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Fine Gael's Simon Coveney addresses DUP's annual conference.


theloner

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The Fine Gael TD said he was delighted to take part in the conference's rural affairs breakfast at the La Mon hotel. Johnathan Bell spoke at FG's conference earlier this year. It seems like a blooming relationship as Taoiseach Enda Kenny and Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore stood side by side with the DUP during a Remembrance Day service north of the border.
Simon Coveney will become the first ever senior Irish minister to speak at the DUP's ard fheis in Belfast on Friday.

Diane Dodds MEP said it was important to engage with “all actors within the Common Agricultural Policy reform process . . . Simon Coveney has over the last number of months prepared himself for the task ahead. He has visited other parts of the UK in recent weeks, and indeed has visited and spoken to many of the lead member states''.

FG and the DUP would have quite a lot in common, not least their attitude towards the Irish language. Earlier this year Taoiseach Enda Kenny created a controversy when he told an audience of students and academics in China that he saw no timescale for the unification of Ireland. Mr Kenny was responding to a questioner who said there had been “unremitting efforts to unify with the Six Counties in Northern Ireland. Do you have a time schedule, and what progress have you made..?''. Mr Kenny said “there isn’t a timescale''.

FG has also failed to deal with loyalist/British atrocities in Ireland, most notably the Dublin-Monaghan bombings. Along with Alan Shatter's use of the term 'Londonderry', many unionists would feel at home in FG. However many wouldn't be so impressed with the fact that FG was most serious fascist movement to emerge in Ireland during the 1930s. At their height, the Blueshirts had as many as 48,000 members.



Or maybe those Nazi roots wouldn't be frowned upon too much.



BBC News - Irish minister Simon Coveney attends DUP conference
 


between the bridges

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jasus lonely are ye that bored?
 

Just Jack

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When Ireland is liberated, the DUP will merge nicely into Fine Gael.

It would constitute a fairly formidable electoral bloc.

Irish unionists.
 

Estragon

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Do the DUP have no standards at all?
 
C

Castle Ray

It's an interesting move for the DUP to invite the party of government in Eire. Changed days from throwing snowballs at the like of them. DUP are also inviting the Secretary of State to address conference tomorrow. Changed days from attacking them at city hall.

Leaving aside the daftness articulated in the op, surely the largest NI party engaging with others from different viewpoints is no bad thing?
 

factual

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It's an interesting move for the DUP to invite the party of government in Eire. Changed days from throwing snowballs at the like of them. DUP are also inviting the Secretary of State to address conference tomorrow. Changed days from attacking them at city hall.

Leaving aside the daftness articulated in the op, surely the largest NI party engaging with others from different viewpoints is no bad thing?
This seems desirable - a form of outreach. There is a thaw going on in the all-Ireland relationship between Dublin and unionists.

There was a time when no party in Dublin would have attended a DUP conference - it would have been bad for votes. I believe that we in Dublin have now a gradually changing attude to unionists and unionists have a different attitude to us in Dublin. An outworking of the GFA.

There is a lot to be said for Dublin and the unionist tradition forming bridges and alliances - whether or not there is to be a UI this sort of relationship building can only be positive for both sides of the border as we move forward into a better future for all.
 
Last edited:
C

Castle Ray

This seems desirable - a form of outreach. There is a thaw going on in the all-Ireland relationship between Dublin and unionists.

I believe that we in Dublin have a changing attude to unionists and unionists have a different attitude to us in Dublin. An outworking of the GFA.

There is a lot to be said for Dublin and the unionist tradition forming bridges and alliances - whether or not there is to be a UI this sort of relationship building can only be positive for both sides of the border.
There is a lot in that post of merit.

Breaking down barriers and forming relationships is important for all Irish people and one of the most, if not the most important relationship is the relationship with the UK. This remains a greater silly and dangerous, blinkered taboo for more Irish people than any inter-Irish peoples issue. Until that myopic attitude is conquered Irish people will remain divided.

The DUP, who neither of us support, are at least showing a willingness to engage. I commend them and FG for that.
 

factual

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There is a lot in that post of merit.

Breaking down barriers and forming relationships is important for all Irish people and one of the most, if not the most important relationship is the relationship with the UK. This remains a greater silly and dangerous, blinkered taboo for more Irish people than any inter-Irish peoples issue. Until that myopic attitude is conquered Irish people will remain divided.

