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Gaeltacht Quarter for Dublin city


Fallen_Angel

Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2005
Messages
33
I just had a brilliant idea.

In the 1920's the then Irish government had the vision and foresight to relocate a whole irish-speaking village from Connemara to Ráth Cairn in Co. Meath. And Ráth Cairn is now the only Gaeltacht in Leinster.

The future of the Irish language needs some of this vision and foresight again.

How about creating a small Gaeltacht in Dublin city. It would be similar to a proposed Chinatown in Parnell Street East.

If we put an Irish language cultural centre at the heart of this new community as well as the offices for Conradh na Gaeilge, Gaelinn and obviously a Welcome centre where people can come speak Irish.

We could put in a café, restaurant, supermarket, bakery, all of which could have bilingual Irish-English speaking staff.

We could even bring in kids from Connemara to work in the supermarkets, get bilingual managers to run the establishments.

Something like a Gaeltacht Quarter would bring in huge revenue.

Think about all the American tourists browsing the shops, they would love it.

If we can have a Chinatown why can't we have a Gaeltacht Quarter.



:D
 

TheBear

Active member
Joined
May 25, 2004
Messages
234
<Mod>Moved to the Dublin forum.</Mod>
 

Decko

Active member
Joined
Jun 17, 2004
Messages
232
excellent idea.... we need Irish to be seen as flourishing in urban areas ... we could learn from the Welsh in this regard
 

Fallen_Angel

Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2005
Messages
33
I just sent a letter to Foras na Gaeilge regarding my idea.

@JCSkinner: if memory serves me right, NI doesn't have dollars it has pounds.
And NI taxes don't go to the Republic.
 

DJP

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
12,278
I'm afraid Fallen_Angel I have raised this issue before.

If we are serious about promoting Irish we should be happy to set up new gaeltachtaí. It's not the most important issue but I would put it as the third most important issue that is not even being faced by the government.
 

alonso

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2006
Messages
2,573
FA I think it's worth pursuing. Perhaps flesh it out here a bit more. Would it be commercial only or would you want Irish speaking residents. Location? Perhaps the ongoing Docklands development could cater for it, or the Markets renewal. Or looking long term, James' Gate - it will already have it's massive tourist draw and the redevelopment of the site would be ideal for this - close to the Kilmainham Gaol and the Museum etc

my own opinion is that to look for Irish speaking residents is beyond a diverse urban area like Dublin but if one was to insist on Irish speaking retailers etc and Irish language only signposts etc it could work.

However a "Tír na Disné" effect would have to be avoided and the fear would be that the national tongue would become a tacky trinket causing it further damage. But it's worth debating definitely
 

Fallen_Angel

Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2005
Messages
33
alonso said:
Would it be commercial only or would you want Irish speaking residents. Location?
Well if you put the offices for Conradh na Gaeilge, Gaelinn and the Ionad Buail Isteach into the Gaeltacht Quarter it would help create the necessary critical mass for it to work.
The quarter would be overwhelmingly commercial, who's to say there couldn't be a guesthouse/hotel maybe.
There could be a cultural centre centre where people could learn and speak Irish.

alonso said:
my own opinion is that to look for Irish speaking residents is beyond a diverse urban area like Dublin but if one was to insist on Irish speaking retailers etc and Irish language only signposts etc it could work.
There are nearly 10 Irish speaking secondary schools in Dublin, maybe some of the kids from these schools could be given part time jobs(as part of Transition Year) in the shops in the Gaeltacht Quarter.

alonso said:
However a "Tír na Disné" effect would have to be avoided and the fear would be that the national tongue would become a tacky trinket causing it further damage. But it's worth debating definitely
I would definitely be against a Tír na Disné, as it would only make a mockery of the language.
 

JCSkinner

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Joined
Feb 17, 2005
Messages
1,250
Website
skinflicks.blogspot.com
Fallen_Angel said:
I just sent a letter to Foras na Gaeilge regarding my idea.

