France approves plan to strip foreign-born criminals of French nationality

pete2

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 12, 2009
Messages
1,302
Members of the lower house of parliament, the National Assembly, passed the measure after a first reading by 294 votes to 239..

The law would strip French nationality from foreigners who had acquired citizenship and who were convicted of violent crimes against police and other officials. This punishment currently applies only to terrorism charges.

It would also allow police to deport foreign nationals, including those from other European Union countries, for repeated acts of

  • theft,
  • aggressive begging or
  • for illegally occupying land..
The bill must be examined by a parliamentary commission before it can be voted into law.
France approves plan to strip foreign-born criminals of French nationality - Telegraph
Hmm whoever could this law be aimed at? Needless to say this is another one in the eye for the liberals.
 


Sync

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 27, 2009
Messages
28,887
Can't see an issue with the revocation of citizenship, not sure how the latter deportation of EU folks would work though.
 

euroboy

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 8, 2008
Messages
322
The ECJ has established a large body of case law concerning the explusion of EU citizens from other member states's. France must apply those legal tests before it can remove an EU citizen.

France might shout down the European Commission, but somehow I think the Court will be so easy.
 

slippy wicket

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 10, 2010
Messages
4,492
Well done france, i could think of a few degenerates in this country who could do with the same treatment.
 

Squire Allworthy

Well-known member
Joined
May 31, 2007
Messages
1,404
Pity there wasn't a way of banishing home grown serial and violent criminals. Banishment is a good concept.
 

redtoothclaw

Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2010
Messages
85
Great stuff.
I know a family who had a son killed by a Lithuanian who was driving dangerously.
The guy smirked in court like it was nothing.
A trip home after he serves his sentence would suit him just nicely.
 

McDave

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 10, 2008
Messages
13,520
This seems like a reasonable measure to take against:

- perpetrators of very serious crimes; and

- concerted and gratuitous acts against public order.
 

slippy wicket

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 10, 2010
Messages
4,492
Pity there wasn't a way of banishing home grown serial and violent criminals. Banishment is a good concept.
Banish them to Rockall, a la pinochet.:rolleyes::rolleyes:
Only kidding.
 

johntrenchard

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 7, 2009
Messages
991
Hmm whoever could this law be aimed at? Needless to say this is another one in the eye for the liberals.

In France, Prisons Filled With Muslims - washingtonpost.com

"About 60 to 70 percent of all inmates in the country's prison system are Muslim, according to Muslim leaders, sociologists and researchers, though Muslims make up only about 12 percent of the country's population."


I think it would be fair to say that France has a problem. A BIG problem.

Maybe they're acting now before a civil war breaks out.
 

johntrenchard

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 7, 2009
Messages
991
This seems like a reasonable measure to take against:

- perpetrators of very serious crimes; and

- concerted and gratuitous acts against public order.
Correct me if i'm wrong , but doesn't this date back to Roman times? Commit a serious crime - you'd lose your citizenship - which would result in you being "banished" (in modern parlance , "deported")

I see nothing wrong with the French position. If you have immigrated to France and commit crimes against French society, then its only reasonable that you should lose your citizenship , serve your time, and be kicked out of France.

There is nothing unreasonable about that. It's utter common sense.
 

johntrenchard

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 7, 2009
Messages
991
The ECJ has established a large body of case law concerning the explusion of EU citizens from other member states's. France must apply those legal tests before it can remove an EU citizen.

France might shout down the European Commission, but somehow I think the Court will be so easy.
France has the EU types by the balls. They can do whatever they like.
Simple as that really.
 

corelli

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
4,472
The ECJ has established a large body of case law concerning the explusion of EU citizens from other member states's. France must apply those legal tests before it can remove an EU citizen.