The DUP, who neither of us support, are at least showing a willingness to engage. I commend them and FG for that.
The visitation of the Queen to Dublin did show that things are moving forward in terms of Dublin-London as well as the Dublin-Belfast movement that is the subject of this thread. Don't regard the folks on the forum here as representative of modern Ireland.
 

cricket

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Who in their right mind would object to this.
Had to laugh at the OP about the Chinese asking about a unification timescale. What else could Kenny have said ? Somewhere between 3 months and 150 years ?
 

factual

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Who in their right mind would object to this.
Had to laugh at the OP about the Chinese asking about a unification timescale. What else could Kenny have said ? Somewhere between 3 months and 150 years ?
No timescale was negotiated in the GFA. The only way to a UI is good arguments, that persuade a majority of voters.
 
C

Castle Ray

The visitation of the Queen to Dublin did show that things are moving forward in terms of Dublin-London as well as the Dublin-Belfast movement that is the subject of this thread. Don't regard the folks on the forum here as representative of modern Ireland.
I certainly don't regard this thread, forum or board to be representative of the different peoples in Ireland.

HM The Queen's visit to Eire last year was a truly ground breaking event and most certainly changed my attitude to the ROI.
 
C

Castle Ray

No timescale was negotiated in the GFA. The only way to a UI is good arguments, that persuade a majority of voters.
You are completely correct. For that there is no timescale or agenda. Just a method. No party has an argument that stacks up for such an event.
 

hiding behind a poster

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The Fine Gael TD said he was delighted to take part in the conference's rural affairs breakfast at the La Mon hotel. Johnathan Bell spoke at FG's conference earlier this year. It seems like a blooming relationship as Taoiseach Enda Kenny and Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore stood side by side with the DUP during a Remembrance Day service north of the border.
Simon Coveney will become the first ever senior Irish minister to speak at the DUP's ard fheis in Belfast on Friday.

Diane Dodds MEP said it was important to engage with “all actors within the Common Agricultural Policy reform process . . . Simon Coveney has over the last number of months prepared himself for the task ahead. He has visited other parts of the UK in recent weeks, and indeed has visited and spoken to many of the lead member states''.

FG and the DUP would have quite a lot in common, not least their attitude towards the Irish language. Earlier this year Taoiseach Enda Kenny created a controversy when he told an audience of students and academics in China that he saw no timescale for the unification of Ireland. Mr Kenny was responding to a questioner who said there had been “unremitting efforts to unify with the Six Counties in Northern Ireland. Do you have a time schedule, and what progress have you made..?''. Mr Kenny said “there isn’t a timescale''.

FG has also failed to deal with loyalist/British atrocities in Ireland, most notably the Dublin-Monaghan bombings. Along with Alan Shatter's use of the term 'Londonderry', many unionists would feel at home in FG. However many wouldn't be so impressed with the fact that FG was most serious fascist movement to emerge in Ireland during the 1930s. At their height, the Blueshirts had as many as 48,000 members.



Or maybe those Nazi roots wouldn't be frowned upon too much.



BBC News - Irish minister Simon Coveney attends DUP conference
:roll: Yawn. Never has so much sh*te been squeezed into one post.
 

hiding behind a poster

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When Ireland is liberated, the DUP will merge nicely into Fine Gael.

It would constitute a fairly formidable electoral bloc.

Irish unionists.
No they won't, you stupid idiot.
 

death or glory

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This shows the normalisation of politics in northern Ireland. This should be welcomed. I even seem to remember that SF invited a unionist politician to speak at its last conference.
 

Glaucon

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Fine Gael is a confirmed West British party so this is hardly surprising. I would've thought the UUP would have been a better fit for their patrician Empire yearning than the loudmouths in the DUP, all the same.
 

death or glory

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Would you not welcome two parties from both sides of the border having a working relationship?
 

runwiththewind

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There is a lot in that post of merit.

Breaking down barriers and forming relationships is important for all Irish people and one of the most, if not the most important relationship is the relationship with the UK. This remains a greater silly and dangerous, blinkered taboo for more Irish people than any inter-Irish peoples issue. Until that myopic attitude is conquered Irish people will remain divided.

The DUP, who neither of us support, are at least showing a willingness to engage. I commend them and FG for that.
What exactly are you trying to say here?
 

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