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Gasland - The problems with Gas Fracking


PAD1OH

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[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZe1AeH0Qz8&feature=player_embedded#]YouTube - ‪GASLAND Trailer 2010‬‎[/ame]!



i wonder when the irish release date is?
 


truthforsooth

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Funny (not haha) - the guy at around 1.35 on youtube video asking "If you weren't able to do this hydraulic fracturing how much more would we be dependent on foreign oil...and terrorism?"
 

termcg

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The map at 2:05 shows fracturing in Europe and even the UK. I can guarantee fracturing is not being carried out in Europe and current thought is that it may only be feasible in Poland.

I hope that doesn't take from the documentary though ask I do think the impacts should be investigated.
 

truthforsooth

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The map at 2:05 shows fracturing in Europe and even the UK. I can guarantee fracturing is not being carried out in Europe and current thought is that it may only be feasible in Poland.
Thanks for this information. Do you know if the Weald Basin in southern England is being worked, and if so how is the gas being extracted? I also read somewhere a mention of exploration in shale beds in the north of Ireland.
Unfortunately, I don't know much (yet) about the technology used, or its impacts - this is a whole new field to me.
 

termcg

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As far as I know there are no offshore gas fracturing sites in the world and the map in the video collaborates this, all the sites are on land. The other thing is gas fracturing has been going on for decades, its horizontal gas fracturing that relatively new. Maybe his map is all of the gas fracturing sites and not just the controversial kind? The Weald Basin is off shore and so would be conventional exploration. This technology is still relatively new and so still requires a first of a kind premium in the states. That premium would be much larger in Europe as it hasn't been deployed here at all yet.

The reason shale gas has been a game charger is because while it is more expensive than conventional exploration in the states it is cheaper and more secure than imported LNG. That means there is now a glut of LNG on the international market which can be sold to Europe which is driving down the price of Russian gas and delinking the gas and oil prices. The credit crunch also had an effect.

Im sorry I am not aware of any gas exploration around the north but I am more interested in the gas than the exploration. Given the suppressed prices at the moment and all the projections in the medium term aren't wonderful for producers I cant see anyone developing and financing a small gas field on the western tip of Europe. The British government would really need to get behind it for security of supply reasons and they are focused on the nuclear and renewable debate at the moment.

I am not trying to debunk gas land, I am just trying to provoke debate so have a look at this link Energy in Depth

My own personal opinion is you cannot pump high pressure water and even low concentration of chemicals into the ground and water table and not expect some issues.
 

junius

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Providence Resources to begin test-drilling for oil off Dalkey Island - The Irish Times - Fri, Apr 09, 2010
Providence Resources to begin test-drilling for oil off Dalkey Island

BARRY O'HALLORAN

EXPLORATION GROUP Providence Resources is set to begin drilling for oil off Dalkey Island in Co Dublin.

The company yesterday issued a statement saying that initial soundings taken in a exploration licence area in the Kish Bank in the Irish Sea, known as the Dalkey Island prospect, indicate that it has the potential to produce oil.

The block covers a large area in the Irish Sea, but its western edge lies off Dalkey, one of Dublin’s swishest neighbourhoods and home to a number of celebrities, including some members of rock group U2.

However, Providence chief executive Tony O’Reilly jnr said yesterday that any activity would be offshore, and added that it would be unlikely to prompt complaints from Bono.

“It is well offshore,” he said, “but the advantage is that it is in very shallow water, there is nothing like the depth that you get in blocks like Dunquin or Spanish Point” (which are both off the west coast).

Drilling is not likely to begin there for some time. Providence, and its 50 per cent partner in the block, Petronas, initially intend to run seismic tests, which will provide a picture of the area’s geology. This should provide the main clues to the whereabouts of oil or natural gas.

Based on that, it will then begin exploratory drilling, which is simply a series of drilling exercises aimed at establishing if the area holds oil and if so, how much.

Drilling for oil in shallow water is cheaper and safer than in deep water, where Providence is used to working, as it has interests all around the Irish coast.

