Girl wins legal case to be cryogenically frozen

O

Oscurito

An extraordinary story is emerging from the UK this morning. Reporting of it was under injunction until midnight last night, to the extent that the paper review program on Sky News had to blank out coverage of it when it was displaying previews of several nation dailies.

It relates to a terminally-ill British teenager who wanted her body to be cryogenically frozen in the hope that she could be brought back to life at some point in the future, even if it took centuries. Last month, before her death, she won a historic legal case to have her request granted.

Her divorced parents had become embroiled in a dispute with the father initially opposing her right to be cryogenically preserved. Her mother had supported her wish.

The 14-year-old girl who had a rare form of cancer passed away on October 17th. Her body will be frozen at a specialist facility in the USA.

The Guardian: 14-year-old girl who died of cancer wins right to be cryogenically frozen

The Daily Telegraph gives a fuller and somewhat more critical review of the case:
Girl, 14, who died of cancer cryogenically frozen after telling judge she wanted to be brought back to life "in hundreds of years"
 
Last edited:


silverharp

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 21, 2015
Messages
16,392
who is paying for it?
 

Cellachán Chaisil

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 3, 2009
Messages
9,841
O

Oscurito

who is paying for it?
According to the Torygraph, the grandparents raised the money.

[Her] parents could not afford to pay for the cryonic process, which costs from £37,000, but her maternal grandparents raised the money needed for her body to be frozen and taken to a storage facility in America - one of only two countries, along with Russia, that has facilities for storing frozen bodies.
Girl, 14, who died of cancer cryogenically frozen after telling judge she wanted to be brought back to life 'in hundreds of years'
 

wombat

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 16, 2007
Messages
33,096
A sad story, more exploitation of the desperate.
 
O

Oscurito

fairplay if that is her wish.
The whole principle of cryogenics is - scientifically - very dubious and utterly unproven.

But, it's her body and her mother and grandparents supported her.

Her father withdrew his opposition in the end.
 

ruserious

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
29,090
I think my girlfriend may have had this done. I've been getting the cold shoulder a lot lately. :p
 

Bubbleheaded

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 20, 2016
Messages
551
Poor girl. Cryogenics is charlatan science. The process almost certainly destroys every organ including the brain. Even if (and it's a big if) future technology existed (such as advanced medical nanotechnology) to repair the organ damage (and if the body didn't turn to mush when thawed, and if it could be brought back to life, and if a cure was available for whatever killed the patient in the first place), the likelihood is that the brain could never be repaired. Even if it was, how much of the persons memories and experiences would be lost? This is all without getting into the question of the intense psychological stress the person would feel when they realised that everyone they loved was long dead, and the world was unrecognisable to them. Pure science fiction.
 

nicenin

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 14, 2007
Messages
1,462
There's a rumour going around media circles (not joking) that Bowie, Rickman and Wogan have all availed of this service.

Hence no public funerals but much balderdash and piffle in circulation in the press about their send-offs.

The company offering the service is in the US, called Alcor Life Extension.
 

Polly Ticks

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 6, 2016
Messages
3,268
Assuming it works... can you imagine what it would be like for her to awake in the year 2150 or 2300 or whatever? Mind-boggling.

Also if this process of freezing and reviving is proven to work, but we don't have tech to prevent ageing at the same time.. what's to stop people having themselves frozen at say 30 years old (rather than 80) so that they can be in good health when they are revived 200 years down the line?!
 

Roll_On

Well-known member
Joined
May 27, 2010
Messages
17,544
The whole principle of cryogenics is - scientifically - very dubious and utterly unproven.

But, it's her body and her mother and grandparents supported her.

Her father withdrew his opposition in the end.
Maybe but if there's a chance it works, it's a perfectly rational choice, it makes more sense than wanting to be left in a box in the ground.
 

nicenin

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 14, 2007
Messages
1,462
Poor girl. Cryogenics is charlatan science. The process almost certainly destroys every organ including the brain. Even if (and it's a big if) future technology existed (such as advanced medical nanotechnology) to repair the organ damage (and if the body didn't turn to mush when thawed, and if it could be brought back to life, and if a cure was available for whatever killed the patient in the first place), the likelihood is that the brain could never be repaired. Even if it was, how much of the persons memories and experiences would be lost? This is all without getting into the question of the intense psychological stress the person would feel when they realised that everyone they loved was long dead, and the world was unrecognisable to them. Pure science fiction.
Good movie from 2001 about the psychological impact of cryonics, "Vanilla Sky" with Tom Cruise.

