Ghost Town - 2nd city main street daily closure - 40% decline in footfall and a 60% slump in turnover

Watcher2

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Fvcking council staff ignoramuses over-layed with Green Party bolloxology. They wont rest until they have every city fvcked.
 


brughahaha

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Fvcking council staff ignoramuses over-layed with Green Party bolloxology. They wont rest until they have every city fvcked.
They have Dublin half way there already
 

cricket

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I'm totally confused by this. Patrick street is awfully quiet after 3pm each day. But, just about nobody has ever parked there to shop in that or other streets for a generation. I think there's a bit of a herd mentality at work. Put the word out that the city is choked in other streets and people stay away. But, that's not the case, certainly after the first week of the experiment. Bus Eireann did away with the stop on Lavitt's Quay outside Larry Tompkins pub and the traffic on that quay moves fine after that.
The buses are now on time almost 100% each day.
 

tigerben

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I rarely go into the city , if I do it’s cheaper to pay the parking than get the bus or the train from Midleton. Was there two weeks back on a Sunday and it was very quiet . The Main Street of Midleton is busier. Anyone from that area heads to Wilton then goes into Mahon point . It’s easier , free parking and with teenagers Penney’s and berska are the two main shops . Online shopping is also hitting the city . Without the cars and traffic the city does look empty. Cork isn’t a big city , it’s a big town really and what works in a big big city might not work in a small city . The only bit of a buzz is around Paul street shopping centre where there are people coming and going .
 

robut

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robut

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https://www.facebook.com/minihanscork/posts/2030750266937292



Morrisons Island Project

I am a City center trader and owner of Minihan's Chemistin Oliver Plunkett Street; an independent family owned business employing seven people, which has served the people of Cork for the past 63 years. We have survived many changes to our city center; I supported the pedestrianization of Winthrop Street back in the mid-seventies followed by the pedestrianization of Oliver Plunkett Street etc., the main drainage scheme etc, all in what I believed and hoped would be for the benefit of our City.

As a former elected member of Cork City Council and member of Seanad Eireann, I have a certain appreciation of the role of the Council and Management in setting out policies to promote our City and incentivise a certain regeneration programme. I pay my corporation and income taxes, my rates, my water charges my PRSI contributions, my prescription levies and I feel I am entitled to have my voice heard. I appreciate our democratic process but equally feel the views of our City center traders are not taken seriously by Council, we are purely seen as a revenue stream available to balance the budget with commercial rate increases whenever the need arises. I understand the policy to improve the pedestrianization of the city center between the two rivers known as the island. As a sitting Councillor I supported many such initiatives and worked constructively with management on many issues. I was never one to oppose for the sake of opposition.

Regrettably as a Councillor I supported the sale of the lands in Mahon to both Owen O'Callaghan and McCarthy Developments. I did so because of the promises made by council for reinvestment in the city, promises that were never fully fulfilled. No park and ride from the western suburb, no rejuvenation for the city center and no incentives on parking. We need easy access to and from our City Center, be it with a properly functioning public transport scheme or incentivised parking. Clear and direct investment has to be made in this area and it should not be introduced merely as a revenue stream. I have no doubt a clear plan is in place to compensate the council for loss of revenue for the 115 places, I presume you will reduce the two hourly zones and extend the pay for parking zones. These measures mitigate the council but there is nothing to mitigate the City trader. The heart and soul of our City is in the City centre, the uniqueness of Oliver Plunkett Street North Main Street etc is made possible by the many and varied independent small traders with their uniqueness and character. The City center and its people define the Economic, Social and Cultural heart of our City. This will never be replaced by the shopping centers of Mahon, Wilton, Douglas or Blackpool with their hundreds of free parking places on their door step.

I operate a Pharmacy and deal not only with passing trade but also with regular customers, some of whom have shopped in Minihan's for years, like their parents and Grandparents before them. We are an integral part of their lives, like many pharmacies we provide social support and medical advice. Due to the limited parking now available in the City many of our elderly customers after years of patronage can no longer avail of our service. We have introduced home deliveries, technically in breach of pharmacy regulation, we often walk to the South Mall to deliver to someone parked outside the Imperial, a usual pick up point. Our elderly customers are simply finding more and more difficult to do business with us and are now forced to change pharmacy at the most vulnerable time in their lives. The removal of a further 115 parking places in the Morrison's Island area will directly impact on the customers I have left. Parking places on the Mall have already been reduced to facilitate bicycles and now we have this further reduction.