Mr O’Reilly could not say how long it would take before it begins this part of the project. “I could not say within months at this stage, we will have to see after we’ve done the seismic.”

Over the years, drilling close to the area has encountered some oil and some natural gas, although nothing that was considered commercial.

However, the key feature of the block as far as Providence is concerned is its similarity to Morecambe Bay.

That area is directly across the Irish Sea, close to Liverpool, and is home to a number of prolific oil and gas fields which are being exploited by BP and Centrica, among others.

Mr O’Reilly said yesterday that the Dalkey Island Prospect and Morecambe Bay area were once part of the same formation, but over time, movement in the earth’s crust split them apart. “This is Morecambe’s twin, and that area is very prolific,” he said.

Mr O’Reilly pledged yesterday that the company would move ahead with work on the Dalkey Island prospect. “We are very excited about it,” he said.
I wouldn't be so sure about that when I read articles like this one above from the Irish Times a couple of months back. I think this is a very important thread that people should start taking notice of before its too late!! :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:
 

termcg

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WOW never heard of that before now. I see your point but theres no mention of fracturing in anything I have read about them plus they are exploring for oil rather than gas.

Definitely something to keep an eye on but the credit crunch is mothballing most of projects like this as theres no demand or finance for them. Small projects like this were being driven by 2008 global demand, not 2010.
 

fiannafailure

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May 16, 2009
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2,069
Thanks for this information. Do you know if the Weald Basin in southern England is being worked, and if so how is the gas being extracted? I also read somewhere a mention of exploration in shale beds in the north of Ireland.
Unfortunately, I don't know much (yet) about the technology used, or its impacts - this is a whole new field to me.
Get studying and keep your nose to the grindstone, nobody has surveyed Ireland for shale gas prospects although we are possibly safe from this fate save around the Roscommon/ Leitrim area

junius

Re providence resources and Dalkey, it is unlikely this field is commercial until oil reaches €140 a barrel.

The announcement was intended to shore up their share price at this time.
 

fiannafailure

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Funny (not haha) - the guy at around 1.35 on youtube video asking "If you weren't able to do this hydraulic fracturing how much more would we be dependent on foreign oil...and terrorism?"
This was a reference to the real politic that Al Queda is in actual fact funded by a small percentage of the dollars that America sends to the Gulf states in return for their oil.

The relationship between the ruling Wahhabi sect in Saudi Arabia and America goes all the way back to a meeting between President Roosevelt and King Ibn Saud, aboard the USS Quincy, off the Suez coast.

President Roosevelt travelled to this meeting directly after the Yalta conference. He had two objectives in mind, the creation of Israel and agreement with Saudi Arabia on the American oil companies being heavily involved in developing the countries oil resources. King Saud refused to agree to creation of Israel but did agree to close cooperation in oil in return for a commitment that America would defend Saudi Arabian independence, called into play in Desert Storm I. This relationship was severely strained during the Yom Kippur war, which led to the 1973 oil crisis, but recovered and is now the cause of Osama Bin Ladens displeasure.


You can follow a clear trail from this meeting, through the decades and politics of oil directly to President Bush's decision to allow the Saudi royal family alone, to break the no flying rule in order to return to Saudi Arabia, in the days following 9/11.

There is by the way a strong political group in the US called the cheap hawks who argue that by America reducing its oil consumption the US will hurt Al Queda at much less cost than the War on Terror, watch that space carefully.

Sorry Pad, back to fracking
 

junius

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Where are the Lough Allen locals in this? Do they know the facts? Do they know that all these types of companies are born liars? If they havn't woken up, they'd better do so soon!

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2011/0221/1224290427180.html

Gas drilling permits for Lough Allen area given
By: Ronan McGreevy - Irish Times
TWO COMPANIES have been granted licences to explore an area in Lough Allen where it is thought there may be large reserves of natural gas.

The Lough Allen Natural Gas Company (Langco) and Australian-based Tamboran Resources have been given onshore petroleum licences to explore the area which takes in parts of Leitrim, Sligo, Roscommon, Cavan and Fermanagh.

