Galway partnership secures Royal Astronomical Society Award.

Munnkeyman

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Some good news for science and public outreach in Galway. The Royal Astronomical Society (RAS), under their RAS200 scheme which celebrates the bicentenary of the RAS, have awarded funding towards scientific public engagement in Galway. This award will be concurrent with Galway's nomination as European Capital of Culture 2020

This is a collaborative effort between NUI Galway, Galway City Museum, Galway Arts Centre and Croí na Gaillimhe and will really help to foster new and innovative cross-disciplinary approaches to public engagement between scientists, artists and the public.


See here for more information -
May 2017 - NUI Galway

Developments such as an Outdoor Planetarium Exhibition at the City Museum and a Planetary Walk that stretches from the Galway Prom into the Spanish Arch and up river to the University, will be complemented by an education programme aimed at primary schools, early school leavers and children and adults in direct provision. Residencies and collaborations between artists and scientists will take place, creating new research and artworks with schools and the public. A new music piece will also be commissioned.

Speaking of the award, Professor Shearer said: “With our RAS 200 project we want to address creativity and innovation for artists and scientists by showing that the astronomical sciences can stimulate artistic projects and ventures. We want this to be a two-way process hereby we can also, as astronomers, learn different ways of communicating our science to different audiences.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHETysYhL5U
 


Mushroom

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Some good news for science and public outreach in Galway. The Royal Astronomical Society (RAS), under their RAS200 scheme which celebrates the bicentenary of the RAS, have awarded funding towards scientific public engagement in Galway. This award will be concurrent with Galway's nomination as European Capital of Culture 2020

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHETysYhL5U
Good news indeed - well done NUIG.

I note that your posted extract included the statement: "...Residencies and collaborations between artists and scientists will take place, creating new research and artworks with schools and the public. A new music piece will also be commissioned."

Surely this offers a golden opportunity for a renowned NUIG alumnus who has moved on to greater things to compose a special poem for the event! So arise Uachtarán MickeyDee and take up thy trusty peann luaidhe!
 

Munnkeyman

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Good news indeed - well done NUIG.

I note that your posted extract included the statement: "...Residencies and collaborations between artists and scientists will take place, creating new research and artworks with schools and the public. A new music piece will also be commissioned."

Surely this offers a golden opportunity for a renowned NUIG alumnus who has moved on to greater things to compose a special poem for the event! So arise Uachtarán MickeyDee and take up thy trusty peann luaidhe!

I'm sure that all promotion of scientific outreach and public engagement would be most welcome. It's very much needed worldwide.
 

Mushroom

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I'm sure that all promotion of scientific outreach and public engagement would be most welcome. It's very much needed worldwide.
It sure is!

Even in the brief period since I started studying astronomy, Pluto has been kicked off the list of planets before being re-admitted together with two new "dwarf planets".

And the number of "moons" around the so-called "giant planets" has gone off the radar. Between them, Jupiter, Uranus, Saturn and Neptune currently have about 170 moons - some of them being about the size of a peanut.

This kind of thing is very unfair to table quiz enthusiasts like your truly.
 

Munnkeyman

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It sure is!

Even in the brief period since I started studying astronomy, Pluto has been kicked off the list of planets before being re-admitted together with two new "dwarf planets".

And the number of "moons" around the so-called "giant planets" has gone off the radar. Between them, Jupiter, Uranus, Saturn and Neptune currently have about 170 moons - some of them being about the size of a peanut.

This kind of thing is very unfair to table quiz enthusiasts like your truly.

It really is hard to keep pace with discoveries. Scientists really do learn a huge amount of information from outreach events and it really does help to keep them sharp and more up to date - researchers are sometimes guilty of a bit of over-focus on their niche (most typically) area of research. These types of awards are really beneficial in that respect, as it is amazing how knowledgeable people of all ages are about different areas of science! It is a two-way street, scientists inform the public and the public also do the same in return!
 

cricket

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Anybody involved with a body with the word "Royal" in its title is only asking to be described as a west brit by the usual suspects around here. It must not waking up time in Florida yet.
 

Sister Mercedes

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Why does Galway use a science award as an excuse to commission artistic work. Why not commission more science stuff?
 

Munnkeyman

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Why does Galway use a science award as an excuse to commission artistic work. Why not commission more science stuff?
See here (in bold).


https://www.ras.org.uk/news-and-press/2986-ras-funds-five-public-engagement-projects-to-mark-200th-anniversary
In 2020 the RAS will be 200 years old. To celebrate its bicentennial, the Society established RAS 200: Sky & Earth, an Outreach and Engagement Fund of £1,000,000 to support astronomy and geophysics projects that create a real buzz about science – understanding, discussion and dialogue – in diverse sections of the community.
 

