first tanks deployed 100 years ago today during the battle of the Somme

silverharp

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so this piece of weaponry is 100 years old today. Not a game changer in WW1 but certainly decided a lot of ground battles in WW2. Oddly Russia arguably came up with the best mix of tanks over the period of the war, the Germans were shocked when they met Russian tanks like the KV and T34 at the start.
Since ww2 their importance has probably diminished but they are still an important piece of firepower in any large army.

[video=youtube;vd4Xw_sLZgM]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vd4Xw_sLZgM[/video]
 


Dearghoul

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so this piece of weaponry is 100 years old today. Not a game changer in WW1 but certainly decided a lot of ground battles in WW2. Oddly Russia arguably came up with the best mix of tanks over the period of the war, the Germans were shocked when they met Russian tanks like the KV and T34 at the start.
Since ww2 their importance has probably diminished but they are still an important piece of firepower in any large army.

[video=youtube;vd4Xw_sLZgM]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vd4Xw_sLZgM[/video]
The french immediately leapt 20 years forward with the F17 light, full turret revolving tank which was used by among many other nations in the post war era, the White Russian forces, from which they were captured by the Reds and captured from the red army by the Germans in the initial stages of WW2. These, first modern tanks were petrol engined.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_FT
 

pierrepoint

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There is a fine example of a Mk1 in the Imperial War Museum in London. Fascinating machine.
 

Tin Foil Hat

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There was a good item on Pat Kenny today about the history of tank warfare. The contributor (I can't remember his name) opined that tank warfare ended during the first Iraq war, when Iraqi tanks, and their crew, were vaporised, one by one, by laser guided missiles.
 

Dame_Enda

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They sortof were a game changer at the Somme but their importance was not understood. They were seen as an infantry support vehicle and that is how they were used in 1940 by the Allies and indeed by the Japanese in WW2. Consequently they were not used effectively then.
 

Morgellons

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war is ************************
 

silverharp

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The french immediately leapt 20 years forward with the F17 light, full turret revolving tank which was used by among many other nations in the post war era, the White Russian forces, from which they were captured by the Reds and captured from the red army by the Germans in the initial stages of WW2. These, first modern tanks were petrol engined.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_FT
the French probably win the award for worst results with the best kit
 

Ex celt

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Another British Invention.
It is said that over 60% of all worthwhile inventions were by British people. This is another amazing statistic. Penicillin,splitting the atom,vaccinations,antiseptics,jet engines, the flush toilet,concentration camps,computers,discovery of DNA and many many more. You really have to hand it to them.
 

Ex celt

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The "game changer" in WW1 was the British counter attack in the summer of 1918 against Padre Pio Pearse's gallant allies. The Royal Naval Blockade of the Hun also had its part to play.
The late american involvement was totally insignificant. They took part really in only one peripheral skirmish.
 

silverharp

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here was a nutty prototype that the Germans were working on near the end of ww2 called the Maus. I think Ferdinand Porsche was behind this one , in a way these industrialists deserve some scorn for trying to give hope to a deluded regime.

 

Ireniall

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The french immediately leapt 20 years forward with the F17 light, full turret revolving tank which was used by among many other nations in the post war era, the White Russian forces, from which they were captured by the Reds and captured from the red army by the Germans in the initial stages of WW2. These, first modern tanks were petrol engined.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_FT
Ya -it's increasingly conceded that the French had the best tanks at the start of the war but used them in the wrong manner. Theirs was a crisis of leadership it seems-the 'successful' WW1 generation in charge proving an obstacle to a dynamic and innovative defense strategy for the thirties.
 

firefly123

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Having watched many a video from the Syrian conflict I think I'd rather be a low value infantryman than vapourised out the turret of a tank
 

RasherHash

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here was a nutty prototype that the Germans were working on near the end of ww2 called the Maus. I think Ferdinand Porsche was behind this one , in a way these industrialists deserve some scorn for trying to give hope to a deluded regime.

I'm sure if the Brits were facing defeat their industrialists would rally round and try and save the situation.

Why should the Germans be any different?
 

Ireniall

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so this piece of weaponry is 100 years old today. Not a game changer in WW1 but certainly decided a lot of ground battles in WW2. Oddly Russia arguably came up with the best mix of tanks over the period of the war, the Germans were shocked when they met Russian tanks like the KV and T34 at the start.
Since ww2 their importance has probably diminished but they are still an important piece of firepower in any large army.

[video=youtube;vd4Xw_sLZgM]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vd4Xw_sLZgM[/video]
I think the T34 was outclassed towards the end of the war. It had a number of drawbacks not least the poor scopes but also the slowest reload of all tanks. It had no heating and was very cramped for the crew with their heavy clothes. It was peculiar in that the gunner had to walk around with the turret when it was traversing. That it was a game changer when it first arrived is perhaps as much an indication of the level that the Germans were at too. Like all Russian tanks it had one huge plus though-she burned diesel.
 

RasherHash

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Ya -it's increasingly conceded that the French had the best tanks at the start of the war but used them in the wrong manner. Theirs was a crisis of leadership it seems-the 'successful' WW1 generation in charge proving an obstacle to a dynamic and innovative defense strategy for the thirties.
The French also had better tanks in WW1 and a better rifle, the Chassepot, in the Franko-Prussian squabble.
 

silverharp

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I'm sure if the Brits were facing defeat their industrialists would rally round and try and save the situation.

Why should the Germans be any different?
they were indulging his fantasies , I dont think the Maus would have even made it beyond a napkin in Britain or the US
 


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