The area is known to geologists as the northwest carboniferous basin.

The licence will allow the companies to undertake shallow drilling to a depth of 200m (650ft) and carry out technical studies to ascertain whether the gas is commercially viable.

If initial studies prove successful, the companies will have first option on a more expensive exploration licence which would be a step closer to extracting gas.

Langco believes there is 9.4 trillion cubic sq ft of gas or the energy equivalent of 1.5 billion barrels of oil in the area. This has a notional value of €94 billion at existing prices and could be considerably more by the time gas could be extracted from the ground.

The company’s managing director, Dr Martin Keeley, cautioned against premature expectations.

He said the only thing certain was that there was gas present as successive studies had shown. But they were a long way off from knowing whether it was worth extracting.

He distinguished between the resource number, which is the amount of gas in the ground, and the reserve number, the amount that is extractable.

The two are often widely different.

“Only a small percentage of it might ever be extracted. We are still at too early a stage to get overexcited,” he said.

“We will be taking a big risk trying to find out. But we know it’s there, which helps. Natural gas has already been found. The issue is one of economics and into that must be factored all necessary precautions to preserve and protect the environment and community,” he added.

Previous attempts were found to have been economically unviable, but the company believes that the rising price of gas and new technology could now make it a potentially viable proposition.

If the initial explorations are successful, the companies intend to return to the Petroleum Affairs Division of the Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources and seek an exploration licence.

However, this is a process that is at least 2½ years away.

Dr Keeley said there would be no question of deep drilling a beauty spot. “It would never be considered, nor would it be allowed to [and] rightly so.”

Last week the department also granted London-based oil exploration company Enegi Oil an onshore petroleum licensing option for the Clare Basin, an area which covers all of Clare and part of Kerry and Limerick.

The company believes there is shale gas similar to that found in Newfoundland, Canada. Both areas were joined together hundreds of millions of years ago.

Chief executive Alan Minty said they were investing up to €650,000 in the initial exploration of the area.

He said they would apply for exploration licences should the work programme identify prospective targets.
 
Last edited:

Falco

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The main problem with this form of extraction is the use of toxic lubricants that have already contaminated water supplies in states like Idaho and Pennsylvania. Indeed deaths of lifestock and human illness from such contaminated water sources have already been reported:(
 

junius

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EARLY HISTORY of Lough Allen Region

Are the people of Lough Allen asleep or something? Got this off a website


Lough Allen ........ is an award-winning adventure centre with a decidedly chilled atmosphere, which allows you the luxury of soaking up a relaxed “outback, outdoors” Leitrim experience. Enjoy the thrill of our amazing adventure program and reduce your carbon footprint, all at the same time.
As mentioned above, we do have an exciting adventure program with activities ranging from fun & adrenaline fuelled watersports such as windsurfing and kayaking to reaching the summits of North-West Ireland’s fabulous mountains. And lots in between.

We are an award-winning eco facility with outstanding commitment to protecting the environment. Why not make use of our solar-energy powered showering facilities - right after coming back from a windsurfing, session that you won't forget.
Think they need to wake up before it's too late! Many gas fracking videos on youtube. They don't make pleasant viewing.

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbIyR-hw7Eo"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbIyR-hw7Eo[/ame]

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUDLvg8YBR4&feature=related"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUDLvg8YBR4&feature=related[/ame]

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U01EK76Sy4A&feature=related"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U01EK76Sy4A&feature=related[/ame]
 
Last edited:

junius

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Lough Allen, County Leitrim & a gas fracking future?

Discussion of this at http://www.politics.ie/environment/135383-gasland-problems-gas-fracking.html

Do the people of Leitrim not care, not know or what? I think it's time they woke up and start asking questions before it's too late. The people in North Mayo have been up in arms for eleven years now because they didn't start asking the right questions in the mid-nineties at the first rumblings. Leitrim people need to get pro-active so they will be in the know! It may even be too late already!

