France nears boiling-point as three million take to streets

Scipio

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The French are idiots, perpetual undergraduates who won't grow up and think the rest of the world owes them a living.
Confine that sort of blanket judgement to the SNCF drivers and those in the Arts faculties.

A great many French people understand that this reform is necessary, and support it.

Dissatisfaction with Sarkozy, and a move by the unions to keep their power base, which has been steadily eroding for years, is pushing this, though it will fail, or the French pension system will simply go bust.

You live longer, you work longer - simple as.
 


The Caped Cod

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I'm too busy working. What do you want me to do, drive a truck into the gates of the Dail? (I could understand his anger but it doesn't achieve anything)

Joining a political party is a good idea, maybe I'll think of doing that. The French are idiots, perpetual undergraduates who won't grow up and think the rest of the world owes them a living.
That most be why Ireland is a Utopia, where your vision of laisser faire politics rules, and France is a country about to make a sovereign default or strip it's citizens of every benefit while lumping them with high taxes and generations of debt repayment :rolleyes:

Oh wait...
 

The Caped Cod

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Confine that sort of blanket judgement to the SNCF drivers and those in the Arts faculties.

A great many French people understand that this reform is necessary, and support it.

Dissatisfaction with Sarkozy, and a move by the unions to keep their power base, which has been steadily eroding for years, is pushing this, though it will fail, or the French pension system will simply go bust.

You live longer, you work longer - simple as.
That must be why 71% of French people are aparently behind the strikes and demonsttrations.

71% des Français favorables à la journée de mobilisation sur les retraites
http://www.lepoint.fr/societe/71-de...n-sur-les-retraites-09-10-2010-1247086_23.php
 

Scipio

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That must be why 71% of French people are aparently behind the strikes and demonsttrations.
I'd say 29 per cent of the French population constitutes a great many people, wouldn't you?

If you ask people with a grounding in economics (and logic), and not outdated left-wing ideologues who believe state will continue to pay for you even when it's 30 billion euro in the red, I'd bet the percentage rises even higher.
 

SeanieFitz

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"irish people do what they are told"

i couldn't agree more, we will be good little europeans for our ECB masters and tip our cap to the politicans and bankers that got us in to this mess. the french know how to protest, i am not saying it will work but at least it will show that they won't bend over and take it up the a!s like the good little irish worker!
 

White Rose

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That most be why Ireland is a Utopia, where your vision of laisser faire politics rules, and France is a country about to make a sovereign default or strip it's citizens of every benefit while lumping them with high taxes and generations of debt repayment :rolleyes:

Oh wait...
I'd much prefer Ireland to France thank you very much. Utopia doesn't exist (except in the minds of communists)
 

The Caped Cod

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I'd say 29 per cent of the French population constitutes a great many people, wouldn't you?

If you ask people with a grounding in economics (and logic), and not outdated left-wing ideologues who believe state will continue to pay for you even when it's 30 billion euro in the red, I'd bet the percentage rises even higher.
Then perhaps that 29% would like to have a closer look at the bouclier fiscal? Or maybe they make up some of the 1 in 11 millionaires that are French. Or perhjaps they'd like to know that, just as one example, Société Generale who claimed that Kervel lost them over €4 billion as a "rogue trader" (even thoug h they commended him on the rouge trading that had been very profitable) were given a tax break of over €1 billion to offset the loss they incurred, according to their testimony, not supervisin gthe activities of their employees. Or how about the great "reearch" tax fiddle that means big corporations end up paying 3-4% tax after their "research" rebates while the small to medium limited compnay pays 33%.
 

The Caped Cod

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I'd much prefer Ireland to France thank you very much. Utopia doesn't exist (except in the minds of communists)
And nothing at all exists in your mind. Did voting in the last general election and then sticking your head in the sand as Berite and the boys went to play work out well for you last time?

Have you ever actually been to France?
 

