GAA thinking of dropping flag and anthem?

Fr. Hank Tree

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GAA may reconsider use of tricolour and Irish national anthem - The Irish News

THE GAA may reconsider its use of the tricolour and Irish national anthem, the association's president has said.

Aogán Ó Fearghaíl said the flag and anthem "mean a lot to the GAA and will continue to do so", adding: "but who knows in the future?"

He accepted the Irish brand, with particular reference to the tricolour and Amhrán na bhFiann, "causes more difficulty.. at home" – meaning largely in Northern Ireland.
I can understand the rationale of doing this in foreign countries. But doing this in Ireland would strike me as being inclusive for its own sake, even when that means forgetting your own origins and heritage. Unionists are on the wrong side of history, why bend over to accommodate their outmoded sensibilities?

Seems to me as well that the GAA has been making a lot of concessions and sellouts recently. Is HQ losing the plot?
 
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PeaceGoalie

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Croke Park Should Be Renamed Halawa Park

Croke Park is currently named after an Islamophobic bigot. ASs Ireland is not doing enough for Ibrahim Halawas because his name is not Biddy or Mary, Croke Park should be immediately renamed Halawa Park and Panti Bliss should cut the ribbon on it.
 

silverharp

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Croke Park is currently named after an Islamophobic bigot. ASs Ireland is not doing enough for Ibrahim Halawas because his name is not Biddy or Mary, Croke Park should be immediately renamed Halawa Park and Panti Bliss should cut the ribbon on it.
sounds good, maybe have the Queen as a patron? as SF said before" we'll break the bastards with equality!"
 

Vega1447

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In fact, ..

Ó Fearghaíl said that any such breaks with tradition would only come in an "agreed Ireland".
"In the future, if there are different agreements in place for the whole of Ireland, of course the GAA would be inclusive in that," he said.
 

Trainwreck

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GAA may reconsider use of tricolour and Irish national anthem - The Irish News



I can understand the rationale of doing this in foreign countries. But doing this in Ireland would strike me as being inclusive for its own sake, even when that means forgetting your own origins and heritage. Unionists are on the wrong side of history, why bend over to accommodate their outmoded sensibilities?

Seems to me as well that the GAA has been making a lot of concessions and sellouts recently. Is HQ losing the plot?

It is long past time when the GAA needs to decide explicitly whether it wants to be a sporting organisation or a political/social one.
 

runwiththewind

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It is long past time when the GAA needs to decide explicitly whether it wants to be a sporting organisation or a political/social one.
Name a sporting organisation either at home or abroad that doesn't use their country's flag and anthem?
 

Hibee

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They always like to fly a notional kite on the All stars tours. Another thing of nothing .
 

PeaceGoalie

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Myles na gCopaleen once wrote a skit about Pope Brendan 1, who returns to Ireland to throw in the ball at the All Ireland where his brother, also Brendan, captains the Kerry team and scores the cracking winning goal, which causes Pope Francis to die of a heart attack.
 

Fr. Hank Tree

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They always like to fly a notional kite on the All stars tours. Another thing of nothing .
It's not just trivial kite flying. We know the trajectory that the GAA has been on, and now the president is setting out his vision for the future.

His vision is premised on a few key ideas:
- the national flag and anthem belong to the past
- "inclusivity", I.e. accommodation of unionist sensibilities to the nth degree represents the future.
- Sport and politics must be separate
- history doesn't really matter

None of this is inevitable yet the president implies that it is. The tricolous and amhráin na bhfiann represent as much of the future as his relativistic lifeless notion of progress/reconciliation does.
 

Vega1447

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It's not just trivial kite flying. We know the trajectory that the GAA has been on, and now the president is setting out his vision for the future.

His vision is premised on a few key ideas:
- the national flag and anthem belong to the past
- "inclusivity", I.e. accommodation of unionist sensibilities to the nth degree represents the future.
- Sport and politics must be separate
- history doesn't really matter

None of this is inevitable yet the president implies that it is. The tricolous and amhráin na bhfiann represent as much of the future as his life-negating notion of progress/reconciliation does.
Ó Fearghaíl said that any such breaks with tradition would only come in an "agreed Ireland".
"In the future, if there are different agreements in place for the whole of Ireland, of course the GAA would be inclusive in that," he said.
 

Fr. Hank Tree

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What's your point? Second time you've posted that quote and I still don't know.

Why would an agreed Ireland necessarily mean the end of the tricolour or anthem? He's basically saying now what the future will ultimately be in his view.

I say that we could have an agreed inclusive Ireland that's still nationalist and republican.
 

Man or Mouse

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GAA may reconsider use of tricolour and Irish national anthem - The Irish News



I can understand the rationale of doing this in foreign countries. But doing this in Ireland would strike me as being inclusive for its own sake, even when that means forgetting your own origins and heritage. Unionists are on the wrong side of history, why bend over to accommodate their outmoded sensibilities?

Seems to me as well that the GAA has been making a lot of concessions and sellouts recently. Is HQ losing the plot?
Would this have anything to do with possibly hosting the 2023 RWC I wonder? It is not being hosted by the ROI, nor indeed the British government, but by two all Ireland sports bodies whose anthem is not, nor cannot be Amhrán na bhFiann.

So, if Ireland - the 32 county team - got to the final, what would be their anthem? The anthem of Irish Rugby on foreign soil is now Irelands Call.

By the way, I was surrounded by people from NI the other night at the Australia game and they were really belting it out, like it really meant something to them.
 

runwiththewind

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At every game?
Isn't that the business of the GAA though.

I'd have no objection to dropping the anthem generally but not for big finals.

It was afterall, the GAA that was the first to give recognition to both the flag and anthem. So much so that they became official.
 

runwiththewind

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That is true. But it gets grey when they take peace and love funding in the 6
Why? GAA members are taxpayers too.
 

PBP voter

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They should just play it at All-Ireland finals(all grades of course).

It would make it more special.
 

The_SR

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It's not just trivial kite flying. We know the trajectory that the GAA has been on, and now the president is setting out his vision for the future.

His vision is premised on a few key ideas:
- the national flag and anthem belong to the past
- "inclusivity", I.e. accommodation of unionist sensibilities to the nth degree represents the future.
- Sport and politics must be separate
- history doesn't really matter

None of this is inevitable yet the president implies that it is. The tricolous and amhráin na bhfiann represent as much of the future as his relativistic lifeless notion of progress/reconciliation does.
All that is fine and dandy, but once the gaa made a commitment to be inclusiv in the 6 what did you expect?

As has been said before, does the gaa need to be primarily a cultural nationalist movement in 2016?
 

Vega1447

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What's your point? Second time you've posted that quote and I still don't know.

Why would an agreed Ireland necessarily mean the end of the tricolour or anthem? He's basically saying now what the future will ultimately be in his view.

I say that we could have an agreed inclusive Ireland that's still nationalist and republican.
I suppose that the key is the word 'agreed'. A United Ireland would prob need some unifying symbols like flegs (sic) and anthems.
 


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