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Gerry Adams calls for border poll to be held north of the border


factual

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http://unitingireland.ie/?p=1402

http://leargas.blogspot.co.uk/

In an interesting blog post on his blog, leargas, Gerry Adams has praised unionists:

A little bit of history was made in the Seanad chamber in Leinster House last Friday. The inaugural meeting of the north south Inter-Parliamentary Association took place. Unionists and nationalists and republicans from all parts of this island rubbed shoulders and participated in the first meeting of a unique and innovative political institution that has its roots in the Good Friday Agreement.
Strand 2 of the Agreement allows for the ‘Assembly and the Oireachtas to consider developing a joint parliamentary forum, bringing together equal numbers from both institutions for discussions of matters of mutual interest and concern.’
Later in October 2006 agreement was reached at St. Andrew’s in Scotland which saw the re-establishment of the Executive and Assembly the following May. And once again it was agreed that a North-South parliamentary forum would be established.
George Mitchell memorably told me and Martin McGuinness, after the Good Friday Agreement was achieved and he was going home, ‘that’s the easy bit. Getting it implemented will be the hardest part.’ And he was right.
Unionism has sought to minimise and delay the full implementation of the Agreement ever since. There has been considerable progress but frequently the pace of change has been torturously slow and frustrating. And so it was with the north-south Inter-Parliamentary Association. It took 14 years to get to last Friday, but get there we did.
So, the Seanad chamber witnessed an equal number of MLAs from the Assembly and members from the Houses of the Oireachtas, under the Joint Chair of the Ceann Chomhairle Seán Barrett TD and the Speaker Willie Hay MLA, taking their seats as part of an arrangement that will see them meet twice a year to discuss issues of interest and concern including the economy, health, environment, energy and social issues.
This is a significant political development which should not be underestimated. It reflects the increasing acknowledgement that Ireland is too small for our people to live in isolation from each other and that working together is better for everyone.
He pointed out that a border poll is the next step:

The future of the Union is now a live debating issue and firmly on the political agenda.
In the Good Friday negotiations Sinn Féin secured the removal of the Government of Ireland Act under which the British government claimed sovereignty over the north of Ireland. There is now only a qualified, conditional claim that will change when a majority of citizens in the north vote for an end to the union.
In the Constitutional Issues section of the Good Friday (or Belfast) Agreement (1.iv) the British and Irish governments:
“affirm that, if, in future, the people of the island of Ireland exercise their right of self-determination on the basis set out in sections (i) and (ii) above to bring about a united Ireland, it will be a binding obligation on both governments to introduce and support in their respective Parliaments legislation to give effect to that wish”
Sections (i) and (ii) referred to are the requirement for the consent of a majority within the North and the provision for concurrent referenda North and South.
The Good Friday Agreement therefore provides for a border poll on Irish unity. This commitment was incorporated in the British Northern Ireland Act 1998 (Schedule 1) which states that: “The Secretary of State may by order direct the holding of a poll for the purposes of section 1 [of the Act re. Irish unity] on a date specified in the order.”
I raised this issue with the Taoiseach during Leaders Questions in the Dáil on Tuesday. I welcomed his comment last week in Cleveland in the USA where he had expressed the opinion that a united Ireland will happen ‘one day.’
Predictably, Gregory Campbell rushed to condemn Kenny. But his position was not shared by an online poll in the Belfast Telegraph which produced 46% supporting the Taoiseach’s view that a united Ireland will happen.
However, I put it to the Taoiseach that there is a need to go beyond the rhetoric. Uniting Ireland is one of the great historic challenges facing the Irish people at the start of the 21st century.
The people of this island have the right to independence and self-determination. Partition is unjust, uneconomic and inefficient.
But a united Ireland will only happen when those of those who want it persuade those who don’t that it will be better for them and for their children. It needs a plan, a strategy. We have to demonstrate in practical ways why working as partners and living together as equals on this island is better.
So I called on the Taoiseach to come back to the Dáil in the next short while with an outline of how he envisages securing the full implementation of the Good Friday Agreement and a border poll.
Not surprisingly the Fine Gael leader looked for excuses to do nothing at this time. He argued that it isn’t the right time for this debate and that the Irish government has to sort out the economy first.
This is entirely the wrong approach. Now is exactly the right time for a debate on this issue in the context of rebuilding the economies on this island and beginning a process of dialogue and reconciliation around Irish unity.
The Good Friday Agreement allows for a border poll. It must be the next step.
Comment: interesting to see Gerry Adams calling for this. Assuming that Enda Kenny gets David Cameron to agree, it will be an interesting campaign. A challenge, because at present there is a lot of hostility to a UI among unionists. But even today, on the NI forum, a protesetant has started a thread explaining why he is seeing the benefits of a UI. So this is all to play for. On the one hand, calling for a poll is a risk, because it will not be easy to win. On the other hand, this is what politics is all about - campaigning.
 