France might shout down the European Commission, but somehow I think the Court will be so easy.
Indeed, this "story" would seem more agitation than anything. Each and every member state of the union already have the capacity to expel union nationals. The ECJ have, in their case law, said this and indicated the parameters. It's generally for serious crime so I am not seeing how the "persistent begging" part will go down.
 

johntrenchard

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 7, 2009
Messages
991
Indeed, this "story" would seem more agitation than anything. Each and every member state of the union already have the capacity to expel union nationals. The ECJ have, in their case law, said this and indicated the parameters. It's generally for serious crime so I am not seeing how the "persistent begging" part will go down.
That is interesting - so the French are basically encapsulating previous ECJ case law into their own national law?

Good post. Thanks for bringing that to our attention.
 

euroboy

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 8, 2008
Messages
322
Under EU law, Member States can remove EU citizens(not their own) on the grounds of public health(strict WHO consideration, cant be because of a cold sore etc), public safety and public policy. ECJ rulings have set particular criteria that must be met when Member States use above mentioned grounds. These criteria are extremely tough.

In regard to the public safety and public policy grounds of explusion, using the language of the Court, there must be a threat that is REAL, GENINUE and IMMEDIATE. Merely having a previous or series of past convictions does not give the Member State the right to kick someone out, even if our gut instinct is to say send them home.

I'm not sure this French proposal is consistent with EU law, nor am I convinced that citizenship can be derived under international law from someone for committing crimes apart from treason. And then there is the EU dimension. Since EU citizenship is dependent on member state nationality, isn't there is an issue of discrimination when two French EU citizens(one native born, the other naturalised) have different levels of protection regarding that EU citizenship. One can have it taken away if they spit in the eyes of a police officer, while the native born French citizen can commit the same crime and retain EU citizenship.
 
Last edited:

kenneth

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 26, 2009
Messages
693
Not liking this. Really can't see how the french can justify punishing foreigners in a different manner to French people. Surely in a just and equal society everyone will be treated the same way regardless of their nationality?
 

Clanrickard

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 25, 2008
Messages
33,163
I'm not sure this French proposal is consistent with EU law, nor am I convinced that citizenship can be derived under international law from someone for committing crimes apart from treason. And then there is the EU dimension. Since EU citizenship is dependent on member state nationality, isn't there is an issue of discrimination when two French EU citizens(one native born, the other naturalised) have different levels of protection regarding that EU citizenship. One can have it taken away if they spit in the eyes of a police officer, while the native born French citizen can commit the same crime and retain EU citizenship.
EU law has no role in citizenship merely in the application of EU law to all EU citizens within the EU. It is up to the French to whom they give citizenship and from whom they take it away. If the person has citizenship of another EU nation then the ECJ could step in. I think it is more about Algerian and North Africans of a certain religion and if they are stripped of citizenship they can be booted out. Good job too.
 

Clanrickard

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 25, 2008
Messages
33,163
Not liking this. Really can't see how the french can justify punishing foreigners in a different manner to French people. Surely in a just and equal society everyone will be treated the same way regardless of their nationality?
If Islamic fundamentalists won't integrate and want to cause trouble they should be kicked out. France is not responsible for the social problems of islamic countries.
 

bob3344

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 5, 2007
Messages
7,021
Once again France shows the way. First the burqa, then the Roma, now this.

Why should a country have to put up with hostile foreign elements who hate everything europe stands for ?

Misplaced sense of guilt ?

It simply is not up to us to try and civilise these people.
 

kenneth

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 26, 2009
Messages
693
If Islamic fundamentalists won't integrate and want to cause trouble they should be kicked out. France is not responsible for the social problems of islamic countries.


Judging by stats put up on this thread earlier France already punishes it's Muslim criminals adequately by throwing bucket loads of them in prison. They should not be subjected to the additional punishment of having their citizenship stripped of them and being consequently deported just because of their religion. And of all the north Africans living in France pose any threat to the security of the state. The only "threat" posed by islamists in France in recent memory was the bomb scare at the Eiffel tower. Dissident republicans pose more of a threat in the north do than muslims do in France.
 


New Threads

Most Replies

Top