Mushroom

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Good news. Heard this fella on the radio last week

Midland Tribune - News - Radio Telescope Arrives In Birr

Continuing Birr's tradition as a centre of scientific excellence ;)
You've gotta admire the Midland Tribune's focus on the local aspect:

"This exciting project could mean the creation of more jobs in Birr and a great broadband service for the town's businesses."

What are the odds that any day now they'll be looking for a third level college!
 

Munnkeyman

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You've gotta admire the Midland Tribune's focus on the local aspect:

"This exciting project could mean the creation of more jobs in Birr and a great broadband service for the town's businesses."

What are the odds that any day now they'll be looking for a third level college!
There will be a very fast fibre link installed, which will mean high speed internet in the Midlands.

The national programme is expected to include funding and an update on the planned new LOFAR telescope in Birr, which would make broadband speeds of 10GB per second available across the Midlands. The only other area of the country that has the same broadband capability is around the M50 in Dublin.
Offaly Independent - Significant announcement on the way for Birr

 

eoghanacht

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You've gotta admire the Midland Tribune's focus on the local aspect:

"This exciting project could mean the creation of more jobs in Birr and a great broadband service for the town's businesses."

What are the odds that any day now they'll be looking for a third level college!
Well sher they have to travel to far flung places like Athlone ,Galway or worse Limerick why shouldn't they get it and once FF regain their birthright won't the Cowan dynasty see that they get it.

Up ye boya!
 

PeacefulViking

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Why does Galway use a science award as an excuse to commission artistic work. Why not commission more science stuff?
Let us hope that artistic work contains some actual scientific content at least, and not just some vague inspiration.
 

GDPR

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This is a good idea. I remember ages ago when Ian McEwans "The Child In Time" won the Whitbread Award, he said something to the effect that contemporary writers could benefit from having a better scientific education as a source to draw on and not leave it all up to niche "sci-fi" writers.

The Child In Time works on various levels - it is a story about the terrible emotional consequences of a child going missing, but it also incorporates the theory that time is relative, and can be fluid and unstructured. This isnt done in a whoo-whoo Dr Who way but brilliantly integrated into the novels events, and the arc of the plot. He spent a lot of time hanging out with physicists around the time he got the idea.

Another example would be Michael Frayns play Copenhagen, which deals with the historical question of how far Heisenberg actively colluded with the Nazi, and uses his own theory to frame the plot in such a way that it is an imaginative demonstration of the Uncertainity Principle. Its totally brain-stretching and gripping.
 

GDPR

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There is also Tom Stoppards "Arcadia" which I regard as the greatest modern play of our age, and was named by the Royal Institute of Great Britain as one of the best science-related works ever written.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arcadia_(play)

The value of a creative artist who actually understands the scientific concepts they are exploring, and can show them not merely discuss them, in a context which is inherently interesting (human relations etc) is immense. I suffered from only having biology as a science and having a very weak grasp of maths, but became absorbed and fascinated by the scientific ideas I saw embodied on stage etc. I am sure this would be true of many "artie" types.
 

Munnkeyman

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That's the real issue quite a few scientists have and are quite willing to admit they have - trying to explain an idea\concept\theory they have to as many people as they possibly can. There is that always misquoted and most likely apocryphal quote from Einstein to de Broglie - "that all physical theories, their mathematical expressions apart ought to lend themselves to so simple a description 'that even a child could understand them.'"
But it's also more than that - it's really important to not just limit the audience to those in formal education - because that really is just exclusive.

It's good to see that quite a few professional bodies in science are rewarding excellence
in public outreach with awards and recognition, as scientific research is almost pointless
if it's kept in an echo chamber. Conferences invariably now have a not-so-insignificant session, in terms of time, devoted to public engagement and outreach and some of these sessions are exceptionally interesting.
 

stopdoingstuff

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As previously pointed out this contains the word Royal, which means it may be a covert attempt to promote Protestantism. It also refers to matters Astronomical and it is provided by a Society, which indicates the possible involvement of both heretics and communists. On the other hand it is in Galway, and since we know from history that the province in question is only marginally better than hell, the damage will be slight.
 

Mitsui2

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That's the real issue quite a few scientists have and are quite willing to admit they have - trying to explain an idea\concept\theory they have to as many people as they possibly can.
This is one reason why I'm a big fan of the BBCs 'Horizon' series - because (at least at its best) it can explain some very abstruse scientific theories in terms that even I can understand.
 


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