This move is short sighted and further undermines our ability to trade. A fully pedestrianized city center has to be able to be serviced, the three key ingredients to successful retail are STOCK, STAFF and CUSTOMERS. Staff are finding it harder to get to and from work, stock can't be delivered and customers can't access our Pharmacy. Why is our ability to trade being continuously and arbitrarily undermined?

I would add the nature of Pharmacy business and deliveries are unique. Our main medical delivery takes place three times a day; this caters for certain prescription medication and high-tech medicines, which has a short shelf life and can't be held in stock. When Oliver Plunkett Street was pedestrianized we had to renegotiate deliveries, introduce and early morning and have our lunchtime and evening delivery made in Patrick Street. However the latest short-sighted closing of Patrick Street to traffic between 3.30 and 6.30 means my supplier has cancelled my evening delivery, which directly impacts on my business and my ability to provide medication to my customers on the same day of receiving a prescription. I fail to understand this move, and if pedestrianization is the objective, why leave Patrick Street open to Buses and Taxis?

My business that has traded for sixty-three years is slowly but surely being pulled under not by recession not by competition but by the anti-trader policies being adopted by Cork City Council. As I said earlier, the Economic Social and Cultural heart of our city is in the City center and the policies being promoted by City Council are simply eroding the very ethos of our City.

If we want to have a pedestrianized city center we need an orbital / circular access South Mall, Merchants quay Patricks Street Grand parade allowing movement between the main pedestrian areas of Paul Street, North Main Street and Oliver Plunkett Street. We need to relocate the bus station to Horgan's quay in conjunction with the railway station; in my time on the City Council I tabled a number of motions to this effect. The Bus station and bus access to and from it, is a constant hindrance to the free flowing of City traffic.

If you discard the views of retailers and implement policy from desktop analysis supported by elected members who have consistently failed to represent the interest of the City Center (no votes in the City Center) your policy is doomed for failure.

John Minihan
 

GDPR

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When Oxford and Regent Streets in London are closed to all motorised traffic there is a massive increase in shoppers. Happens a couple of weekends a year.

Maybe Cork can just get used to it and no whining?

Pedestrianisation sounds like a good idea to me, then again I've only been to Cork once.
 

Northsideman

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The main street in Cork City - Patrick St - is closed each day from 3pm to 6.30pm. Except for buses, taxi's, bikes.


Apparently at about 2pm on, people are in a mad rush to get out of dodge before the 3pm "curfew" .. as some see it. What it really shows up is if we cant drive to & park the car .. literally ... at the doorway of where we are going then forget it

Ghost town: Cork traders threaten rates revolt over city centre car ban





I added this here in economy section instead of Cork section because I think, economically it is something of general interest for everyone to discuss. I wonder might this be the thinking in other towns and cities across the country?

It brings up the debate about public transport, lack of & inefficiencies. Park and ride facilities. City and town centre parking. And how people shop and where.

Apparently there is a recent report that showed something like 65% of traffic flowing through Patrick Street never stops, its being used to cross the city.

What i found amazing about this is the minute this regime came into place 2 weeks ago Foot Fall, Turnover in city centre businesses dropped through the floor. That sudden.

Being discussed on local radio, utterances come out that a number of businesses will either be closed or curtail there opening hours within next 3 months if this carries on. Does this show us that many businesses are just hanging in there? Whats up?

Are there other issues in retail in general and this is just the last straw thats pushing them over the edge?
Only the Second City is Belfast.
 

gerhard dengler

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Only the Second City is Belfast.
Belfast is a good example actually. Unlike cities in this jurisdiction, Belfast doesn't appear to be encircled by retail outlets throughout it's surburbs ie. outside of it's city centre.
Belfast city centre is packed because places like Victoria Square were developed right in the middle of it's city centre.
 

Northsideman

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Belfast is a good example actually. Unlike cities in this jurisdiction, Belfast doesn't appear to be encircled by retail outlets throughout it's surburbs ie. outside of it's city centre.
Belfast city centre is packed because places like Victoria Square were developed right in the middle of it's city centre.
There are quite a few large retail parks, outside the city of Belfast but yes the City centre is buzzing, Cork centre is a kip.
 

owedtojoy

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The main street in Cork City - Patrick St - is closed each day from 3pm to 6.30pm. Except for buses, taxi's, bikes.