@JCSkinner: if memory serves me right, NI doesn't have dollars it has pounds.
And NI taxes don't go to the Republic.
@Fallen Angel, I pay taxes in both jurisdictions, and would object to taxes from either going towards this white elephant.
There's nothing stopping people getting together with a developer to create this in the private sector.
Go ask Sean Dunne. Quit with the begging bowl to the state.
 

Fir Bolg

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
830
JCSkinner said:
Do whatever floats your boat. Just do not ask for my tax dollars to do it with, thanks.
I don't want my "tax dollars" being used to fund places like the Hugh Lane gallery and various other "projects" around the country, but I do respect the fact that other people have different views from me and are entitled to some help from the government to pursue something that others may benefit from.
 

DJP

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
12,278
My own view is that Dublin should have a Gaeltacht Quarter like Belfast- but only if Dublin City Council goes down the road of having different quarters in Dublin.

A national survey should be carried out by the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs to see how many people would want to live in a new gaeltacht. Say if, for example, only two thousand people decided that they wanted to then only two thousand houses/apartments should be built. It wouldn't be a question of the Government marketing to get people to live in new gaeltachtaí but mererly a question of building new developments for Irish speakers on the basis of demand. It doesn't sound unfair to me.
 

JCSkinner

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Feb 17, 2005
Messages
1,250
Website
skinflicks.blogspot.com
Fir Bolg said:
JCSkinner said:
Do whatever floats your boat. Just do not ask for my tax dollars to do it with, thanks.
I don't want my "tax dollars" being used to fund places like the Hugh Lane gallery and various other "projects" around the country, but I do respect the fact that other people have different views from me and are entitled to some help from the government to pursue something that others may benefit from.
You'll have my support if you locate your gaeltacht quarter in Finglas.

http://skinflicks.blogspot.com/2008/03/ ... nglas.html
 

Fallen_Angel

Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2005
Messages
33
JCSkinner said:
@Fallen Angel, I pay taxes in both jurisdictions, and would object to taxes from either going towards this white elephant.
There's nothing stopping people getting together with a developer to create this in the private sector.
Go ask Sean Dunne. Quit with the begging bowl to the state.
Before TG4 was created, Journalist Kevin Meyers said that creating an Irish speaking television station in the south was a big white elephant.

10 years later, TG4 has tripled it's audience share with 750,000 people tuning into the station each day.

TG4 is now independent of RTE, and is much more efficently run than RTE. with a budget of only 30m.

Not to mention the fact that TG4 has also been one of the reasons why the British government agreed to fund a Scottish Gaelic Television Service.

If you want to talk about white elephants then maybe you should talk about RTE.

Nothing ventured nothing gained !!! :D :lol:
 

JCSkinner

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2005
Messages
1,250
Website
skinflicks.blogspot.com
Fallen_Angel said:
JCSkinner said:
@Fallen Angel, I pay taxes in both jurisdictions, and would object to taxes from either going towards this white elephant.
There's nothing stopping people getting together with a developer to create this in the private sector.
Go ask Sean Dunne. Quit with the begging bowl to the state.
Before TG4 was created, Journalist Kevin Meyers said that creating an Irish speaking television station in the south was a big white elephant.

10 years later, TG4 has tripled it's audience share with 750,000 people tuning into the station each day.

TG4 is now independent of RTE, and is much more efficently run than RTE.

If you want to talk about white elephants then maybe you should talk about RTE.

Nothing ventured nothing gained !!! :D :lol:
Oh, believe me I've little time for RTE and their anti-competitive licence fee.
I believe I have indeed talked about them in the past here:
http://skinflicks.blogspot.com/2008/01/ ... ghing.html
and most importantly here:
http://skinflicks.blogspot.com/2007/06/ ... s-now.html
 

Bom

Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2008
Messages
54
I

I dont think anyone's tax dollars should go toward a project like this; look how language suffered in Fallujah!
 

BuachaillBeo

Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2007
Messages
66
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
I'd personally rather see a young persons radio station- a 2FM i nGaeilge- and statutory naming committees at council level to name new residential developments before the setting up of new gaeltachtaí. The issue is third on my list.
Why would having places named after Irish names take precedence over having a significantly placed area where Irish would be the spoken language? :?
 
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