Especially this bit
Dr Keeley said there would be no question of deep drilling a beauty spot. “It would never be considered, nor would it be allowed to [and] rightly so.”
hahahahahahahahahahaha!!


Gas drilling permits for Lough Allen area given - The Irish Times - Mon, Feb 21, 2011

Gas drilling permits for Lough Allen area given
By: Ronan McGreevy - Irish Times
TWO COMPANIES have been granted licences to explore an area in Lough Allen where it is thought there may be large reserves of natural gas.

The Lough Allen Natural Gas Company (Langco) and Australian-based Tamboran Resources have been given onshore petroleum licences to explore the area which takes in parts of Leitrim, Sligo, Roscommon, Cavan and Fermanagh.

The area is known to geologists as the northwest carboniferous basin.

The licence will allow the companies to undertake shallow drilling to a depth of 200m (650ft) and carry out technical studies to ascertain whether the gas is commercially viable.

If initial studies prove successful, the companies will have first option on a more expensive exploration licence which would be a step closer to extracting gas.

Langco believes there is 9.4 trillion cubic sq ft of gas or the energy equivalent of 1.5 billion barrels of oil in the area. This has a notional value of €94 billion at existing prices and could be considerably more by the time gas could be extracted from the ground.

The company’s managing director, Dr Martin Keeley, cautioned against premature expectations.

He said the only thing certain was that there was gas present as successive studies had shown. But they were a long way off from knowing whether it was worth extracting.

He distinguished between the resource number, which is the amount of gas in the ground, and the reserve number, the amount that is extractable.

The two are often widely different.

“Only a small percentage of it might ever be extracted. We are still at too early a stage to get overexcited,” he said.

“We will be taking a big risk trying to find out. But we know it’s there, which helps. Natural gas has already been found. The issue is one of economics and into that must be factored all necessary precautions to preserve and protect the environment and community,” he added.

Previous attempts were found to have been economically unviable, but the company believes that the rising price of gas and new technology could now make it a potentially viable proposition.

If the initial explorations are successful, the companies intend to return to the Petroleum Affairs Division of the Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources and seek an exploration licence.

However, this is a process that is at least 2½ years away.

Dr Keeley said there would be no question of deep drilling a beauty spot. “It would never be considered, nor would it be allowed to [and] rightly so.”

Last week the department also granted London-based oil exploration company Enegi Oil an onshore petroleum licensing option for the Clare Basin, an area which covers all of Clare and part of Kerry and Limerick.

The company believes there is shale gas similar to that found in Newfoundland, Canada. Both areas were joined together hundreds of millions of years ago.

Chief executive Alan Minty said they were investing up to €650,000 in the initial exploration of the area.

He said they would apply for exploration licences should the work programme identify prospective targets.
 

Agnotologist

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Jun 27, 2010
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Gas fracking has now been identified as the cause of earthquakes in Arizona. It has that potential in any unstable region, apparently. And radioactivity in Pittsburgh's water supply.
 

CiaranMacA

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May 31, 2011
Messages
3
Only just copping on now.

The people of Leitrim seem largely oblivious to this. Either the other cases were viewed as local issues and not relevant or we didn't hear about it or possibly didn't understand the possible consequenses. Aside from that very few people seem to have even heard the term 'fracking', me included, until recently.

Anyway, people are starting to look at it following a showing of Gaslands and there are people trying to get some kind of campaign going. One of the big worries is the type of campaign that'll start: Already some of the more hysterical protest-everything-you-hear-about heads are throwing about ideas like the govt. and big business wants to kill us all blah blah blah. It could turn into the Save Tara mess unless the actual locals (I'm a blow in, as were the majority at the screening) can be drawn into the campaign and some cooler heads take part.

First on our list is getting some real information:
What are the technologies, methods and chemicals they'll actually be using?
Has there been an environmental impact study?
Do the companies have a track record?
Are the licences new enough to take modern environmental science into account?
Can licences be challenged or has any consultation been done?

I literally only started on this right now so any information or direction would be more than welcome. For starters I want to find some one who dealt with this in North Mayo.
 

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