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Germany's Vice-Chancellor Says TTIP Trade Deal Is Dead



hurling_lad

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One of the few policy areas where Trump has gained traction among US voters is his opposition to trade deals. It's difficult to see TTIP succeed when political support is draining away from it.
 

blokesbloke

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Good.

Though being left out of TTIP was one of the "threats" used to persuade us to vote to remain in the EU.

Another fallacy.
 

constitutionus

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utter shill fest on the issue just finished on newstalk.

john somebody or other.

apparently they wanted to talk to ming but he was "unavailable" . took a few digs at brexiters too.

man the insiders are worried.

now going mad at us getting 19billion off apple.

:D

EDIT.

John fitzgerald was yer man. practially oozed insider.
 

jmcc

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Very good news indeed - I couldn't see any upside for Ireland or any sovereign jurisdiction and could never understand Enda Kenny's slavish acceptance of it for Ireland.
The f*cking thick little village idiot supports whatever his German masters tell him to support.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Is that the John Fitzgerald listed as a former ESRI economist? 'a member of the EU "Group for Economic Analysis" from 2002-2004 advising the President of the EU Commission on matters of Economic Policy.'

If it is the same chap then he has an interesting CV although like many an economist not exactly any kind of alchemic soothsayer. https://www.esri.ie/person/?userid=89

'began his career in the Irish Department of Finance in 1972 where he was the Department's macro-economic "fire brigade" - responsible for economic modelling and policy analysis, as well as applied economic research.'

'He is currently a member of the Commission of the Central Bank of Ireland and of the Independent Expert Panel established in 2014 by the Department of Communications Energy and Natural resources'.
 

danger here

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"The ball is rolling right now. The Commission is making steady progress," Commission spokesman Margaritis Schinas said when asked about comments by Gabriel's comments.

"Talks are now indeed entering a crucial stage but ... provided the conditions are right, the Commission stands ready to close this deal by the end of the year," Schinas told a regular press briefing.
 

Roberto Jordan

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Very good news indeed - I couldn't see any upside for Ireland or any sovereign jurisdiction and could never understand Enda Kenny's slavish acceptance of it for Ireland.
The thing for the past 6 months is practically every expert or neutral opinion or analytical piece on political opinion or globalization or just trade agreements has been urging caution and rethinking. Most have pointed out the limited gains in recent past from trade and the uncertainty regarding future such Marginal advantage.

This includes the FT , the NYT and the trade circulars

So if the public don't want it, if those who make their livelihood from commerce don't want it, if those who study economics don't want it....who does?

Seems a small group of politicians, internationalist diplomats and public servings as well as a small cohort of international finance. Nine of who mRepresent majoritary views In their respective group
 

Roberto Jordan

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Is that the John Fitzgerald listed as a former ESRI economist? 'a member of the EU "Group for Economic Analysis" from 2002-2004 advising the President of the EU Commission on matters of Economic Policy.'

If it is the same chap then he has an interesting CV although like many an economist not exactly any kind of alchemic soothsayer. https://www.esri.ie/person/?userid=89

'began his career in the Irish Department of Finance in 1972 where he was the Department's macro-economic "fire brigade" - responsible for economic modelling and policy analysis, as well as applied economic research.'

'He is currently a member of the Commission of the Central Bank of Ireland and of the Independent Expert Panel established in 2014 by the Department of Communications Energy and Natural resources'.
While the bold mr fitz is very much a middling fish in a tiny pond PLEASE tell me no one who posts on POLITICS.ie is unaware of John fitzs background, pedigree and career? Please.....
 

hurling_lad

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Good.

Though being left out of TTIP was one of the "threats" used to persuade us to vote to remain in the EU.

Another fallacy.
Yeah. I can't wait to see Liam Fox really stick it to the US multinationals when it comes to negotiating the post-Brexit trade deal.
 

Karloff

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Very good news indeed - I couldn't see any upside for Ireland or any sovereign jurisdiction and could never understand Enda Kenny's slavish acceptance of it for Ireland.
Neither Kenny nor FF understand the word NO as it pertains to the EU, they see themselves not as sovereign leaders but lesser administrators whose job it is to rubber stamp what Ger/Fra/Ita decide. You can count on them to oppose NOTHING that the EU decide.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
While the bold mr fitz is very much a middling fish in a tiny pond PLEASE tell me no one who posts on POLITICS.ie is unaware of John fitzs background, pedigree and career? Please.....
If it is the same fellow I am thinking of he was one of Ireland's most appointed in the quango-fest between 2000 and 2014.
 

Karloff

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Going into the Eurozone was a huge mistake. Supporting 'ever closer' disposal of national sovereignty was no 2, TTIP is the next huge mistake.

The US of Europe awaits a few more huge mistakes away. And no escape.

Manuel Barroso has just joined Goldman. Other Goldman employees enter the EU in top positions. That's who the EU is being run on behalf of and why we are where we are with treaties like TTIP being discussed.

Barroso is the guy who launched TTIP along with Obama.
 

Prof Honeydew

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Very good news indeed - I couldn't see any upside for Ireland or any sovereign jurisdiction and could never understand Enda Kenny's slavish acceptance of it for Ireland.
A trade agreement between the EU and the US would benefit Ireland more than most other EU member states because international trade is a far bigger component of Ireland's GDP than the EU average and because a greater percentage of Irish exports end up in the US than of any other EU member state.

There's no downside in opening up Ireland's manufacturing, energy, natural resources or services markets to American competition as any commercial operations that would have been vulnerable have already disappeared with the introduction of the EU Single Market. The one area of concern would be agriculture and food where differences in standards could expose the beef industry in particular to high-volume American producers. On the other hand, Irish dairy and specialty food producers could benefit from easier access to US markets.

TTIP may be hibernating at the moment but it isn't necessarily dead in the water. Trade negotiations are marathon events that can span several administrations in both parties. Sometimes they're left on hold until more favourable regimes and political climates allow them to resume.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
A trade agreement between the EU and the US would benefit Ireland more than most other EU member states because international trade is a far bigger component of Ireland's GDP than the EU average and because a greater percentage of Irish exports end up in the US than of any other EU member state.

There's no downside in opening up Ireland's manufacturing, energy, natural resources or services markets to American competition as any commercial operations that would have been vulnerable have already disappeared with the introduction of the EU Single Market. The one area of concern would be agriculture and food where differences in standards could expose the beef industry in particular to high-volume American producers. On the other hand, Irish dairy and specialty food producers could benefit from easier access to US markets.

TTIP may be hibernating at the moment but it isn't necessarily dead in the water. Trade negotiations are marathon events that can span several administrations in both parties. Sometimes they're left on hold until more favourable regimes and political climates allow them to resume.
There is only one slight problem with free trade deals negotiated with the US. They don't accept the free market unless it benefits their exporters.

They have no problem whatsoever stacking trade deals in their favour and when it comes to particular deals they will block access to foreign trade one way or another while insisting that trade partners adhere to the spirit and letter of agreements. They have more than enough facilitators within the Eurozone bureaucracy to enable them to do it as well.

I'd beware of any trade deal which has Goldman Sachs people on the American side and Goldman Sachs people on the European side in favour of said deal.
 

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