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getting a passport in irish

fearanphoist

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Jan 27, 2007
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does anybody know why the passport office wont give out an irish passport as gaeilge anymore ?
 


padraig

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fearanphoist said:
does anybody know why the passport office wont give out an irish passport as gaeilge anymore ?
I think your wrong in that I renewed my passport in the past six months and it is in gaeilge.
 

fearanphoist

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i haven't used my irish name on any formal documentation so they say i have to be using it for 2 years before they will issue it. its a joke i have to wait that long.

you probably had it in irish already!
 

padraig

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fearanphoist said:
i haven't used my irish name on any formal documentation so they say i have to be using it for 2 years before they will issue it. its a joke i have to wait that long.

you probably had it in irish already!
True I did, but when I first did get it they only ask how long I had used the gaeilge form of my name, I didn't have to show any formal documentation to prove that.
 

fearanphoist

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yeah they changed it now . i am tackling them though not letting them get away with that.

with the official language act 2003 and the announcement before christmas about the irish language , the department of foreign of affairs is in a league of there own .
 

DJP

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Most people know me by my English name, although over the last couple of years I use my Irish name a lot.

I heard that it is an awful hassel booking plane tickets if you have a fada in your name. What if you name is Seán, for example, on your birth cert- do you always have to book tickets by spelling your name with the fada?
 

Wednesday

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Darren Mac an Phríora said:
I heard that it is an awful hassel booking plane tickets if you have a fada in your name. What if you name is Seán, for example, on your birth cert- do you always have to book tickets by spelling your name with the fada?
Actually, the hassle is that online booking systems often can't read the fadas. I was booking tickets awhile ago for a computer-illiterate in the office and without even thinking about it I put in the fadas in his name. When he turned up at the airport there was a big rigamarole because the letters with fadas had registered on their system as things like Ǽ, Σ etc.
 
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Sorry, this is slighty off topic but still on citizenship.

I've read citizenship act and it says that anyone born on the island of Ireland is an Irish citizen.

So ...... Why did i think that anyone born in Northern Ireland, who didn't have an Irish passport and whose grandparents were born after 1922 couldn't get one?

Have I just mixed myself up? Has the citizenship act been updated / changed from the version I read?
 

padraig

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Darren Mac an Phríora said:
Most people know me by my English name, although over the last couple of years I use my Irish name a lot.

I heard that it is an awful hassel booking plane tickets if you have a fada in your name. What if you name is Seán, for example, on your birth cert- do you always have to book tickets by spelling your name with the fada?
Just drop the fada when booking tickets, it dosen't cause any problem.
 

padraig

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Shankill Browser said:
Sorry, this is slighty off topic but still on citizenship.

I've read citizenship act and it says that anyone born on the island of Ireland is an Irish citizen.

So ...... Why did i think that anyone born in Northern Ireland, who didn't have an Irish passport and whose grandparents were born after 1922 couldn't get one?

Have I just mixed myself up? Has the citizenship act been updated / changed from the version I read?
I was born in the north and had no problem getting a Irish passport.
 

fearanphoist

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hi darren its karl ,

hows things , thats a valid point but still getting a passport should be easy , not all the hassle i have gone through so far.
 

Sidewinder

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fearanphoist said:
but still getting a passport should be easy , not all the hassle i have gone through so far.
Not really. The passport is the premier global ID. It identifies you as a citizen of this State and has legal implications should you get up to anything while abroad. They should be slightly awkward to get - and especially if the name you want on it is different from the name on yer birth cert!

Seems perfectly reasonable to me that they should ask for evidence that you are actually known by the new name and that it is an established identity, not just some silly whim you'll be moaning about in 6 months time.
 

White Horse

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You think Gaelic is bad. I have a friend in Clontibret who has been trying for 5 years to get an Irish passport in Ulster-Scots!

Some parity of esteem.
 

DJP

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Its called Irish. I agree that anyone- particularly when we have a cross-border Ulster-Scots agency- should be able to get a passport in Ulster-Scots.

Then again, you are such a s*it head, that I doubt you have any friends, mon frere.
 

Jim236

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White Horse said:
You think Gaelic is bad. I have a friend in Clontibret who has been trying for 5 years to get an Irish passport in Ulster-Scots!

Some parity of esteem.
Well it makes sense for a passport not to be available in Ulster Scots as it's not an official language, or even spoken by many people in Ireland, but there shouldn't be a problem getting it done as Gaeilge, as it's the first official language of the country, and the government is obliged to offer the service as Gaeilge under the Language Act 2003.
I'll find out soon enough anyway how easy it is when I apply for a new passport later this week as Gaeilge.
 

Sidewinder

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Jim236 said:
Well it makes sense for a passport not to be available in Ulster Scots as it's not an official language, or even spoken by many people in Ireland
In fact the EU concluded that Ulster-Scots is spoken by precisely no-one. They couldn't find one single native speaker.

You shouldn't have a problem getting a passport in the Irish form of your name, provided you can demonstrate that you actually use the Irish form of your name and that somebody, somewhere, actually knows you by your name in Irish. If your birth cert and all your various documents, utility bills, driving licence, Xtravision card, etc. etc. are all in the English form they'll tell you to go away, and rightly so as that sort of thing would cause massive confusion if you were ever arrested abroad.

Lastly, on the point about airline booking systems not taking fadas - neither does Eircom's billing system. Eircom. Sheesh. Lufthansa I can understand, but the ex-public monopoly of Ireland not being able to handle names with a fada? :roll:
 

White Horse

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Jim236 said:
White Horse said:
You think Gaelic is bad. I have a friend in Clontibret who has been trying for 5 years to get an Irish passport in Ulster-Scots!

Some parity of esteem.
Well it makes sense for a passport not to be available in Ulster Scots as it's not an official language, or even spoken by many people in Ireland, but there shouldn't be a problem getting it done as Gaeilge, as it's the first official language of the country, and the government is obliged to offer the service as Gaeilge under the Language Act 2003.
Actually, I agree that passports should be readily available in Gaelic due to it's eleveated legal status.

The issue of whether we are a generous enough society to accomodate those very few individuals who speak Ulster-Scots is a different issue.

My friend would point out our obligations under the GFA.
 

Wednesday

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Sidewinder said:
Lastly, on the point about airline booking systems not taking fadas - neither does Eircom's billing system. Eircom. Sheesh. Lufthansa I can understand, but the ex-public monopoly of Ireland not being able to handle names with a fada? :roll:
The airline I was referring to was Aer Arann :oops:
 


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