Flu deaths vs Covid-19 deaths

Patslatt1

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See How Deadly Was the 2019-2020 Flu Season? and How deadly is the coronavirus? Scientists are close to an answer
Familiarity with Flu prevents panic over death rates,unlike Covid-19 deaths. CDC figures in the link show roughly 24,000 to 62,000 US flu deaths a year, a relatively small figure in the US population of 350 millions. A roughly 1.25% normal death rate from all causes is 4.4 millions a year.
If 1% of the infected population die of C-19 as estimated in the second link and a fifth of the US population become infected in a year, 70 million infections would lead to 700,000 deaths a year. That's a sixth of the normal death rate of 4.4 millions. Over a few years, as the accumulated percentage of the population infected approached herd immunity at about 60 to 70%, infections would taper off quickly barring mutations like those of the flu.
If 5.6% of the population infected over the age of 65 die, that requires obvious public health strategies for protecting the most vulnerable of that age group in nursing homes. Consideration should also be given for extra protection for all other people vulnerable to C-19,mainly those suffering from comorbidities such as cardiac illness and diabetes. Those people and people approaching age 65 still in employment should be allowed to work exclusively from home or given financial incentives for early retirement.
 
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bactrian

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May 11, 2004
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See How Deadly Was the 2019-2020 Flu Season? and How deadly is the coronavirus? Scientists are close to an answer
Familiarity with Flu prevents panic over death rates,unlike Covid-19 deaths. CDC figures in the link show roughly 24,000 to 62,000 US flu deaths a year, a relatively small figure in the US population of 350 millions. A roughly 1.25% normal death rate from all causes is 4.4 millions a year.
If 1% of the infected population die of C-19 as estimated in the second link and a fifth of the US population become infected in a year, 70 million infections would lead to 700,000 deaths a year. That's a sixth of the normal death rate of 4.4 millions. Over a few years, as the accumulated percentage of the population infected approached herd immunity at about 60 to 70%, infections would taper off quickly barring mutations like those of the flu.
If 5.6% of the population infected over the age of 65 die, that requires obvious public health strategies for protecting the most vulnerable of that age group in nursing homes. Consideration should also be given for extra protection for all other people vulnerable to C-19,mainly those suffering from comorbidities such as cardiac illness and diabetes. Those people and people approaching age 65 still in employment should be allowed to work exclusively from home or given financial incentives for early retirement.
If I understand your post Covid_19 accounts for a one sixth in the increase in deaths (however caused)in the US . "However caused" would make Covid_19 the biggest single killer.
 

Patslatt1

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If I understand your post Covid_19 accounts for a one sixth in the increase in deaths (however caused)in the US . "However caused" would make Covid_19 the biggest single killer.
Cardiovascular diseases are the biggest killers I believe.
 

NaturalOnlyPlz

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Nov 27, 2019
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The flu vs covid thing was beaten to death a long time ago, I'm not sure why they're bringing it up now. There's not even a comparison.

Note also that the people who die from flu are generally very old and at death's door anyway. This is definitely not the case with covid-19 deaths where many people with decades of life expectancy left die or are left permanently damaged.
 


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