Assuming it works... can you imagine what it would be like for her to awake in the year 2150 or 2300 or whatever? Mind-boggling.

Also if this process of freezing and reviving is proven to work, but we don't have tech to prevent ageing at the same time.. what's to stop people having themselves frozen at say 30 years old (rather than 80) so that they can be in good health when they are revived 200 years down the line?!
See Woody Allen's "Sleeper" from 1973.
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 17, 2011
Messages
49,743
Is it not the case that the mother won the right to decide what happened to her daughter's body, rather than the daughter winning the right to be frozen? The father objected to her dying wish (due to costs, I believe). The judge seems to have decided that as the father had not seen the daughter for 8 years, the mother should get to decide.

So, it seems that the story actually is, "Mother wins right to decide on daughter's dying wish, as father had not seen daughter for more than half of her life".

Not really about cryonics at all, I'd suggest.
 

Roll_On

Well-known member
Joined
May 27, 2010
Messages
17,544
Assuming it works... can you imagine what it would be like for her to awake in the year 2150 or 2300 or whatever? Mind-boggling.

Also if this process of freezing and reviving is proven to work, but we don't have tech to prevent ageing at the same time.. what's to stop people having themselves frozen at say 30 years old (rather than 80) so that they can be in good health when they are revived 200 years down the line?!
If/when such advancements are made, 80 will be a young age, several other ground breaking advancements will have to be made before animal cells can be reanimated from a frozen state.
 
O

Oscurito

Maybe but if there's a chance it works, it's a perfectly rational choice, it makes more sense than wanting to be left in a box in the ground.
The father did make some important arguments.

The alternative, however, was potentially worse, as he set out in a statement to a judge who was to decide his daughter’s posthumous fate.

“Even if the treatment is successful and she is brought back to life in, let's say, 200 years,” he said, “she may not find any relative and she might not remember things.

"She may be left in a desperate situation - given that she is still only 14 years old - and will be in the United States of America [where her body was to be stored]."
Girl, 14, who died of cancer cryogenically frozen after telling judge she wanted to be brought back to life "in hundreds of years"

The cryogenicist company has its money now. What incentive is there for them to conduct further research to see how frozen bodies can be brought back to life?
 

Roll_On

Well-known member
Joined
May 27, 2010
Messages
17,544
Is it not the case that the mother won the right to decide what happened to her daughter's body, rather than the daughter winning the right to be frozen? The father objected to her dying wish (due to costs, I believe). The judge seems to have decided that as the father had not seen the daughter for 8 years, the mother should get to decide.

So, it seems that the story actually is, "Mother wins right to decide on daughter's dying wish, as father had not seen daughter for more than half of her life".

Not really about cryonics at all, I'd suggest.
Indeed the ruling wasn't about cryonics. One would have to question why the father would go through such great lengths to stop her fulfilling her dying wish and indeed why he would want to not see his daughter for so long.
 

Bubbleheaded

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 20, 2016
Messages
551
Good movie from 2001 about the psychological impact of cryonics, "Vanilla Sky" with Tom Cruise.
Pretty sure I have that DVD stashed away somewhere (sorry Xtravision). Good movie alright.
 

nicenin

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 14, 2007
Messages
1,462
Assuming it works... can you imagine what it would be like for her to awake in the year 2150 or 2300 or whatever? Mind-boggling.

Also if this process of freezing and reviving is proven to work, but we don't have tech to prevent ageing at the same time.. what's to stop people having themselves frozen at say 30 years old (rather than 80) so that they can be in good health when they are revived 200 years down the line?!
If/when such advancements are made, 80 will be a young age, several other ground breaking advancements will have to be made before animal cells can be reanimated from a frozen state.
There's an experiment underway in the US, funded by the Department of Defense, which uses the principles of cryonics as its baseline.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/10/health/a-chilling-medical-trial.html?_r=0
 
O

Oscurito

Is it not the case that the mother won the right to decide what happened to her daughter's body, rather than the daughter winning the right to be frozen? The father objected to her dying wish (due to costs, I believe). The judge seems to have decided that as the father had not seen the daughter for 8 years, the mother should get to decide.

So, it seems that the story actually is, "Mother wins right to decide on daughter's dying wish, as father had not seen daughter for more than half of her life".

Not really about cryonics at all, I'd suggest.
I've updated the OP. The father did in the end withdraw his objections.
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top