Cassandra Syndrome

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We elect a government to pass laws, it's called democracy. Even if I don't like the laws, i accept them. Then there is a general election and you change the government if you're not happy

In France they elect a government and then try to close down the country every time they don't like a law- this is the first step to fascism
:p

You call this a democracy? Its a dictatorship, you fool!
 

Scipio

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Then perhaps that 29% would like to have a closer look at the bouclier fiscal? Or maybe they make up some of the 1 in 11 millionaires that are French. Or perhjaps they'd like to know that, just as one example, Société Generale who claimed that Kervel lost them over €4 billion as a "rogue trader" (even thoug h they commended him on the rouge trading that had been very profitable) were given a tax break of over €1 billion to offset the loss they incurred, according to their testimony, not supervisin gthe activities of their employees. Or how about the great "reearch" tax fiddle that means big corporations end up paying 3-4% tax after their "research" rebates while the small to medium limited compnay pays 33%.
This is the typical left-wing propaganda trotted out every time the figures are presented.

France has three choices at the moment:

(i) Continue as is, in which case the pension system will bankrupt itself.
(ii) Amend the system by obliging people to work longer (and 62 hardly seems unfair when our neighbours over the Rhine work until 67), and enable a pension system for a people who are living longer to pay for itself (on average, the French live 3 months longer each year)
(iii) Get rid of the public pension system as it is, and move to a private option.

Those are the stark facts, and however long the CGT, Besancenot and students studying les arts plastiques rant about evil capitalists won't change it.
 

niropiro

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This is the typical left-wing propaganda trotted out every time the figures are presented.

France has three choices at the moment:

(i) Continue as is, in which case the pension system will bankrupt itself.
(ii) Amend the system by obliging people to work longer (and 62 hardly seems unfair when our neighbours over the Rhine work until 67), and enable a pension system for a people who are living longer to pay for itself (on average, the French live 3 months longer each year)
(iii) Get rid of the public pension system as it is, and move to a private option.

Those are the stark facts, and however long the CGT, Besancenot and students studying les arts plastiques rant about evil capitalists won't change it.
Precisely.
 

barrym

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May 4, 2004
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This is the typical left-wing propaganda trotted out every time the figures are presented.

France has three choices at the moment:

(i) Continue as is, in which case the pension system will bankrupt itself.
(ii) Amend the system by obliging people to work longer (and 62 hardly seems unfair when our neighbours over the Rhine work until 67), and enable a pension system for a people who are living longer to pay for itself (on average, the French live 3 months longer each year)
(iii) Get rid of the public pension system as it is, and move to a private option.

Those are the stark facts, and however long the CGT, Besancenot and students studying les arts plastiques rant about evil capitalists won't change it.
I mentioned way back on this thread that this whole thing is part of a longer term issue with Sarko and his policies. At the time of his election he promised the moon and stars to an audience who were extremely disappointed with a)Chirac and b) the possible Left alternatives and they thought Sarko was a 'different' one.... they now realise they were wrong. (A bit like the Irish) they have put up with what went on but now they are really pissed off and the pensions thing and Sarko's attitude to fixing it. So, they are in the streets, etc., not agin the pensions per se, most people know they need to change it, but (unlike the Irish) to warn the pols that they are getting antsy. If we had been in the streets a year ago we wouldn't now be getting drip fed the details, is it 3 4 or 5 bn€???

As I said before, in a country where they already had the revolution (it may have been 220 years ago but it still matters) they go in the streets to keep the pols in their places. It works, they'll pass the pensions stuff, but they'll be wary for the next few years, there's a pres election in 2012.....

Now, isn't it time we got in the streets (I'll be on the first non strikebound flight I can find ;) ) and warn them all we are pissed off???

Barry

P.S. I mentioned before, you cannot compare France and Ireland on any basis of economics. France is and was rich in that the economy is 'old' and the infrastructure etc., is in place, we aren't nearly there yet.
 

Trampas

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It would appear that those "youths of North African origin" have seized their opportunity for another round of car-burnings.
 


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