Apparently at about 2pm on, people are in a mad rush to get out of dodge before the 3pm "curfew" .. as some see it. What it really shows up is if we cant drive to & park the car .. literally ... at the doorway of where we are going then forget it

Ghost town: Cork traders threaten rates revolt over city centre car ban





I added this here in economy section instead of Cork section because I think, economically it is something of general interest for everyone to discuss. I wonder might this be the thinking in other towns and cities across the country?

It brings up the debate about public transport, lack of & inefficiencies. Park and ride facilities. City and town centre parking. And how people shop and where.

Apparently there is a recent report that showed something like 65% of traffic flowing through Patrick Street never stops, its being used to cross the city.

What i found amazing about this is the minute this regime came into place 2 weeks ago Foot Fall, Turnover in city centre businesses dropped through the floor. That sudden.

Being discussed on local radio, utterances come out that a number of businesses will either be closed or curtail there opening hours within next 3 months if this carries on. Does this show us that many businesses are just hanging in there? Whats up?

Are there other issues in retail in general and this is just the last straw thats pushing them over the edge?
Shop Street in Galway has been closed to cars for ages, and it is pretty much a hive of pedestrian shopping activity.

Cork seems to be exceptional.
 

gerhard dengler

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Dublin city centre is quiet relative to the footfall in places like Liffey Valley and Dundrum SC
 

Northsideman

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Dublin city centre is quiet relative to the footfall in places like Liffey Valley and Dundrum SC
The City Council seem determined to kill trade and make it a cultural quarter full of junkies and scumbags, great plan.
 

SEAMAI

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Shop Street in Galway has been closed to cars for ages, and it is pretty much a hive of pedestrian shopping activity.

Cork seems to be exceptional.
75% of the streets on either side of Patrick Street are pedestrianised, some have been for 40 years, Oliver Plunkett Street is traffic free from 10.00 'til 17.00 every day and works very well, however restricting vehicles on Patrick Street means there is s large chunk of the city centre on an island which now needs to be avoided if driving causing more congestion, so people will start to avoid the centre.
 
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Clanrickard

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The main street in Cork City - Patrick St - is closed each day from 3pm to 6.30pm. Except for buses, taxi's, bikes.


Apparently at about 2pm on, people are in a mad rush to get out of dodge before the 3pm "curfew" .. as some see it. What it really shows up is if we cant drive to & park the car .. literally ... at the doorway of where we are going then forget it

Ghost town: Cork traders threaten rates revolt over city centre car ban





I added this here in economy section instead of Cork section because I think, economically it is something of general interest for everyone to discuss. I wonder might this be the thinking in other towns and cities across the country?

It brings up the debate about public transport, lack of & inefficiencies. Park and ride facilities. City and town centre parking. And how people shop and where.

Apparently there is a recent report that showed something like 65% of traffic flowing through Patrick Street never stops, its being used to cross the city.

What i found amazing about this is the minute this regime came into place 2 weeks ago Foot Fall, Turnover in city centre businesses dropped through the floor. That sudden.

Being discussed on local radio, utterances come out that a number of businesses will either be closed or curtail there opening hours within next 3 months if this carries on. Does this show us that many businesses are just hanging in there? Whats up?

Are there other issues in retail in general and this is just the last straw thats pushing them over the edge?
It shows the shocking laziness of Irish people and shows how car dependent we are. Further taxes are needed to dissuade excessive car use.
 

SEAMAI

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It shows the shocking laziness of Irish people and shows how car dependent we are. Further taxes are needed to dissuade excessive car use.
I agree completely with you but this is not the crux of the issue here. Patrick St. happens to be one of the main routes through the city centre, when you block a main route, traffic has to go somewhere else, options are limited, you end up with gridlock. Just another reason to avoid the city centre and head for the suburbs instead. This was an I'll conceived plan on the part of CCC. I pass through the street most mornings and trucks off loading deliveries at 8.30 add to rush hour problems. Why is this not being addressed? This needs to be out of the way before 7.30 but of course the business owners don't want to be in early to oversee this.

Parents driving their little darlings to school seems to be one of the biggest contributors to chaotic traffic in the mornings. The Easter school break was heaven for commuting but that all changed again last Monday morning once the schools reopened.
 
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dizillusioned

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Simple answer... Retail Parks... free parking, all shops in one location and you can use the car.

Dublin City Center is dying. The INternet shopping experience, high cost of parking, trouble getting in and around the city and the hassle of parking all means it will be nothing in a few years. The only thing you have to do is look at the US every city center is dead.
 


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