to save those precious three letters e.g. Premier mum on scandal. I'm immediately wondering what his mother did before I catch my mistake.
 

Ardillaun

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It'll be 'found' that the original Irish were Eritrean and you'll all have to hand over the keys of your house to immigrants.

:D

No, I want aliyah. I'm going home to my peeps or at least I'll lay claim to some suitably fortified Somali beachfront. Just send me the forms.
 
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Ardillaun

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Paleolandscape is a word of almost Germanic proportions. This issue ebbs and flows and can be found in Michael Viney's wonderful columns occasionally. Are there youtube animations showing the evolution of our coastline?
I recall some archaeological research (in Sligo?) that was in shallow water but was from the more recent past.

It is claimed that the shore was the preferred route in the gradual migration of humans from Africa around the Indian Ocean to Australia, based on our skills in foraging from there, and later from the Middle East and Africa to Europe. If you look at where the ancient coastline was you can see that many of our early inhabitants could have bypassed what became Britain on their way from Iberia to here. This sounds like a fascinating area of research. Good luck to the lads from Bradford and the rest.
 
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Catalpast

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We don't know how the first people arrived in Ireland

- as far as we can tell they arrived in the post glacial period

- in all probability after the waters around us had risen so that boats would be needed

Doggerbank IIRC is a raised platform that would have been dry long after the end of the Last Ice Age
 

Catalpast

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Paleolandscape is a word of almost Germanic proportions. This issue ebbs and flows and is washed up in Viney's columns occasionally. Are there some nice youtube animations showing the evolution of our coastline? It is claimed that the shore was the preferred route in the migration of humans from Africa around the Indian Ocean to Australia and later from the Middle East and Africa to Europe. If you look at where the ancient coastline was you can see that many of our early inhabitants could have bypassed what became Britain on their way from Iberia to here. this sounds like a fascinating area of research. Good luck to the lads from Bradford.
Good points - its as just a good a possibility as otherwise that the 1st people here came up from the South

- and not the East
 

jmcc

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We don't know how the first people arrived in Ireland

- as far as we can tell they arrived in the post glacial period
Not necessarily. Some of the South and South East of Ireland was not covered by glaciers. Boats were the fastest means of travel thousands of years ago due to the forestation. Because of the inundations caused by the melting ice, a lot of the early settlements and archeoligical evidence are probably underwater.
 
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Catalpast

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Not necessarily. Some of the South and South East of Ireland was not covered by glaciers. Boats were the fastest means of travel thousands of years ago due to the forestation. Because of the inundations caused by the melting ice, a lot of the early settlements and archeoligical evidence are probably underwater.
Not necessarily

- with the waters rising at a relatively rapid rate

- then its unlikely that a seashore would be a great place to set up camp
 

jmcc

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Not necessarily

- with the waters rising at a relatively rapid rate

- then its unlikely that a seashore would be a great place to set up camp
The rise in levels may have been catastrophically fast.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
For a fellow so devoted to weaving history out of mythology old Cattlepest seems very afraid of history itself.
 

petaljam

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Paleolandscape is a word of almost Germanic proportions. This issue ebbs and flows and can be found in Michael Viney's wonderful columns occasionally. Are there youtube animations showing the evolution of our coastline?
I recall some archaeological research (in Sligo?) that was in shallow water but was from the more recent past.

It is claimed that the shore was the preferred route in the gradual migration of humans from Africa around the Indian Ocean to Australia, based on our skills in foraging from there, and later from the Middle East and Africa to Europe. If you look at where the ancient coastline was you can see that many of our early inhabitants could have bypassed what became Britain on their way from Iberia to here. This sounds like a fascinating area of research. Good luck to the lads from Bradford and the rest.
Yes, wasnt that the basis of Bob Quinn's "Atlantean" book? I always thought it seemed quite plausible but I don't know what the current thinking on it is. Maybe this will bring it into the mainstream.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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There was something intriguing about the idea that the coast of Europe was a migratory possibility as well as the traditional view of a westward migration from the Danube basin, following another migration from the east.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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If humans followed rivers, presumably because they needed access to fresh-water and the game, birds etc that would have lived along the banks and reeds then is it not natural also for exploration to have taken place along coastlines where there would have been food available in the form of shellfish and so on?
 


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