Con Gallagher

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We would need more details...
- will Westminster simply be replaced by Dublin?
- what happens the NHS?
- what happens the public sector workers in the north?
- how much will tax rise on both sides of the border?
- what services will be cut?
- what is the position of the EU?
- why would anyone in the north vote to take on privatized banking debt?
- how would accountability improve?
- is there a new draft for the Constitution?

The reason why divorce passed ten years after it was defeated, is because all the groundwork was done in advance. Is see no sign they anyone is serious about reunification.
 

Truth.ie

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Yes, lets have a poll within a artificially created, gerrymandered State.
Partition affects both sides of the border, thus it should be an All Island vote on partition.
Can't believe SF have adopted the British position on this.
 

Sister Mercedes

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Does Gerry Adams think that a Border Poll is the most compelling issue today on the minds of voters in the Irish Republic, in whose parliament he now sits?

Or would they view this as further evidence that Mr Adams hasn't a clue what to say on the economic crisis, so he is falling back on more familiar, distracting issues?
 

factual

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Yes, lets have a poll within a artificially created, gerrymandered State.
Partition affects both sides of the border, thus it should be an All Island vote on partition.
Can't believe SF have adopted the British position on this.
This is as in the GFA as agreed in all party talks.
 

Ulster-Lad

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Yes, lets have a poll within a artificially created, gerrymandered State.
Partition affects both sides of the border, thus it should be an All Island vote on partition.
Can't believe SF have adopted the British position on this.
Or just the counties of Ulster, all 9 of them (and Louth)
 

death or glory

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Bring on the border poll, we are not afraid.
There is no genuine interest in an united ireland within Northern Ireland apart from within hardline republicans
 

factual

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Bring on the border poll, we are not afraid.
There is no genuine interest in an united ireland within Northern Ireland apart from within hardline republicans
That is what they said about Scots independence but a poll is being held there.
 

Con Gallagher

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Yes, lets have a poll within a artificially created, gerrymandered State.
Partition affects both sides of the border, thus it should be an All Island vote on partition.
Can't believe SF have adopted the British position on this.
It is the position of the Irish people as expressed in two referenda in 1998. A majority of the Irish people voted for the Good Friday Agreement. You may disagree with them, but tough. Partition will end with two separate polls in the 26 and 6 counties. Both must pass. Therefore a border poll confined to the north is an admission of defeat in advance by Adams. There needs to be a lot more work done before there is a point in holding these polls.
 

ruserious

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If Gerry gets one in 2014 as he wants, the next one can't be held till at least 2021, the centenary of independence. Smart fish.
 

Protestant/Catholic=Irish

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Does Gerry Adams think that a Border Poll is the most compelling issue today on the minds of voters in the Irish Republic, in whose parliament he now sits?

Or would they view this as further evidence that Mr Adams hasn't a clue what to say on the economic crisis, so he is falling back on more familiar, distracting issues?
Are TDs not allowed to deal with more than one issue at a time?
 

Boy M5

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Does Gerry Adams think that a Border Poll is the most compelling issue today on the minds of voters in the Irish Republic, in whose parliament he now sits?

Or would they view this as further evidence that Mr Adams hasn't a clue what to say on the economic crisis, so he is falling back on more familiar, distracting issues?
If SF is serious about winning power at ballot box and reunifying Ireland surely they should be filling the leadership vacuum in our country as regards the bail out of the € by the Irish tax payers' bail out of the bank bond holders. Providing the vision and leadership that is missing in Govt Buildings, Iveagh Ho, Merrion St.....
 

Seanie Lemass

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Factual, I think you showed your hand by posting that story about Jimmy Savile and the IRA.


I shall say no more.


As for poll, the last time there was an All Ireland election in 1918, the majority elected people in favour of secession from the Empire and a Republic. That election has never been overturned despite the Tans.
 

Truth.ie

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I remember Mrs Thatcher on T.V saying this around the mid 80's.
That a United Ireland can only come about when the "majority of people in Northern Ireland give their consent."
Adams hit back the nexy day, saying this was a Unionist veto, partitionist, and that the minority on the island were given the power to block any future decisions by the majority on the Island.
20 years later and maybe 2000 deaths after, Gerry Adams comes around to the Thatcher principle and his supporters call it a victory.
 

factual

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I remember Mrs Thatcher on T.V saying this around the mid 80's.
That a United Ireland can only come about when the "majority of people in Northern Ireland give their consent."
Adams hit back the nexy day, saying this was a Unionist veto, partitionist, and that the minority on the island were given the power to block any future decisions by the majority on the Island.
20 years later and maybe 2000 deaths after, Gerry Adams comes around to the Thatcher principle and his supporters call it a victory.
This was part of a package of measures agreed in all party talks , that led to the GFA.
 

Ex celt

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Factual, I think you showed your hand by posting that story about Jimmy Savile and the IRA.


I shall say no more.


As for poll, the last time there was an All Ireland election in 1918, the majority elected people in favour of secession from the Empire and a Republic. That election has never been overturned despite the Tans.
Less than 50% voted for SF in 1918.
Btw you havent named your family's murder victims.
 
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