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Flying the Flag


euryalus

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Nov 2, 2009
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I went out for a (very rare) trip to the pub yesterday afternoon, having finished my tasks for the day, and got into a conversation about the Irish flag protests. We decided that, as the Union Flag is flown above Witney Town Hall for no more than about two days a year, we ought to start a "flag protest", with the aim of reaching an agreement whereby the national flag is flown for a set number of days per year -perhaps 30 days? As Witney is David Cameron's Parliamentary constituency the "Witney Flag Protest" would clearly accrue at least some coverage in the press.

This does, however, raise an interesting question - how many days per year will the Union Flag be flown over Belfast City Hall under the proposed compromise agreement with the nationalists; is it as much as 30 days per annum? And if, in a typical English town, the flag is not flown every day of the year, why should Belfast residents (or some of them) expect the flag to be flown every day?
 

shiel

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Feb 14, 2011
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16,889
That about sums up the issue.

Some democratically elected people are willing to damage the reconciliation efforts inherent in the Good Friday Agreement because of an argument about the number of times a flag flies over a building in Belfast.
 

oneoffireland

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oneoffireland
That about sums up the issue.

Some democratically elected people are willing to damage the reconciliation efforts inherent in the Good Friday Agreement because of an argument about the number of times a flag flies over a building in Belfast.
identity insecurity
 

Eire1976

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I'm sure the usual ragtag bunch of morons will be along shortly to berate you for this thread but the answer you seek is 17 days.

SF and others agreed that the Union flag should be flown only on official days where it would be required and that's 17 days minimum.
 

euryalus

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I'm sure the usual ragtag bunch of morons will be along shortly to berate you for this thread but the answer you seek is 17 days.

SF and others agreed that the Union flag should be flown only on official days where it would be required and that's 17 days minimum.
Thank you for that clear and concise answer - it underlines my point that, in the headquarters of David Cameron's constituency, the Union flag is rarely seen and, on that basis, the flag protesters seem to be behaving in a totally unreasonable manner.
 

rainmaker

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Mar 26, 2012
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I went out for a (very rare) trip to the pub yesterday afternoon, having finished my tasks for the day, and got into a conversation about the Irish flag protests. We decided that, as the Union Flag is flown above Witney Town Hall for no more than about two days a year, we ought to start a "flag protest", with the aim of reaching an agreement whereby the national flag is flown for a set number of days per year -perhaps 30 days? As Witney is David Cameron's Parliamentary constituency the "Witney Flag Protest" would clearly accrue at least some coverage in the press.

This does, however, raise an interesting question - how many days per year will the Union Flag be flown over Belfast City Hall under the proposed compromise agreement with the nationalists; is it as much as 30 days per annum? And if, in a typical English town, the flag is not flown every day of the year, why should Belfast residents (or some of them) expect the flag to be flown every day?
Hmm, interesting questions - I actually haven't noticed how often our local authority fly the Union flag, and nor I doubt does anyone I know.

I suppose that speaks volumes in itself.
 

Boy M5

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Thank you for that clear and concise answer - it underlines my point that, in the headquarters of David Cameron's constituency, the Union flag is rarely seen and, on that basis, the flag protesters seem to be behaving in a totally unreasonable manner.
Did you hear Fran McNally's report or see the Phoenix? Its about E Belfast constituency, its about a disaffected Unionist underclass
 

sic transit

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Symbolism has always been an excessively central element of Irish/British relations. I can understand the flag protesters, even if to me it seems utterly unfounded. As commented earlier it is about identity and the flag is a kind of "blanky" for those who find themselves in a place where cultural identity can take on myriad forms and where they need a clear sign that they do indeed have one.
 

picador

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Feb 19, 2009
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Symbolism has always been an excessively central element of Irish/British relations. I can understand the flag protesters, even if to me it seems utterly unfounded. As commented earlier it is about identity and the flag is a kind of "blanky" for those who find themselves in a place where cultural identity can take on myriad forms.
Insecure colonial fascists egged on by a BNP splinter group called Britain First.
 

Eire1976

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Thank you for that clear and concise answer - it underlines my point that, in the headquarters of David Cameron's constituency, the Union flag is rarely seen and, on that basis, the flag protesters seem to be behaving in a totally unreasonable manner.
You're welcome.

It's a pity that there is rotten politics behind the protests, the people involved should not feel that their national identity hinges on the flying of a flag. What will they do with themselves after unity when no British flag will fly on any official building?
 

sic transit

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Insecure colonial fascists egged on by a BNP splinter group called Britain First.
Were they from another area you'd be calling them decent ordinary people.
 

Eire1976

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Did you hear Fran McNally's report or see the Phoenix? Its about E Belfast constituency, its about a disaffected Unionist underclass
LOL dissafected in what way compared to the dissafected in all other area's?
 

rainmaker

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You're welcome.

It's a pity that there is rotten politics behind the protests, the people involved should not feel that their national identity hinges on the flying of a flag. What will they do with themselves after unity when no British flag will fly on any official building?
Would you feel the same if Dublin decided that the tri colour could only fly on a certain number of days per year as a gesture to Unionists?
 

james toney

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From the official UK website.

"The Union Flag is flown on Government buildings on days marking the birthdays of members of the Royal Family, Commonwealth Day, Coronation Day, The Queen's official birthday, Remembrance Day and on the days of the State Opening and prorogation of Parliament."
 

picador

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Would you feel the same if Dublin decided that the tri colour could only fly on a certain number of days per year as a gesture to Unionists?
Short of national reunification, why would 'Dublin' make unilateral gestures to a bunch of British colonial fanatics?
 

picador

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From the official UK website.

"The Union Flag is flown on Government buildings on days marking the birthdays of members of the Royal Family, Commonwealth Day, Coronation Day, The Queen's official birthday, Remembrance Day and on the days of the State Opening and prorogation of Parliament."
Amazingly this is Belfast City Council's recently adopted flag policy - the same one unionists (and West Brits) are up in arms about.

I, like many Belfast nationalists, disagree with the new policy, but I'm not trying to wreck Christmas and destroy what's left of the economy.
 

euryalus

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Nov 2, 2009
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From the official UK website.

"The Union Flag is flown on Government buildings on days marking the birthdays of members of the Royal Family, Commonwealth Day, Coronation Day, The Queen's official birthday, Remembrance Day and on the days of the State Opening and prorogation of Parliament."
I suppose, techinically speaking, Belfast City Hall (and indeed town halls throughout the UK) are municipal buildings rather than a national government buildings?
 

picador

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Feb 19, 2009
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I suppose, techinically speaking, Belfast City Hall (and indeed town halls throughout the UK) are municipal buildings rather than a national government buildings?
That's why Belfast City Hall has its own flag policy. It's now the same as the one at Stormont, which unionists accepted long ago.
 

cinnte

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Jan 6, 2011
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Amazingly this is Belfast City Council's recently adopted flag policy - the same one unionists (and West Brits) are up in arms about.

I, like many Belfast nationalists, disagree with the new policy, but I'm not trying to wreck Christmas and destroy what's left of the economy.
maybe the Grinch is behind it all
 
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